Bultaco footpeg replacement

Discussion in 'Trials' started by Ymirtrials, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. Ymirtrials

    Ymirtrials Adventurer

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    I've got an M49 sherpa T that came with rigid footpegs and I'd like to change them to a set of standard folding style pegs. I've found a set from Sammy Miller that come complete with the brackets to weld on that I'll likely use. I have read on different threads that some have lowered pegs and some have raised them. What may be the main considerations when deciding on a new location for the pegs. I'm only 5'8'' so stock height seems comfortable to me, I'm also a new trials rider so I won't be attempting anything too trick for a while!:eek1 Thanks!
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  2. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    Lower the pegs as much as you can, but avoid moving them back, as this will take weight of the front wheel and reduce front wheel traction.
    #2
  3. Ymirtrials

    Ymirtrials Adventurer

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    Is the idea of lowering the pegs only to keep the centre of gravity low as possible?
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  4. PSchrauber

    PSchrauber Been here awhile

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    Yes this is the main benefit, as this makes balancing easier. Second you will recognize that you will stand more in the bike then on the bike.

    Anyway as you haven't posted a photo of your model 49, when I remember right, the footbrake lever is situated below the footpeg and also the gear lever shaft is situated to the standard footpeg position. so you can't go too low with your peg without doing changes to the levers too.

    In my experience the Sherpa is very heavy in the front, I believe you have recognized this too, expecially when you want to lift up the front end up for climbing over obstacels, steps, ... on the other hand the bike has a good directional stability but turning thight is often easier on other bikes, (Yamaha / Fantic, ...). The front wheel likes to push when turning thight and using some throttle. My first Bultaco a Sherpa m221 had this behavior, (a 175cc with the frame of the m190). I now have a m199b where Bultaco has changed the footpeg position to the predecessors, now beeing situated lower and a little more back. The m119b has the same "turning" behavior but it's lighter to lift the front end, which I see as an advance as you don't need so much physical strength to ride the bike in modulated sections with steps and obstacels. Any disadvantege in turning I haven't experienced, but I believe I do put more body weight to the front when doing thight turns, (which doesn't work uphills i know), compared to my SWM, (where thight turns for me are easier).

    A good way to figure out your footrest position as the area to mount is limited might be the way it's installed here:
    http://www.twnclub.ch/classic_trial_files/patrick BultoM49_files/m49_restauration.htm

    With the additional plate you can change the position once again if you don't feel comfortable with it.
    #4
  5. Brewtus

    Brewtus Buffoonery, Inc.

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    Really. That's your advice. At this point, I have no choice.


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    #5
  6. Ymirtrials

    Ymirtrials Adventurer

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    Thanks for the insight, making a bracket as you have is a good idea. Here is what the pegs currently look like, the brake is behind the peg and the shifter has been cut and welded vertical so it can't be hit by rocks etc.

    [​IMG]
    #6
  7. Ymirtrials

    Ymirtrials Adventurer

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    Ooops, have to figure out how to link images...
    #7
  8. Ymirtrials

    Ymirtrials Adventurer

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    [​IMG]
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  9. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    Looks like MX type footrest position on that, so you will need to fabricate a mounting to move the footrests properly.
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  10. Brewtus

    Brewtus Buffoonery, Inc.

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    Sweet!! :D
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  11. Rockcat

    Rockcat LDA

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    I have the same bike. That is the stock early footpeg mount for the Model 49. I have been trying to find the later folding pegs and mount without luck. The Model 49's that I have seen ridden today have the pegs lowered by 1 1/2 inches and moved back about an inch.
    #11
  12. Ymirtrials

    Ymirtrials Adventurer

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    Down and back sounds like a common theme on the old Bul, I will likely try to fab a mounting plate for the new style pegs and brackets when I get them. Have you done any other updates on your m49? I have changed the carb to a mikuni flat slide and put new shocks on the back. Other than that mine is mostly original. I still have to reseal the tank as it seeps a bit where it was repaired.
    #12
  13. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    If you can find some tube same OD as the frame tube which connects to the swinging arm pivot, then its easy to fabricate a nice triangle shaped footrest mount out of 2 pieces of tube. By the look of your bike I would say move the rests back about 3 inches behind the swinging arm pivot, with the bottom edge of the footrest mounting brackets level with the bottom of the lower frame tubes. You will also find its a big improvement to get rid of the "tiller" type top yoke, as moving the bars ahead of the steering axis will mean much better steering, and improved feel.
    #13
  14. Rockcat

    Rockcat LDA

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    After I fix the pegs, I was planning on getting an Electrex World ignition for it. I have a NOS Amal on it, but I'm sure a Mikuni would be an improvement. My tank has been resealed, but still weeps. Ethanol and age is taking its toll on the fiberglass. I want to keep it as close to original as I can.

    [​IMG]
    #14
  15. Ymirtrials

    Ymirtrials Adventurer

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  16. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    The only sure way you will be able to ensure your tank is ok to use with modern fuels, is to section it and install a chemical resistance layer using novalac vinyl ester resin and surfacing tissue, then bond back together. None of the sealing products such as Caswell can be seen as anything other than a short term fix, as firstly they are very brittle when cured, and secondly it is very difficult to key the inside surfaces of a used tank properly, not least one which has contained 2T fuel over many years!

    However you can greatly increase the chances of any of the sealing products working for longer, by making the effort to key the inside of the tank properly (carefully fixing the tank inside something which can revolve it at slowish speed, and putting a couple of handfuls of crushed glass inside works well). Also the addition of something to make the very brittle cured sealer a little more durable and less likely to crack is a very good idea, and if you add something like chopped glass fibre strands and mix in very well, this will certainly help.

    There are industrial sealing materials such as polysulphides, which I would imagine would work perfectly as tank sealers due to them remaining flexible when fully cured, and in effect forming a chemically resistant skin inside the tank, but I guess profits are much higher selling repackaged (500% markup) epoxy laminating resins (such as Caswell), so dont think any of these will be cooming onto the home user market anytime soon!

    Finally to have any chance of success at all with a sealer, you must be 100% certain that any fuel which has leached into the lay up of the tank itself is gone entirely before you try to seal it. Leaving outside for a week say if the weather is very hot will help with this, but if the tank has actually gone soft to any extent, then it wont be possible to seal it, and you will need to look for a replacement.
    #16
  17. PSchrauber

    PSchrauber Been here awhile

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    In my experience any glasfiber gastank which was used for 2-stroke gasoline is very difficult to coat inside due to the oil. If there is any oil left the inner coating will not "stick" properly on the surface. Expercially when the gas tank is already some years old and wasn't completly drained after use. The tanks are surly liquid thight but not completly vaporthight so the gas-oil mixture will go through the material. That's the reason why plastic tanks in general get discolored with the time. You can try to get as much oil away as possible with acetone which hopefully will only a little bit harm the resin. The good thing with acetone is that it crack up oil and too evaporate very fast, multiple flushing the gas tank with some lieters / a gallon acetone will probably help, but there is no guarantee that it will work.

    The easier and I believe less costly alternative is to get a new gas-tank made out of glasfiber with resin that is gas and ethanol resistant or buy a new one and coat the tank befor using him. A new glasfiber gas tank for your model with a gas and ethanol resistant coating is about 320 € at . http://www.francetrialclassic.com or try at http://www.bultacouk.com/ (no price given). In my opinion most applications for coating/painting the inner side of the gas tank works good as long as the (not only) the surface is really oil free.

    As I don't trust any bloomy promises of the dealers and even have my concerns with these tank seal coatings on plastic parts I have orderd a custom made gas tank that was made with oil, gasoline and alcohol resistant resin:

    [​IMG]
    #17
  18. Rockcat

    Rockcat LDA

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    Jay,

    Caswells. The picture hides flaws. There are many bubbles on the tank. This is my last eBay bike...

    I'm just going to ride it and have fun.

    George
    #18
  19. Rockcat

    Rockcat LDA

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    I don't believe any of these fit a Model 49.
    #19
  20. PSchrauber

    PSchrauber Been here awhile

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    I would call them or send them an e-mail, not all parts are on display, if they don't have it, then you have to get a custom made gas tank for you, this is may be the best way to do.
    #20