Camp stove: Looking for opinions and reviews

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Soliok, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. klondike1

    klondike1 Nobody in particular

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    491
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Ok i did not get my Svea 123 in 1974 but had mine since 1976. They are a rock solid stove. I still runs great and can simmer very well. Yes my whisperlite will boil water about as good as the nuclear reactor at work but for an all round stove the 123 is it.
    #41
  2. hugemoth

    hugemoth Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,083
    Location:
    In the TARDIS
    I bought an Optimus 00 in the early 70s and it's still working after countless motorcycle trips. It has a rather large brass tank that holds enough fuel for a couple weeks. To preheat it I use a squirt of lighter fluid. This stove will still be working 100 years from now.
    #42
  3. Y E T I

    Y E T I No Talent Ass Clown

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,748
    Location:
    San Diego
    This is a very good point for anything longer than a 3-4 day trip. For local trips I use my JetBoil, but I wouldn't use it for trips more than 3 or 4 days because I'd have to carry a bunch of cartridges. For longer trips, MSR Whisperlite has worked well for me. Although that Svea looks pretty interesting. :hmmmmm
    #43
  4. Cal

    Cal Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    967
    Location:
    Calgary
    Svea 123 Yes!!! I bought mine in grade 10, 1970. Used it lots over the years and used it last summer for 4 weeks in Alaska The eye dropper trick to preheat the stove is the best.

    I guess we can tell the age of many Adv riders Judging by the number of 123 owners here. saw one in a cafe in the Yukon up on the shelf full of antiques!
    #44
  5. Scott_PDX

    Scott_PDX Leisure Engineer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,868
    Location:
    Portland...the newer one on the left side.
    For up to 3 day trip I use JetBoil (Easy to use, mainly backpacking meals). For longer than that I pack my MSR DragonFly (more invovled, but more options for storebought meals). Both are great stoves, for different uses.
    #45
  6. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    331
    Location:
    LA, CA
    I looked at the cool liquid fuel stoves mentioned above, but couldn't really spring $80+ and wanted something that would simmer since I cook eggs and pancakes on trips. I looked through a lot of forum posts and I'm always surprised that nobody mentions the Primus Trail Classic. I didn't really know about it until I saw one at REI. Not the most trick option, but it does pretty much everything you need from a stove for $20. Weighs next to nothing, boils water pretty fast and takes up barely any space. It uses the Isobutane cartriges.

    http://www.amazon.com/Primus-P-224383-Classic-Trail-Stove/dp/B000RHCOP0
    #46
  7. hansi

    hansi Teurer Abenteurer

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    316
    Location:
    State of Jefferson


    Great piece of kit, easy and very fast as long as you don't run out of those little gas-cartridges in the middle of your dinner in the middle of nowhere. Hard to get at the mom-and-pop convenience store. :D
    #47
  8. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    I had that same stove and was excited about what a great deal it was. I got it for 20 bucks from Sierra Outfitters. I took it on a couple camping trips and on the 3rd trip i was camping out with my son and it decided not to work anyone. I googled a video on my phone on how to clean it and we went into the campground bathroom and did our best but no joy, I took it appart when i got home and ran it through the dishwasher but still nothing. Thats when i started looking for a dual fuel and settled on the Coleman stove for 50 bucks. Its 30 bucks more larger but more versatile and maybe more reliable. At least thats my experience so far.
    #48
  9. klondike1

    klondike1 Nobody in particular

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    491
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Actually there is the fire starter toothpaste tube. It works very good and burns longer to ensure a good start. My wife laughs when i say i need to get some flammable toothpaste.
    #49
  10. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    331
    Location:
    LA, CA
    That's a bummer to hear. Mine's gone on a couple weekend trips so far with no problems. What brand of fuel did you use? I've been using a $5 GigaPower cartridge with no problems.
    #50
  11. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    I used primus canisters.
    #51
  12. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    So i've been wanting one of these portable grills for a while so i pulled the trigger for a kit over at advdesigns.com. Its 30 bucks and worth every penny. So awesome grilling at camp. It does take a couple minutes to assemble so wouldn't want to use it every night plus you have to have charcoal.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/xdul5J7dkbA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


    My Son Dakota making diner at camp last night out in the Desert.

    [​IMG]

    My sons using a little twig type folding stove. We use it as a back up when we're on the road. Its called a Pocket Cooker and makes for a nice little back up in your cooking kit. Only goes for about 15 bucks. If you have a pocket stove in your cooking kit you'll never worry about running out of fuel. I wouldn't use it as a main stove just a back up. Here's a video on its use.

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Kg8LPrh-D60" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #52
  13. Griff93

    Griff93 n00b

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    8
    Location:
    Huntsville, AL
    I mainly use an MSR Pocket Rocket. It's really small and light. I bought it for backpacking. I've had it since 05 and used it quite a bit. It has never had a single problem. We did a stint on the Appalachian Trail with it as well. I even used it this past weekend for my first time dirt bike camping unsupported. I've done a ton of camping and lots of riding, just never together without having my truck as my previous bikes didn't lend to this.

    I also use a coleman 502 stove. These things are extremely reliable. Mine has been in my family since 1962. We've torn it apart to clean it once after it sat for several years before it was handed down to me. It's really a much better stove than the pocket rocket. It simmers very well for actually cooking on it. It runs great on unleaded as well as coleman fuel. I recently took it on a 3 day jeep adventure ride and it was flawless. It's not really that much bigger than the pocket rocket when you take into account the butane fuel container's size.
    #53
  14. BenZens

    BenZens Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2012
    Oddometer:
    12
    Location:
    lost in Saskatchewan
    Wow what great timing in finding this thread as I am in the market for a good stove and cook ware, Anybody know where one can purchase a Svea123 in Canada or do I have to order online?

    Ben
    #54
  15. ontic

    ontic

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,074
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Ebay for starters-
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Optimus-Cam...361?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2c698bcbb9
    I don't know after that. I got mine on ebay. Given how tough these are and how long these things last, buying second hand (like I did) over the internet shouldn't be seen as a problem either.
    #55
  16. Jeff B

    Jeff B Socially Awkward

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6,256
    Location:
    SW PA.
    I have become somewhat of a collector of various types of stoves. If I had to give them up and keep only one it would have to be the Svea. Every now and then when I pass the shelf it sits on I have to pick it up and tinker w/it. Hell I even shine it up w/Neverdull every now and then.

    [​IMG]
    #56
  17. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,985
    Location:
    Maine
    I bought a multi-fuel stove last year in prep for a particular trip. I used it several times to make coffee and tea out in the dooryard before the trip. It jammed and failed within a month. The heat control pushed a wire a few inches around a couple of bends. It was designed to fail. Campmor refunded my money.

    I used my old Svea, which unlike Jeff's is mostly dark brown with patina. I used it with pump gas, regular, on a couple of trips and more testing at home to see when it would clog. No clogging with several pints of gas.

    I was looking for a better stove and found that my '70s Svea is it.
    #57
  18. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    Running fuel with gas treatment through multi fuel stoves every now and then is a good idea i hear.
    #58
  19. Two Wheeled 'Tard

    Two Wheeled 'Tard Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Oddometer:
    165
    Location:
    Chicago (sort of)
    Throwing in my two cents and probably reiterating what others have said.

    tl;dr:

    MSR Whisper-Lite
    Good:
    -Burns any fuel on the planet
    -Finer heat control
    -Uses any kind of pot
    -Can do semi-complex cooking
    Bad:
    -Kinda heavy
    -Bulky
    -Fiddlier setup/breakdown (gets your hands sooty)

    Jet-Boil
    Good:
    -Very light and compact
    -Super-easy setup, snaps together
    -Boils water very quickly
    Bad:
    -Uses special fuel cans
    -Very limited ability to cook or vary temperature
    -Have to use their special attaching pots/cups

    For long-distance motorcycle trips through remote areas, I carry an MSR Whisper-lite. It's not the smallest thing when you add in a pot and fuel bottle, but it's very stable in wind and on uneven ground, and will burn any sort of fuel you put in. Good ability to vary the heat output, so you can do some semi-complicated cooking with it if you're up for it.

    When I'm backpacking on multi-night back country trips, I carry a Jet-Boil. It's much lighter and simpler than the Whisper-lite, packs down smaller and sets up WAY easier. The downside is you have to use the little propane containers, which are plentiful in basically any store near a National Park or popular backcountry destination, but can be hard to find in more remote areas. In my experience you also can't do much in the way of cooking with it; it's built to boil water very quickly, and that's about the extent of it's abilities. There's some heat control available, but not much and I've ruined a couple of cooking containers trying to simmer a pasta sauce (and then baking it to the bottom of the cup).
    #59
  20. donmac

    donmac casual angler

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2010
    Oddometer:
    257
    Location:
    East Coast
    I used a Svea 123 backpacking in the 70's and canoe camping in the 80's/90's - and I suspect it is still kicking around here someplace. Around 2000 I started using a canister top stove and for motorcycle camping and last year switched to a JetBoil. For compactness and boiling water rapidly the JetBoil is awesome. And one of our vendors had some great deals on JetBoil stuff just recently. (fullthrottlecamping.com - see vendor forum)
    #60