Butt Lube? How Can I Reduce Pants:Seat Friction?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Snapper, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. Snapper

    Snapper Long timer

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    OK, have your fun with the KY jokes, but I have serious question (street riding).

    For safety, I like getting a cheek off the seat during spirited cornering and under uncertain conditions (blind corners, unknown roads, surface imperfections) and my knees just ain't what they used to be with the constant unweighting and butt shifting - I pretty much stick to the tighter technical twisties.

    I started riding in jeans and leathers in my youth, then used textile suits for over a decade, and am now back to leathers for the past 3 yrs or so. The leathers stick to the seat much more than textiles and prevents easy sliding from side-to-side and my aging knees are finally catching up to me. I really prefer the safety and comfort of the leathers and so am looking for ways to reduce the friction between my ass and the seat.

    Just wondering if you good folks, or track day junkies, had any good suggestions. Of course, I'd prefer not to do anything irreversible (eg, ArmourAll my seat). :ear

    Thanks!
    #1
  2. txwanderer

    txwanderer Been here awhile

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    I hope the Armor All was a joke. Many things come to mind in your opening that would help, although not go over well around here. Are you wanting to slide on the seat or get rid of a hot behind? SOmetimes I don't undersand the code here LOL

    I'm not a track guy and never really "got" riding the streets like I was. Seems detrimental, but everyone has their comfort zone. I have been known to cross some large states in a day though.

    Kevlar and Cordura will breathe much better than leather. They also have the advantage of padded armor that will absorb impact on those "aging" knees. Abrasion is really good, and depending on your leather quality can be better than the current choice.

    Anti-Monkeybutt Powder is a very good product. It could help, but may not be ideal for leather garments. I guess you could just store the bike during summer and ride only in cooler temps (not).

    Good luck.
    #2
  3. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    Use what bicyclists use; Chamois Butt'r.
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  4. epicxcrider

    epicxcrider Been here awhile

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    That uh... goes inside the spandex. I think he means coating the seat with something to help the leather slide. Not coating the pants to help the butt slide.

    Right?
    #4
  5. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    While intended for use on skin, it actually functions fine when applied to treated cowskin also. Put a little on the seat / thighs of your track leathers and you can move more easily on the seat. It helps me to not have to lift up and off the seat to reposition my arse.
    #5
  6. Snapper

    Snapper Long timer

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    Yeah this is the idea... Just need to reduce friction between my leather pants and the vinyl seat so I can slide my ass side-to-side vs unweighted it, moving it over, and replacing every time.... Knees can't take it anymore.

    I was thinking about talc but imagine its pretty short-lived... also wondering if a seat cover (wood beads, sheepskin, something else?) might work better and more permanently.

    Thanks.
    #6
  7. RFVC600R

    RFVC600R SAND EATER!

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    I bought a gripper seat for my bike and it tugs my balls backwards lmao

    sorry I'm no help
    #7
  8. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    Beads work fine if you are only road riding. The ceramic ones have less friction than the painted wood ones.

    The lanolin-based creams work well for track use.
    #8
  9. epicxcrider

    epicxcrider Been here awhile

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    Nice! Good tip!
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  10. daveinva

    daveinva Been here awhile

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    I'll vote for a (plastic) Beadrider or similar cushion-- you can slip and slide on one all day long.
    #10
  11. Blue&Yellow

    Blue&Yellow but orange inside...

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    Just go police style - plant your fat ass in the saddle, tuck those knees in and sit bolt upright. Now proceed to riding faster than everyone else. :lol3
    #11
  12. HooliKen

    HooliKen Awesome is a flavor

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    Plyometrics my friend. It is not just a matter of "sliding" on the seat. Use your legs to lift your weee little ass up a bit when you transition from side to side. Strengthen your legs and no worries.
    #12
  13. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    No joke that.

    While you may not go 'as fast' ... you can get fairly close. Lean your upper body in - form a line from your nose to your inside elbow .. and lean your lower arm in towards the apex ...
    A males upper body has a fair amount of weight .. by doing the above the center of the body mass goes forward (to aid front tyre traction) and down (to aid the cornering). And you don't have to shift your comfortable butt - less energy is exerted (no knees) leaving the rider more comfortable and relaxed. And the casual observer does not 'see' the rider behaving like a racer.. :augie
    #13
  14. Blue&Yellow

    Blue&Yellow but orange inside...

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    They are extremely impressive riders, at least the ones I've seen. They purposefully train to maintain a neutral body position so that they always are ready to change direction. This is the safest way to ride in traffic since if you start leaning a lot while turning then you're suddenly commited to a certain line, or a variation of lines. But if you stay neutral you can change where you're going almost instantly, even when in a turn.

    Staying neutral also gives you great security and control over the motorbike. You can hug the tank as much as you like and you have the best possible grip on the handlebars for countersteering. Then the high seating position gives you superior overview and allows you to notice dangers or bad surfaces up ahead much easier. It becomes easier to pick braking points and perfect lines through corners, and since you're always upright you are also always ready for emergency braking.

    In the minds of the "invincible youth" - who are out dragging knees during the weekend - police riders are slow old farts that they could lose in 2 minutes or less on their sport machines. In reality a skilled police rider on something like a FJR1300 is outright faster than 95% of all other road riders and it will probably take something like an ex-racer on a 1000cc sports bike to lose him.
    #14
  15. Snapper

    Snapper Long timer

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    Thanks guys, appreciate the technique advice, but this old dog ain't going be learning new tricks.

    I'm approaching 4 decades of street riding the tighter technical twisties, current do over 12k/yr, and have been known to wear out the sides of rear tires before the centers. I'm a life long skier and having my ass/CoG low and to the inside just feels right and is second nature for me. My leg strength is actually huge (skiing/mountain biking), but my knees are not at the acute angles you tend to find them while constantly folded up on the bike.

    My textile suit (Stich) slides quite nicely and really takes a lot of pressure off the knees and I was just trying to get to the same place with my leathers. The Beadrider recommended above sounds like the right thing for me try - it has also been recommended from a riding buddy. Just wanted to know if there were any other good methods to lower the coefficient of friction.

    Thanks for all the great advice..
    #15
  16. tarbaby3

    tarbaby3 Adventurer

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    Learned the trick from Reg Pridmore to use a little powder on your seat. Works great for leather and Aerostich type suits, but use less on the textiles. Easy to wash off.
    #16
  17. Joetool

    Joetool Been here awhile

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    Have a seamstress sew a butt pad of textile on to your leathers...
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  18. Snapper

    Snapper Long timer

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    Ahhh..... as Yossarian and I were discussing in Post #5-6....Googled this:

    http://www.classrides.com/_press/press5MCExec.html

    "A little talcum powder on the seat makes the seat of one's leathers look a little sketchy walking around the pits, but makes moving around on the bike smoother, and smoother is faster."

    Does it last long though, or is an apply-once-daily thing?
    #18
  19. Blue&Yellow

    Blue&Yellow but orange inside...

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    How about getting something a bit more upright if you're still riding a sports bike?

    The new multistrada is mind warpingly fast and as comfortable as any touring bike.
    #19
  20. Snapper

    Snapper Long timer

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    ^^ yeah, learned that a while ago, currently a Tiger 800 Roadie. Don't need a lot power since the tight stuff I like is relatively slow speed.
    #20