Building an Adventure Van

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Geek, Aug 12, 2011.

  1. Big Bird 928

    Big Bird 928 Long timer

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  2. rthuey

    rthuey twist your wrist!!!

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    insanity is not as easy as i make it look
    pre drill the wood. use soldering gun to make hole in fabric once it is stapled.
  3. TooFast

    TooFast Long timer

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    Can you show a backside pic of the wedge cuts vs stretching and stapling?

    Seems as though flatter the better for mounting/appearance - maybe even glue the panels in place and not have numerous fasteners showing?

    Having a hard time seeing how batting would improve anything except hold moisture
  4. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    Toofast: I thought I had some in my phone but I don't. I'll snap some pics in the morning when I'm back in the garage again. :freaky

    Someone on Sprinter forum suggested using industrial velcro for fastening walls. I have a rivnut tool, I was just going to do rivnuts and make everything bolt on/off.

    ...after I figure out how to drill a hole without shredding the fabric :lol3

    I'll try using rtheuy's idea and burning a hole on a test piece tomorrow as well.. see how well it melts.
  5. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    can't you use some of those christmas tree shaped interior panel fasteners that are standard on autos? I'd probably do that and just a couple bolts per panel, for a clean look. I think using the batting is a good idea.
  6. TooFast

    TooFast Long timer

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    Ancient Chinese proverb - if you use a twist drill, rotate it CCW so it won't "catch and ball up your fabric"....used this trick many times installing vinyl, etc. Sounds goofy but it works on fabrics! If you're lucky it may just separate the fabric weaves and not cut them causing runs, snags.

    Looks like another YT video coming!
  7. James Adams

    James Adams ɹǝsn uʍop ǝpᴉsdn Administrator

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    Velcro is good. And use foam instead of quilt batting.
  8. p-luc

    p-luc Let play out-side

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    On mine I use 0.25'' foam, the curve look better.
    All my board were profit with all the hole and with a spike I was marking the fabric with a sharpie. Don't forget when you make your wood panel to give room for the fabric, I got screwed with that at one point. to safe time I glue also at the back with 3m super 77, that way you save your hands, you don't need to hold the fabric.
    I don't remember how to put photo in, but I will figure it out.
  9. Audaciter

    Audaciter Long timer

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    :fpalm
  10. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    Hey where were you yesterday?
    Grinding a new Tier 7 TD...


    .mobile
  11. Audaciter

    Audaciter Long timer

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    Helping one of my soldiers move....in a snow storm. :bluduh


    I did find another one of your videos though. This isn't quite as hard hitting as the unboxing above, but close.

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/gVZr3WbMQ6w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  12. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    The great thing about that fabric is the weave isn't such that it shows not being perfectly lined with the edge of a panel. I think it's a great choice and looks really nice and factory.

    I'm guessing, a finishing washer/screw system would look pretty nice and be absolutely secure.

    [​IMG]

    I'm not sure push fasteners could be used, without a foam underlayer to hide its appearance under the fabric. Then, you'd have to find a style that's long enough and completely flat across the head. Of course, installing the panels and not allowing the fastener to push out against the fabric could be a challenge, too.
  13. CodyY

    CodyY ADVenture Capitalist

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    I agree. Push fasteners would be non-servicable also.

    Could pop a hole, soldering iron on the fabric after wrapping, then use those Honda style plastic rivets. Would save lots of time on riv-serts
  14. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    One of the biggest headaches on this project is sourcing what I need.

    3 local lumberyards.. none carry 1/8" plywood.
    none carry 1/8" closed cell foam sheets.

    I did manage to find this contact cement that was recommended

    [​IMG]
  15. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    Here arethe original two corners... in the next post I'll show some more stuff I just tried

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  16. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    Experimentation.

    Since I don't know what I'm doing, I am trying to pick pieces that do not really matter, and that are less expensive to screw up. Even with the part I attempted today, there is probably $30 worth of materials on the line if it goes wrong.

    Education is expensive :lol3

    I figured my "next easiest" piece to try would be one of the lower door panels:
    [​IMG]

    Not having any luck finding 1/8" ply locally, I thought I would give some 1/8" masonite a try :dunno

    I traced the shape onto the masonite with a sharpie:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    1 minute with the table saw, 5 minutes with the band saw and 1 minute with the drill press and I have this:
    [​IMG]

    Checking to make sure which side of the masonite faces outward:
    [​IMG]

    Cut out a big enough piece of interweave
    [​IMG]

    Spray it with contact cement, let it sit a few minutes
    [​IMG]

    ...then start folding over and stapling
    [​IMG]

    First corner I tried this.. seemed to work ok:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    For this concave curve I just cut slits and pulled:
    [​IMG]

    Tried just cutting slits on this and pulling too
    [​IMG]

    Pneumatic stapler is making life sooooooo good (I would have hated to try and hand press staples into masonite)
    [​IMG]


    Flipped it over and.... saw that there is a big wet stripe where I put the contact cement on too thick :eek1

    [​IMG]

    Other than that it came out great. Whether that wet spot will go away when the cement dries? No idea.
    I guess I'll know in a few hours.

    Oh well, lesson learned, be more careful with the cement (especially when it is cold and I'm working below its recommended temperature. Perhaps I need to warm the glue cans up in some hot water first :deal

    Used a punch to locate the holes
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    and used the stock press fasteners to mount the panel on the door
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The results:

    Old plastic on the left, new tweed on the right:
    [​IMG]


    This photo reminds me... I need to grow a pair and cut the holes for the back windows still :rofl

    So there it is.
    If the cement stripe doesn't dry/disappear, I've spent $30 on more education.
    If it does dry.. it looks good!

    :lurk
  17. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

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    Can I ask why you are replacing the panels and not just covering the OEM ones ?
  18. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    The OEM panels are coroplast... When we bought the van it didn't have windows so the coroplast panels are not the right shape for what we are doing.

    This particular panel I could have just covered but I specifically wanted to use it as a test for working with the Masonite which I'm hoping to build the walls and ceiling with.


    .mobile
  19. TooFast

    TooFast Long timer

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    Oh well, lesson learned, be more careful with the cement (especially when it is cold and I'm working below its recommended temperature. Perhaps I need to warm the glue cans up in some hot water first :dealquote


    If the garage is too cold, why aren't you working adhesives on the kitchen counters, living room, etc? Kitchen ovens work great for heating/hardening spray paints, etc....
  20. SafetyThird

    SafetyThird Pist-n-broke

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    Because when I do that I have to sleep in the garage :lol3