Building an ADVMoto R1100GS

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by gaspipe, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    I had a little time last night to make this a roller again, for the first time in a couple months.

    [​IMG]

    The front wheel is a 21 x 1.85 Sun, stainless spokes, with a 90/90 x 21" TKC80 - freshly shod today. The front disc has been properly spaced and the disc mounted.

    [​IMG]

    The rear wheel is a 18 x 3.5 Sun, stainless spokes, with a 140/80 x 18 TKC80. I have a MAP rear torque link [thanks to Jim Rowley of MAP Engineering] which will raise the rear about 1/2" or so, and it straightens out the kink between the rear drive and the Paralever. It is a beefy CNC'd slab of aluminum, and is a worthy addition to *ANY* 11xx GS.

    The 18" rear requires machining about .25" off the rear shock lug for the tire to fit, and leave what I consider sufficient clearance for the carcass to grow at speed.

    [​IMG]

    Still a lot to do, but most of the real precision machining is done, with the exception of the caliper hanger. That's the next item to tackle.

    The bike is so tall now, the centerstand has to be shimmed up with 2" of planks. The sidestand will need a 4" piece of steel rod sectioned into it to work again.

    Stay tuned......
  2. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    I'd also like to add, that although this seems like a daunting task, Motozilla did *a lot* of work sourcing out all these parts and having the vision to construct the frame and fork conversion. These pieces are of excellent quality superior craftsmanship.

    Like any kit, there are a lot of things to fit and modify, much of this because of specific changes I have made to the basic concept.

    Now that it's beginning to take shape, I am getting excited to finish it up.

    I have sourced a Two Bros cat eliminator pipe, which I will mate to an aluminum muffler in my inventory of 'stuff', and also a plastic tank from a '95 bike. This will serve to drop perhaps 15 lbs or so, and pick up a bit of fuel capacity at the same time.

    Note the instrument pod and headlight are gone. A Touratech Desierto Rally fairing and IMO dash system will replace the factory parts, and give the bike a different look.
  3. sherpa

    sherpa ...Robert

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    Looking good. :thumb...we're gonna have to get together and swap bikes...I'm curious about that 3.36 final drive. :evil
    I thought my 3.2 was low...your's is gonna be like a tractor.

    The side stand...I added 3.5" to mine with 5/8" steel rod...can't remember if it was the hot or cold rolled :scratch...but one of them fit inside the stock tubing like a glove.

    [​IMG]
  4. Guzz

    Guzz Gutless wonder

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    Hope you checked the clearance with the center stand... I did the same thing, only to find that it 'locks' up the centerstand. :huh

    Ended up swapping my modded side stand with an Adventure side stand (I put on Bitubo adv shocks on my standard GS).

    I still have to take time to lengthen my center stand, or wait for an adventure center stand to show up. Then re-work the side stand... again.
  5. sherpa

    sherpa ...Robert

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    Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh..........a noob like myself draws comfort in the fact that a member of the wrenching pantheon :bow....makes the same humbling mistakes that I do.... :lol3




    When I discovered my error...I just yanked the center stand off and threw it in the corner in disgust.........it was an easy way to loose another 5 lbs off the bike anyway. :rofl
  6. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    I noticed this morning that the area under the tranny/engine junction has a trace of oil. :scratch

    Since I was planning to pull the rear drive and swingarm to inspect and lube the driveshaft splines, machine some extra clearance for the rear wheel, and install the John Deere-esque 3.36 rear drive, I decided to go for broke and pulled off the tranny one more time. Off with the clutch assembly and pressure plate.

    [​IMG]

    I hadn't noticed before, but the prior owner changed the rear main seal, a common failing on these machines, but installed it with the seal lips facing the wrong way. Oops. I didn't even notice when I installed the flywheel and clutch assembly.

    Time to install a new seal. I'll see if I can get one overnighted this week and get this tank back together again. And five more flywheel bolts :bluduh

    Well, let's get a look at those splines.......I hadn't cleaned them yet, but the old lube was intact and still in nice shape. The splines are perfect.

    I installed a new inout shaft seal since I was in here - cheap insurance.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Toss in a new clutch assembly, and it's like brand new in there. The splines are all in very nice shape.

    The rear drive pivot bearings were trashed, but I find all the paralever rear ends seem to trash them in 20-30k anyway. They're cheap and relatively easy to change. Since I'm putting in that 3.36 rear drive, I'll install new bearings.

    The swing arm bearings are in great shape too.
  7. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    My inspiration and cosmetic goal is to resemble this:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    That's Jimmy Lewis' 900.

    I ordered a Touratech Desierto I fairing today.
  8. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    Note that the racebike requires a full frame - the tranny couldn't handle the swingarm pivot. Luckily, I ride at a much more relaxed pace than these guys. But it speaks volumes about what BMW and others know that need to be done for all out offroad riding.

    [​IMG]

    So, it's got me thinking about additional bracing on the tranny for the swingarm pivot.......

    :scratch :dunno

    Two new rear main seals are enroute by airmail to get the rear end back on the bike. The early 1100 only takes one seal, but it's best to have a spare. And my other 1100 takes the same seal. So, it should be a roller again this week.
  9. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    Take a peek at the swingarm bracing by the shock mount:

    [​IMG]

    Beefy. Closeup:

    [​IMG]

    And Bing carbies. Where'd the Motronic go? Also note they used simple gauges to synch the Bings.

    Good stuff.
  10. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

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    ding ding ding... did that for my ktm rear. water jet cost me about $50 each including material. popped them on the grinder at work to clean them up a little, then re drilled the holes just for the hell of it. piece of cake... do it gassy... and make extras.

  11. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

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    have you spoken to crash about the bracing he is building after his "boo boo"?

    [​IMG]
  12. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    That's where I've eventually going with this front end.

    A simple 340mm ductile iron rotor, 4mm thick, mated with six floating buttons to an aluminum center with a 0.250" offset is what this bike needs for braking power. I need to get this going.

    On the master cylinder issue, I measured up things one more time, and decided to say sayonara to the OE Magura master cylinder. I'd considered having a sleeve and new piston machined, but Magura really wasn't hip on the idea and was not a lot of help researching seals to use on the project.

    Sooooo, I used a hacksaw to rough out the removal of the master cylinder from the control assembly, and this will work. I need to set this up in the verticle mill and clean it up a bit more, recoat it with some expoxy paint, and I'm in biz with a sweet 16/18 Brembo Radial master cylinder to mate to the 4 pot Beringer caliper.

    Some pics of the rough out:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This will use all the OE BMW electrical connections and throttle cable. I have eliminated the BMW mirror perch, it would not have worked in this application. I'll come up with something else.

    Also, the Brembo seals and replacement parts (lever, etc) are plentiful and easy to obtain, so I get the best of both worlds - OE replacement availability and durability.
  13. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    Nope, I missed this whole thing.... :huh but figured it was in the cards looking at the pivot area.

    :ear

    ????

  14. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

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    pop crash a pm and i'm sure he'll tell you exactly what happened and how he has/will be preventing it from happening again.

    from the video i saw of the incident (yes it is on video!) he was not going fast... just clipped a root and rode through. stopped a few feet away from "contact" and you hear him kinda mutter "f-u-c-k-!"... that's all.

    hope all works out with the master cylinder. i know places like magura can be a pain to deal with. not too interested in one off stuff. have you tried some of the custom harley shops? those guys must have some kinda custom bore sizes available :dunno ... how about wilwood?

    for seals have you tried a good brake repair/rebuilding shop? there are a few around here... and if they can match up seals for a 1959 healey they can find something to fit a standard bore cylinder... especially if you have the leisure of machining the piston and seal carrier any way you like.

    either way... if you need a sleeve and piston made i'll be happy to do it for you. just lemme know.
  15. MountainMan

    MountainMan accelerating

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    Not gaining a hell of a lot of friction coefficient by going with cast iron..
    Nor much more in the way of heat dissapation (10% difference max)

    Factories do it cause they are using 1000's of those rotors.. cast iron is a hell of a lot cheaper then..

    1/4" hot rolled plate.. laser cut from a CAD file (no holes to drill, it'll be dead nuts) grind 0.046" off each side and you got your 4mm flat rotor..

    if you have the dims of your AL center.. i'll sketch the rotor up for you.. :deal
  16. Hay Ewe

    Hay Ewe Just a Wannabe

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    Hey Gaspipe,

    Fantastic project, looks like you are lucky enough to be doing some of the things a lot of us only think about.

    Any way, been following your thread for some time now and a couple of questions, the main one being your choice of front end and the difficulty as I see it of getting every thing matched up and in place, such as the brake rotor / caliper.

    I am wondering why you didnt for example get the front end off a WR400 / 426 / 450?

    Decent size forks, able to be revalved and sprung for the heavier bike (I think) a front wheel assembly that is 21 inch and already fits into the forks and triple clamps already the right size.

    If you wanted a bigger disk because of the heavier bike, get a super motard size disk and a re-locator bracket.

    I shall ask my next question as aonther post, hate it when there are too many q's and all the answers get mixed up

    Thanks

    Hay Ewe
  17. Hay Ewe

    Hay Ewe Just a Wannabe

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    OK, secound question, and yes, secound posting on this site,

    Are you going to do anything with the back end? new frame ? cut off the pillion peg loops? (have to make a new hanger for the exhaust?

    Hay Ewe
  18. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    Hey Hay:

    Since the triple clamp had to be custom machined, 'Zilla set it up to accomodate the trickest forks around - the 50mm 'Zoke Shivers. Although a different front end could have worked by machining an appropriate triple clamp, this bike went a different direction in the original concept. A KTM950 front end could have been made to be a bolt up, but the extra travel and rigidity of the 'Zokes was the direction we went. I *could* have spec'd the a dual disc KTM 950 front end, but I wanted this one.

    Interestingly, Jim at MAP Engineering pursued a similar but parallel development by utilizing an existing front end from a common MX bike, and welded the steering head to the original aluminum BMW frame. His creation is nothing short of amazing, and an elite approach to achieving his goal. I am very impressed.

    A 310mm or 320mm disc is a super motard sized disc. All the offsets aren't compatible in the combination of the fork, hub, axle and spacers, and that required some one-off machining of some parts to make the interface work. An off the shelf bracket wouldn't work. I am making a relocator bracket from billet 6064T6 in my shop to accomodate a 320mm disc. If that's not enough brake, I'll consult with MountainMan and see about a 340mm disc, and I'll fab another bracket.

    Somewhere along the line, the parts list shifted slightly from the original prototype that was built by 'Zilla. Those small differences in production parts spec'd have necessitated my fabrication of a series of one-off items to stick with the original goal. It's been a lot of work, but it's been fun work.

    There are MANY differences between the R1100GS bikes as they spanned production from 1994 to 1999, and likewise, the 1150 underwent many changes so far in it's production cycle. I think my bike is the only one built from an 1100 rather than an 1150 from these parts.

    It's been a lot of work, but the finished product will be quite unique and most important, FUN!

    :thumb

    Also, the 3.36 non-ABS rear drive arrived today. It shoudl be all sorts of John Deere gear ratios for offroading.
  19. gaspipe

    gaspipe Wandering Soul Super Moderator

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    I've trimmed away some useless tabs, but I am going to stick with the BMW rear subframe for payload capacity for now. I may change the fender over to an Acerbis, but I haven't decided yet.

    The exhaust hanger will be much smaller, as the exhaust is much lighter than the 1100's was.

    The fuel tank is a plastic OE version from a '95 bike. It was epoxy primed with vapor impervious primer, and repainted with urethane paint. I should get a bit more fuel capacity, and save a few more pounds up high on the bike - the place I've really been trying to cut weight (me included).

    I also sourced a Touratech MX style seat to replace the OE seat. It looks like an Adventure seat, but it has much denser foam. It is a personal preference.
  20. ramon

    ramon weezin' the juice!

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