Building electric clothing

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by HellSickle, Jan 8, 2006.

  1. kerhonky

    kerhonky Adventure Poser

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    Ah. Again.

    Well, even if I don't try to build one of these things, I've already had quite an education in electronics and its symbology. Thanks for your answers thus far.

    Couple more questions:

    Do I have to use a 12mm pot? I have not been able to find such a critter yet. What headaches will I incur if I use a different type?

    Does it matter what kind of capacitor I use? In the 0.1 uF variety, I've found ceramic, film and other types.
    #61
  2. HellSickle

    HellSickle Scone Rider

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    Switches are rated on current, voltage is almost irrelevant.

    -Jeff-
    #62
  3. eap

    eap El Adventurero Solitario

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    mine was similiar to that (but used 'heat bond' fabric tape) and thus was born my avatar.

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=927&page=3&highlight=home+heated
    #63
  4. PowerT

    PowerT Long timer

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    Have you looked here?
    #64
  5. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    So ... 30f of 30 gauge wire .... bond it to a vest ... plug it to .... what?
    #65
  6. kerhonky

    kerhonky Adventure Poser

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    I hadn't, but I should have, because that's where I got the 30 AWG wire.

    So what's the advantage of the PWM over the lamp dimmer? Just more efficient? Is that terribly important if I'm not running any other accessories?
    #66
  7. GS THONG

    GS THONG Banned

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    If you are "TFC" to buy a good vest why are you in the GSpot?????
    Or dou you really just ride a CX500 honda?:puke1
    #67
  8. NJ Moto

    NJ Moto Long timer

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  9. xtphreak

    xtphreak from B4 "adventure bikes"

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    well firstly, THIS is EQUIPMENT, not GSpot :flip

    secondly, if you have to act all superior and shit, just just because they don't have a "what-ever-the-fuck-you-think-is-the-optimal-bike" ... then just go buy a harley and join the rest of the "I'm-so-much-better'n-you" RUBs. Just because you may have a lot of free consumable income doesn't mean everyone does.
    And some people actually LIKE to do things themselves, rather than buy the newest bling bling that "everybody" has.

    thirdly, a CX500 is better'n NO bike :asshat, climb down off your pedistal and find out that some people don't have your lifestyle ... and that doesn't mean YOUR'S is better.

    damn that was good coffee ... just add some NoDoze and ZAM! POW! ZAP!


    by the way n00b

    welcome

    I guess

    and fill outcher profile so we can "see" what you ride ... you sound like what's his name with his list of high$$ toys in his sig line
    #69
  10. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    Nice rant XTF! I gonna give it a 7.

    Back to the topic....here's what the heating elements from the 8 dollar Wal-Mart heated car seat pad look like, for anyone who's interested.
    #70
  11. xtphreak

    xtphreak from B4 "adventure bikes"

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    Hiya Ron :wave

    caffeine

    it's what's for breakfast :rofl


    I like the "panel" method much better'n stringing wires all over ... too much like work

    those look pretty usable to me

    how many watts?

    my panels are about 8"X8" and about 8 watts each

    started sewing velcro on the extra 2 so I can strap them on my forearms or biceps and help the cold arm syndrome

    I need to look at some of my industrial suppliers and see what I can find that's usable too ...

    JCwhatnot has the heated seat covers too ... here for $19.99 ... "35 Watts of power maintains 110°-120° F "

    Ron
    #71
  12. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    I didn't sew those up, that's what the panels looked like when I took them out of the heated seat pad. The two panels work out 35 watts.

    I used a difrrent brand pad on my other one, and it worked out to
    50 watts.

    The panels are about 10 X 12 inches each. The wire used in them isn't regular
    wire, I think it might be nichrome, with a fiberglass coating on it.
    (that's just a guess though)

    EDIT: Just checked your link, that's what they look like more or less...
    maybe check WalMart, I'm pretty sure I paid about 8 bucks CDN for them.

    A friend of mine liked the idea so much, he picked up 6 of them, and was going to heat his motorcycle seat and stuff as well.

    I suppose you could also use them to keep your beer from frezzing in the tank bag! :)
    #72
  13. xtphreak

    xtphreak from B4 "adventure bikes"

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    yeah I got that they were "ripouts" ... mine were pre-paneled too

    still way way better'n stringing wire all over hell's half acre :nod

    I'm gonna look for something else more abuser friendly, I'll post it up when I find it



    by the way, I LIKE my beer cold ... warm it up???:puke2
    #73
  14. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    Funny thing is, when it comes to running the clothing, I have to keep an
    eye on the voltage on the KLR 650, but the Suzuki Burgman scooter will
    run electrics like crazy! It's got a 120 watt outlet biult right into the glove box...
    #74
  15. RSL

    RSL Long timer

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    Regarding controllers, how do either the home-made or store bought $16 to $18 units compare with Heat Troller?

    In other words, can I sell my Heat Troller and get one of these, with similar performance?

    Thanks for sharing all your great info with the rest of us!
    #75
  16. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    They are all just PWM circuits, and pretty well work the same.

    I don't know anything about the 18 buck circuit, the one i posted works very well!
    #76
  17. RSL

    RSL Long timer

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    That's good to know. Maybe I can sell my Heat Troller and use the money to buy several PWM devices, to separately control the jacket, pants, seat, gloves, etc..

    Anybody done this?
    #77
  18. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    I've built a few triple controllers, for some of the IBR riders.

    They seem to work just fine, just make sure your bike has enough overhead to handle it!!
    #78
  19. kerhonky

    kerhonky Adventure Poser

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    Just wanted to post an update as to how my heated jacket has worked out. I wound up not using any sort of variable heat control, just an inline on/off switch. Thus far the choice has been moot, since the jacket has not gotten too hot for me, so I haven't had any need for the ability to dial it back any.

    I used a fairly lightweight jacket that is intended for cross-country skiing. Not a lot of insulation; it's essentially an outer shell meant to be used over layers. It has a mesh lining throughout, including the entire length of the arms though, and thus I figured it would be well suited for the project in terms of being able to distribute the wire the way I wanted to.

    I used about 40' of 30 AWG wire. 6 strands up and down the front, four strands in each arm, and 8 strands in the back. So far, it has not really worked as well as I had expected. Using it by itself under my Aerostich suit really doesn't keep me any warmer than just wearing a heavy fleece does. On days I've ridden in temperatures from 35 to 45 degrees F, I've also used a fleece jacket between the electric jacket and the 'stich. A bit of a hassle, but less hassle than wearing long underwear and having to change out of it in the bathroom when I get to work. It is kind of bulky though, and I'd prefer to be able wear just one jacket under the 'stich.

    Since I wasn't satisfied with the amount of heat that the jacket was producing, I reduced the amount of wire in it by a few feet by taking some out of the back. This has not seemed to increase the amount of heat significantly, so I may try to reduce it some more and see if that works. I think right now I'm down to about 34 feet of wire, based on the fact that my multi-meter indicates that the jacket is producing 3.4 ohms of resistance.

    While my body hasn't been really cold with the electric/fleece setup, the biggest disappointment was in my hands. Loads of people on this forum and others have sworn that if you keep your body core warm, your hands will be fine. Well, it don't work for me, Jack. My hands still get cold, and I have hand guards as well. Since I have over half a roll of the wire left, I'm trying to figure out how to make some heated gloves or glove liners next. Eventually, I think I'll have this worked out so that I'm warm enough with minimal extra layers. It's going to take some extra tweaking, though.

    Hope this helps anyone who's thinking about trying to make some heated gear.
    #79
  20. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    The vests I made using the car seat heaters will cook you,
    to the point where it would burn your skin if you ever had it next to your body. Maybe your wires are too far away, imbedded in the mesh?

    I don't know if you can get them there, but those hand warmers
    that you just rip open and produce heat work great!

    I have to agree with other people. Overall, if you can keep your
    core temperature up, your extremities should stay warm.

    Your profile says you're in NY state, can't you get a heated car seat warmer there, and try that? Try Walmart, or if you're across the border ,Canadian Tire.

    I paid 9 bucks for mine, and on the original one, just cut a hole in the crease to fit over my head, and wore it like that.

    When you have it running, it should feel like a warm sunny day,
    even at sub-zero temperatures.
    #80