broke off something - how to get it out?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by kevinj, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. kevinj

    kevinj Been here awhile

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    Hi, thanks for your comments. The problem is getting the machine to a pro - that's what makes the whole thing costly.
    #21
  2. acejones

    acejones Long timer

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    I definitely learned something following this thread. I won't be buying a Ford Triton powered vehicle.
    #22
  3. kevinj

    kevinj Been here awhile

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    Taking it in.
    #23
  4. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    Yes I'd mull for a while and probably do it but I am a very long way from a dealer.I have some very small needle nose pliers, they'd probably be small enough to grab the tips first and pull them out. A couple good rare earth magnets on the pliers does magnetize then.

    Spray some stuff upward and let drip down to lube. Maybe the can of freeze stuff/bubble gum remover to shrink the steel.

    Extractors, just looked at mine, all new after many years of sitting there just in case.They are of the fluted type and there is one just large enough to grab 1/4" or so....could be enough and then it would avoid a smaller one farther into the cylinder.

    Tap it in there with the very small hammer and then some torque altough I'd have to trust my wrist for what the torque should be.

    If that doesn't work there is always Plan B....whatever that would be but still way better than breaking something.

    I'd be also weary of anything in the threads binding. Had enough problems with a plug back then that stripped the threads when removing it. Just from the hard carbon build ups at the tip.

    There....just tried it for you. No 6 extractor only goes down 1/4" or so and I can still put about 20 ft/lb of torque on the tool before it slips a little. Should be sufficient to get that out of there and no way I'd break that extractor in there.

    [​IMG]
    #24
  5. Dirty in all

    Dirty in all Adrenaline Junkie

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    By hand pressure I mean it should not be tight in the threads. The part that was making it tight has broken off and now it should be easily removed. Like removing a bolt or screw once it has been loosened by a tool. More than likely you didnt miss the mark on your torque wrench and mess up the threads. Very common defect with a spark plug. I probably change 60 plugs a week for 6 months out of the year and I see it about once a month. H96669 just posted the same ez out I have but I dont use the T handle. I have a nut driver that fits the end that I find is easier to keep constant pressure on and again doesnt require much torque to remove.
    #25
  6. Anorak

    Anorak Woolf Barnato

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    I think they improved them after 2008.
    #26
  7. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    In had the same thing happen to my Vstrom last year. I think is was a defective plug because I really didn't put a whole lot of torque on it. I always use a stubby ratchet just to make sure I can't wring something off.

    I went to sears and picked up a square style extractor...

    [​IMG]

    ... Like this. Just lightly tapped in into place with a small hammer and it didn't take hardly and torque to remove the stuck bit of plug. There's nothing for the remaining bit of plug to be torqued against so it should come right out unless the threads are boogered.
    #27
  8. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    The bottom of the plug was still in it. Reread what I wrote.

    Jim :brow
    #28
  9. heirhead

    heirhead Been here awhile

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    Hello kevinj

    Been putting in and taking out plugs for 45 yrs of riding, racing and never snapped one.
    Till recently. In and out on dr350 to check reading, to lean, snapped it off flush at head taking it OUT!!
    Friends saying easy out, not. "Pull the head, you've done that plenty and dr350 is easy- peasy"
    Confidence shot. Neighbor, mechanic, charged $100.00 to pull head off and re install every thing.
    Q and E in Anaheim Ca in business since 1965 said not stripped, just to tight. $50.00 to drill out and put in time-sert.
    $150.00 later bike runs perfect, rode it today.
    Figured if I can't put in a plug right, I shouldn't be messing around with cams, cam chains and stuff like that no matter what I did in the past.
    Your plug was nothing like mine, but your GS is like a super computer compared to my dr and if you
    F it up, well super computers are expensive to fix.
    Good decision.

    Heirhead
    Worlds worst mechnic
    #29
  10. kevinj

    kevinj Been here awhile

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    Hi everyone,

    there's been some interesting discussion on the thread, and I'm still amazed to be offered so much help. Many thanks to everyone on this thread.

    I bought the extractor thing; it was $3 or $4, almost nothing. But in the end I decided to have the dealer take care of it anyway. From what most of you describe on this thread, it's unnecessarily cautious. It was fairly expensive (less so if I succeed to bill my insurance for the tow as "roadside assistance" - don't know if they'll bite). But the bike is alive again after just a few hours.

    Another reminder for me to take it slow and be very careful in the future. I'd expected that this whole home mechanic business would be fairly easy once I had the right tools and watched the instructional DVDs. Turns out it's harder to learn than I thought. It's frustrating and discouraging at times like today. I hope the investment of time and money will pay off eventually.


    Goodnight everyone, and enjoy the long weekend,



    Kevin
    #30
  11. gsweave

    gsweave Yinz, blinkers are on, since 05

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    Don't give up on the home mechanic business.:deal

    Just know when to stop, step back have a coffee, get advice.

    ya done good
    #31
  12. homerj

    homerj 742 Evergreen Terrace

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    I've f-ed up more stuff than I can or care to remember. It's the f-ups that teach you more than any DVD. If you can, pal up with someone near you who's been spinning a wrench for a while. Their experience and judgement on what needs a new tool vs. what needs "professional" attention is invaluable.

    If you ever meet a mechanic who says he's never made something worse he's flat out lying. And we all get that queasy feeling every now and again when something doesn't go according to plan.
    #32
  13. Vanishing Point

    Vanishing Point A very sad panda

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    If you don't use a proper torque wrench to tighten spark plugs into aluminum heads and choose to just do it by feel don't grab the handle of the ratchet wrench. First hand tighten, then put the ratchet wrench on and grab the ratchet at the very front part. If you have reasonable sized hands you will cover part of the neck of the handle. This will allow you to get enough force on the wrench to tighten the plug but you'll have to really try to over tighten it because you don't have the leverage advantage of using the end of the handle. Tighten carefully and you can feel the little compressible ring compressing. And you can feel the resistance build as it becomes compressed. It's like a Zen thing to be able to visualize what is happening through what you feel in your hands. But you lose that if you use the mechanical advantage the full length of the ratchet handle gives you.
    #33
  14. Boatman

    Boatman Upward and onward!!

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    I've been changing plugs in engines for over 40 years and never broke one until last year. I was surprised at the little bit of force it took to break it. It was barely seated when the wrench suddenly had no resistance. A large bladed screwdriver with slight pressure was able to unscrew the threaded portion.


    [​IMG]
    #34
  15. concours

    concours WFO for 41 years

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    Any chance someone else over-tightened it when it was installed? Looks like a used plug. Or do we have some inconsistantant manufacturing here? Or like me, getting a little nueropathy, arthritus, etc and not the hands of a surgeon I once was? :eek1
    #35
  16. Boatman

    Boatman Upward and onward!!

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    This was my Super Enduro I bought with 1000 miles on it and the first time I had removed the plugs. I doubt they had been out before but possible I guess.

    The one thing I'm always concience of with reinstalling plugs is that the washer is already crushed. When it's tight I stop,,,, not like the uncrushed washer where you gradually build up resistance.
    #36
  17. Stan_R80/7

    Stan_R80/7 Beastly Gnarly

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    I was 15 years old and learned on my Suzuki TS125 that using a torque wrench can strip out the spark plug. At that time, a new head for the 2-stroke was $18.00. Since then I have always finger tightened until the plug seats - and if the plug does not seat take it out and find out why. After finger tight, tighten lightly with a 3/8" drive ratchet. Not having the plug come loose is all that matters. Learning from experience is often worth the aggravation - but learning from others experience is preferred.
    #37
  18. Lafitte

    Lafitte on the lake

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    1+ used a faucet seat tool that looked similar to remove a broken plug from my '94 Dodge Ram back when it happened to me. Tapped it in until it bit , then turned t out w/ a crescent wrench.
    #38
  19. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Long timer

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    I have seen this twice in my life, broken plug while going in that is. Once back in the 80's with a Chevelle. The other a few months ago with a Honda. Since the plug was new and the threads were not stuck they just unscrwed once you got something to bite them a little. Both cases bad parts, not bad installation.

    Now a spark plug that breaks while trying to remove, that is a COMPLETELY different story. Generally you are really screwed.

    Ford has a few other issues with the spark plugs. Blowing the threads out of the heads is common on early 2000's 5.4s. And the 2-piece spark plug on the 3-valve motors sounds bad on paper and is worse in real life. I refuse to touch them.
    #39
  20. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    Hey, spark plugs break. It happens..


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    #40