Building electric clothing

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by HellSickle, Jan 8, 2006.

  1. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool

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    Make sure water does not get inside and corrode the internals. They are unlikely to trip when to required after that.
    BTW 15A is 180W at 12V -that is a lot of heat! :eek1:lol3
    Also, test your wiring by simulating a short at the vest connector to make sure the breakers trip quickly enough. Some of the wiring supplied with heated gear is pretty light gauge.
  2. KEN PHENIX

    KEN PHENIX "CERTIFIABLE"

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    Good advice. I haven't tested them in a while.
  3. chuggins143

    chuggins143 Been here awhile

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    Is it just me or does it look like valve stem caps might fit on those?
    Just a thought!
    C
  4. Ghostyman

    Ghostyman Been here awhile

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    I'm planning on buying a battery-powered heated shirt that uses a 7v dc battery. I want to connect the shirt to my bike's 12v battery. That should give me the option of wearing it off the bike around camp with the 7v battery and when I'm plugged into 12v on the bike I should have more heat. Are there any drawbacks?
  5. Dan Alexander

    Dan Alexander Ride Far - Ride Fast

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    I'd check to see where they put the heateing wires and how many of them there are. Wind chill on the bike would need a lot more than of them than a walking shirt. I've looked at Milwauke heated jackets sold at Home Despot but I don't think it'd heat enough for bike riding.
  6. Ghostyman

    Ghostyman Been here awhile

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    I've been getting by without heated gear until now so I'm hoping that this shirt (Longmen shirt by Mobile Warming, btw) and my new heated grips will keep me going a little better than before. I'm also pretty warm-blooded so I might not need as much heat as other people.

    The other thing I'm really looking forward to is wearing it around camp or into my sleeping bag. It seems like it should work as a small heating pad in my bag if I get cold at night.

    I just ordered the shirt and a power cord that I think will work. I'll report back with my findings.


    Here's a review of the shirt I'm getting (in a motorcycle context, too) -- http://www.webbikeworld.com/heated-...e-warming/heated-shirt-heated-vest-review.htm
  7. Dan Alexander

    Dan Alexander Ride Far - Ride Fast

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    If you've got the battery capacity to run it for a while, I think the off bike ideas are good. Will you have to step down the 12v?

    Heater wires are sized according to the power input vs resistance so it may heat the wires too much on 12v??

    Got a link?
  8. HellSickle

    HellSickle Scone Rider

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    Power increases with the square of voltage. Plugging a resistance designed for 7V into a 12V system will result in almost a 3X increase in heat. :eek1

    FYI, power = V^2/R. You should add either a step down resistor or a solid state controller to keep power the same.
  9. hugemoth

    hugemoth Long timer

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    A cheap and quick way to get heat inside your jacket is to use a $15 heating pad and a little inverter. You can put it against your chest, on your back, or sit on it. Puts out 50 watts, has a 3 level thermostat, is water proof. I've used this one for 15 years on the bikes and while flying my ultralight.

    [​IMG]