cable lubing

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by TowPro, Oct 20, 2010.

  1. TowPro

    TowPro Lets ride

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    Some forums say "don't lube cables, they are made to not be lubricated" or "the lubrication will attack the plastic liner and destroy the cable".

    I have lubed every cable on every bike I have ever owned for the last 40 years. What should I do for my 2010 F800GS?

    I have the proper tool that clamps onto the cable allowing you to inject "lube" from the straw on the can.

    I have lube made for cables, but I always preferred Tri-flow.
    I also have this new DuPont Chain lube (O ring safe) which is beautiful stuff. Goes on wet and drys real nice leaving a Teflon coating. (the matching cleaner worked real nice to remove the factory crud, I mean chain lube).

    To lube or not to lube (and what to use), that is the question.
    #1
  2. GB

    GB . Administrator

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    Dealer says not to lube, the interior of the sheathing is teflon coated, lubing the clutch cable is not recommended or required.
    #2
  3. The Griz

    The Griz North Forest Rider

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    Good info Gadget Boy. Thanks.
    #3
  4. malloy

    malloy Been here awhile

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    FWIW: Haynes says to lube. What about the RepRom? How about lubing with DuPont Teflon? BUMP for more opinions:lol3.
    #4
  5. epicxcrider

    epicxcrider Been here awhile

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    Tri-flow would be a good compatable lube if you need it. But I wouldn't do it until it becomes "sticky" as otherwise it will just attract dirt.
    #5
  6. conrado

    conrado Been here awhile

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    The RepRom doesn't mention lubing.
    #6
  7. señormoto

    señormoto Supermoto Abuser

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    Carry a spare cable and don't lube the stock one.
    #7
  8. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

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    I have a lot of kms on the original cables WITHOUT ANY HANDGUARS, so the clutch + throttle are a bit exposed.

    a) to date.. clutch operates INCREDIBLY EASILY... even easier, than 1150 hydraulic. I lube only the both ENDS (not the bowden cable) with WD regularly
    b) throttle cable is a bit worse.. but not exactly bad

    so the cables and bowdens on 800GS look quite a wear-resistant.

    ---

    pure onroad.
    #8
  9. malloy

    malloy Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the replies, one and all :clap. Consensus is don't lube except a little grease on the nubs at the ends of the cables. Quite a change. Back in the day lubing cables was SOP and messy without the cute little lubing device available today. Broken cables were not uncommon, especially on dirt bikes. I have to admit to not lubing the throttle cables on my R1200GS but was pretty religious with other bikes. I haven't broken a cable in years.

    Ah, Teflon - the wonders of science and our space program :lol3.
    #9
  10. Hicks

    Hicks der Überluber

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    this week I've lubed again the ends (I mean the roll directly in the clutch lever and the joint on the opposite end connecting a cable to the clutch lever on the engine) with WD and the clutch operates a bit easier.

    So the basic lubing still increases the comfort and wear ;)
    #10
  11. Olvi

    Olvi Ice Butt

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    and gathers dust and dirt to increase stickiness and wear....

    If you want to lubricate those parts or levers, use dry film lubricants like LE Almasol Dry Film Lubricant.
    #11
  12. señormoto

    señormoto Supermoto Abuser

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    +1, and the inside of the cable housing does not need any lubrication because the lubrication is actually less productive than plain teflon. Reference: "The coefficient of friction of plastics is usually measured against polished steel.[13] PTFE's coefficient of friction is 0.05 to 0.10,[9] which is the third-lowest of any known solid material (BAM being the first, with a coefficient of friction of 0.02; diamond-like carbon being second-lowest at 0.05)." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polytetrafluoroethylene

    I don't see how the cables being used with or without handguards makes any difference to the operation of the clutch. If you were riding offroad and doing woods riding where the clutch line was apt to be snagged and pulled on by branches that would be one thing, but you aren't.

    What exactly are the cables and clutch lever being exposed to in your situation: air?

    Hicks - please lay off the ganja before posting - you're not making any sense lately. :rofl
    #12
  13. MotoRandy123

    MotoRandy123 Been here awhile

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    I always lube a new bikes cables with silicon oil use for R/C cars. I believe it stops corrosion on the steal cables. They may not need lube but if they rust they won't move so easy...
    #13
  14. veloce

    veloce Adventurer

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    There is a lot of bad information in this thread. :huh

    WD40 is not a lubricant it is a WaterDisplacer. WD40 will dissolve plastics, and is hygroscopic, which will cause your cables to corrode, and will collect dirt.

    Silicone oil should never be used for metal to metal contact. It is good for polymer to polymer and polymer to metal, but when used in metal to metal, it will inhibit the formation of an oxide coating an cause galling of metal surfaces. It will actually accelerate wear.

    Modern cables have a teflon liner. There is actually no metal rubbing. The teflon itself has a low friction coefficient with metal, thus needing no lubrication. (think of it as pre-lubed)

    The only lubricant that is not a bad idea is tri-flow. It is a dry lubricant, so it will not collect dirt as much, and will not attack plastics.
    #14
  15. GH41

    GH41 Been here awhile

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    I wanted to say the same thing but I didn't want to get into a month long pissing match with Hicks! I wouldn't use WD40 on anything unless I wanted it to rust!! I agree with you 100%. GH
    #15