Budget Travel the Jamie Z Way

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by Jamie Z, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. WeeBee

    WeeBee Roaming ADV Gnome

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    Looks a lot like one of the Backcountry series of tents by Eureka to me.
    #81
  2. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    The tent pictured in my article is a Eureka Apex 2 purchased in 2003. I've noticed that the current Apex 2 tents are not the same, nor dark in color.

    My new tent is the Backcountry tent as guessed by Dave. I think dark colored tents are essential for stealth camping. It's not easy to find a dark green or dark blue tent. Most seem to focus on visibility.

    Jamie
    #82
  3. QED

    QED Been here awhile

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    There are a few more rules than that but thr idea is right. In many national forest areas they prohibit primitive camping. The best thing to do is to stop at the local station and ask for advice. Theyll let you know about the best places to camp free. Also keep in mind that they are locals and might not want to tell you about the locals favorite places. Be friendly, swap a few stories and take your time. Theyll be more likely to turn you on to their favorites.
    Another place Ive found to camp for free is small private airports. Since they are not lighted they dont operate at night and usually have picknic tables and porta poties. Ask for permission. Beware of the nice grassy area with automatic sprinklers.
    #83
  4. QED

    QED Been here awhile

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    Anyone out there see or thought of ways to use your bike to serve as one end of the hammock's h:1drinkanger -- keeping in mind that the pull on the hammock's lines are VERY strong. [/quote]


    I have a friend that sleeps on a cot. I dont carry one because I think theyre too bulky. But, he stretches a large waterproof ground cloth over his bike and stakes down the corners eliminating the tent. Works for him.
    #84
  5. maiden.jade

    maiden.jade Been here awhile

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    Just a suggestion for showers, sort of.

    I carry a collapsible bucket (made by Seattle Sports) on my road or backpacking trips. I use it in places where faucets are available but not shower rooms. I wash my hair in the bucket, clean myself and sometimes do laundry too (small items). When camping near rivers, I don't use detergent in it. So I carry the water in the bucket, wash up and dump the dirty and soapy water elsewhere.
    #85
  6. tomatocity

    tomatocity Retired and lovin' it

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    Good idea. hich ofthese d you carry?

    http://www.seattlesportsco.com/productcart/pc/showsearchresults.asp?pageStyle=%3C%25%3DbType%25%3E&resultCnt=10&keyword=bucket

    Another suggestion is to carry a solar shower (bag). Fill it up and tie it to you top box. As long as there is sun and warm temperatures you will have warm water.

    http://www.seattlesportsco.com/productcart/pc/showsearchresults.asp?pageStyle=%3C%25%3DbType%25%3E&resultCnt=10&keyword=shower&submit2=Go+%3E%3E
    #86
  7. maiden.jade

    maiden.jade Been here awhile

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    The smaller one of the Seattle Sports collapsible buckets. When roll up, it is small and light.
    #87
  8. swingset

    swingset Got the knack.

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    For showering where showers are scarce, or for expediency I like the flushable wipes. Not only are they good for other obvious reasons related to hygiene, but scrubbing with a few of them can clean you up pretty well, or at least until you get to a proper shower.
    #88
  9. nicolascav

    nicolascav Been here awhile

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    nice
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  10. HappyRiding

    HappyRiding Luddite

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    +1

    I spent a little time knocking around the country in a Cessna 150. Municipal airports are are on your road maps and almost always have grassy areas perfect for a tent. I would land at dusk and taxi around to scout a spot to put my tent. The advantage to flying in was staying INSIDE the fence. Being female, I always slept better knowing I was in a more secure area. Twice the airport managers left the FBO buildings unlocked so I could stay in the pilot's lounges. BTW, many pilot's lounges have showers.

    Traveling on my motorcycle, I have stopped at municipal airports many times to pee and get a snack from the vending machines. Most have an ice machine and cheap (or free) coffee. They also have "weather machines" to get a sneak peek at the radar. I have been known to let the weather pick my route. Also, I still love to look at airplanes so it is like a free mini air show for me.

    With the new Homeland Security stuff you won't be allowed inside the fence most likely but you are likely to get permission to put up a tent outside of it. Many airplane folks are also motorcycle folks so the odds are pretty good.
    #90
  11. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    Thanks for the airport tips, folks. That's a foreign place to me. I might give it a try next time I'm on the road.

    Jamie
    #91
  12. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    Well, I had an opportunity to try out the camping-at-an-airport trick. It didn't work so well.

    I was in... um... North Carolina maybe, very near the coast. There was a state park where I was headed to see if I could find a place for my tent. The park was loaded full, so I continued on to find a free spot. I passed a small airport. I went into the entrance, but it sure didn't look like a very good place to set up a tent.

    Airports, by design, are very wide open places. They're also quite secure. It seemed to me as I rode toward the main building that wherever I put a tent, someone would surely see me and probably come asking questions.

    Can you describe the best way for airport camping? Would they really not mind if someone just parked a motorcycle on the grass nearby and set up a tent?

    Jamie
    #92
  13. SpitfireTriple

    SpitfireTriple Seek Truth

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    I rather suspect that if you tried to set up a tent at, or even near, a British airport you'd wake up with a dozen Heckler & Kochs pointed at you. That's if you were lucky. Do it in some countries and you might never wake up. I think airport camping is a really bad idea.

    Washing. It's fun to wash in a river. I did get caught out in the Dolomites alpine region of Italy though. There I was happily scrubbing away...and the hydro-electric power station upstream decided to release a surge of water. I managed to get out sharpish, but my wash kit was swept away. I washed in the loos of several petrol stations in Turkey and Greece. They were generally filthy places so I didn't feel too guilty getting a bit of soapy water on the floor.

    Asking for discounts. I reckon there's a bit of psychology here. First of all, you're far more likely to get a cheaper deal if you're talking to the boss. Lower employees generally don't have the authority to do deals. But they would lose face if they went and asked the boss. So they just say "No".

    I agree with Jamie's suggestion to ask not for a discount but for a cheaper room. But I might have an angle on why this works: Asking directly for a discount damages the hotelier's self-esteem if you beat his quoted price down. So he says "No". Rather than asking for a price reduction, ask instead for a cheaper room. "Oh, that's a bit pricey for me, is there a cheaper room, I don't mind if it's a bit cramped or anything?" is less threatening to the hotelier than a direct request for a discount. You'll usually end up with exactly the same room (you'll never know this of course) . But you'll pay less. And the hotelier saves face. Everybody wins.

    Saving face seems to be more important to people in poorer regions. This makes sense. When you work a 12-hour shift for $10 and some wealthy (to you) foreigner comes in and arrogantly wants to shave something off the price that he can easily afford...well, it becomes more important to you to retain your dignity in such a situation.

    I discovered the face-saving technique by accident (I asked for a "cheaper room" after failing to secure a discount on the original room). And the room I got was fine. The technique seemed to work for me in Albania and Croatia. And, now that I think about it, Egypt. Conversely, one hostel owner in Turkey almost begged me to start straightforward haggling. I didn't acquiesce, because I didn't like the room at any price. It's not really relevant, but I am pretty sure the room was actually his own room. But there are clearly some places where haggling is part of the culture.
    #93
  14. chuckklr04

    chuckklr04 Banned

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  15. yosmitetom

    yosmitetom Banned

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    Airports, even tiny ones, aren't good in the U.S. anymore after 911. Cemeteries are good. Golf courses are good.
    #95
  16. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    Man, that's great. When you come through Memphis, give me heads up and I'll ride with you for a day or two.

    I've never done a trip which funded itself, but I once met a guy traveling by bicycle who was not only traveling at the absolute minimum budget, but he was carrying enough equipment to take, print, and mount photographs onto small refrigerator magnets. He would set up a small display every couple days and earn enough to fund himself for a short time.

    Wish I could pull that off, but I'm no sort of salesman.

    Jamie
    #96
  17. Lobby

    Lobby Viel Spass, Vato!

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    Did you consider submitting it to a motorcycle magazine?

    All you would have had to do was add some similes and metaphors, like the current crop of motojournalists use and you'd be famous. And rich.

    :deal

    "The hotel was cheaper than _________, and as dirty as ____________." Make them cool and funny and you've got it made.

    :wink:
    #97
  18. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    You don't know me very well. :eek1

    Jamie
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  19. inline4

    inline4 Long timer

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    On the TV, Food network, Feasting on Asphalt, Alton Brown stopped at a truck stop and bought a 12v cooker truckers hookup in the doghouse. He wired it to the BMW cycle and made meatloaf, rode on. It didn't cook, as it blew the fuse.
    Annyhoo, has anyone tried one of these successfully?
    12" L X 5" H X 5" approximate size.
    #99
  20. KCDakar

    KCDakar What are we waiting for?

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    Do you have a linky?