Camp stove: Looking for opinions and reviews

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Soliok, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. thumperbuddy

    thumperbuddy Outdoorsman?

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    I dont like stoves that require a bottle for liquid gas.
    1. adds weight/bulk
    2. you have to pump them up and keep them pressurized.

    They arent as versatile as liguid gas stoves, but I still prefer a canister fueled stove over a liquid gas one. Check out the Optimus Crux. Basically the same operation as an MSR Pocket Rocket, but higher quality, lighter weight, and, it fits into the concave base of a fuel canister for storage. :clap Oh, and it boils a liter of water in around 2 minutes!

    For backpacking, I like a combination as follows: Optimus Crux stove and a 4 oz fuel canister (generally a Snow Peak GIgaPower). Both fit into a Snow Peak Trek 700 Titanium pot. If its a longer trip, I might take along one extra 8 oz canister.

    I feel that a canister stove is superior, and i especially like the Crux for its light weight and size. If you're trip will take you past civilization, ANY store that sells camping or outdoor supplies will have canisters, and therefore you won't have to take extras with you.
    #61
  2. DirtDabber

    DirtDabber cultural illiterate

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    Another vote for the Svea 123. Mine is a youngster and has only been around 30 years or so. Never has failed me. Have a whisperlite that I thought would replace it but never did.
    #62
  3. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

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    Added weight? How so? A gasoline fired stove can be fueled from your bike's tank every night and poured back into the tank after the morning cooking is done. On a carb'd bike, crack the float bowl drain and fill the bottle. On a fuel injected bike, unplug your low pressure return and fill with the fuel pump.

    Added bulk? Either a pressurized gas or liquid stove needs a fuel container. There are many solutions for carrying the fuel bottle on the exterior of the bike. AFAIK, there are no options to carry a pressurized gas can on the exterior.

    Pumping? Thats not really a big deal. My XGK holds pressure quite well, despite being 15 years old. 30 strokes while the generator tube is priming will provide more than enough pressure to cook both a meal and hot water for cleanup.

    My backpacking trips occur in the winter months, a stove failure is somewhat more than an inconvenience when its below 0f. The XGK fires the first time, every time in those conditions.
    #63
  4. thumperbuddy

    thumperbuddy Outdoorsman?

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    Very good points. As far as weight, a pressurized gas STOVE tends to be lighter than its liquid gas counterpart. Also, a brand new, completely full pressurized canister weighs ~4 oz. Add 2 oz for the Optimus Crux stove.

    My MSR 32 oz liquid fuel bottle EMPTY weighs 6 oz. So even if you used fuel from your bike, a stove and pressurized fuel weighs the same as just the bottle for a liquid gas stove.

    As far as strapping a can to the bike's exterior, I agree that the cylindrical liquid bottle is easier to attach. The canisters are pretty small and can be stuffed just about everywhere, but that goes for both systems. However, my personal prefered system allows me to store my fuel and stove inside my cooking pot, with a bit of room left over for, say, some cutlery or perhaps some spices in bags. Assuming you use the same cooking pot for both types of stove, the pressurized stove saves room.

    Pumping isnt really a big deal, I guess my point with the original post was that canister stoves are much simpler to use. Screw on stove, open valve, light.

    Liquid stoves are more versatile and reliable, but when I'm winter backpacking (or 'shoeing), I'll more than likely be making a fire, and when I do, I can simply place my fuel canister next to the fire (SAFELY!) to warm it enough to start. If i'll need the stove in the morning, I'll simply keep the canister between my bivy and sleeping bag, sleeping bag and liner, etc.

    In the end, it comes down to personal preference. For backpacking, I'd take the canister stove for convenience and weight. On a bike, it depends, but I'd probably still lean toward the canister stove just because it fits into its own pot with fuel and that's a pretty big space-saver. Just my opinion.
    #64
  5. max384

    max384 Bandaided

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    I use this cheap canister stove. It fits on a standard Jetboil sized compressed gas canister.

    [​IMG]

    I used it for a two week trip, a few 2-3 day trips, and many day trips. It has worked flawlessly so far and is very compact. It may not be the best stove available, but for under $10, it's hard to beat it for the money.
    #65
  6. marksgone

    marksgone Adventurer

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    MSR Whisperlite. It aint no whisper (think afterburner) but runs on readlily available fuel anywhere on the planet, inexpensive, easily serviced, packs small and can cook all night long. Downside, dirty, takes a while to get the hang of and not as sexy looking as some of the flash jetboils (but thats ok, I'm cooking not pickin up chicks!). Had mine for years, bicycle journeys through central america, eastern europe and oz and taken it bushwalking more times than I can remember. Starts every time!
    #66
  7. dutchjohn

    dutchjohn Adventure Touring

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    [​IMG]and it all fits into this bag
    [​IMG]
    #67
  8. Iggster

    Iggster Tornanti ├╝ber alles!

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    I have been using a MSR WhisperLite International since 1996 on backpacking/camping trips. It will run on any type of fuel. I have almost always used white gas but have had to use gasoline one time. I have cleaned it once in 16 years and it has performed flawlessly every time. I hope to use it for another 16 years!
    #68
  9. woofer2609

    woofer2609 Been here awhile

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    +10
    I bought mine in 96. I bought another one at a garage sale 5 years ago, but sold it because I realize the first one is never going to wear out. I've got the international version that'll burn gasoline, camping fuel, and yes, once, even diesel. the bottles fit into a bicycle water bottle holder and are strapped in.The mounts attach to hard luggage nicely. Nothing boils water faster, especially when it is cold out.
    Best of all, there is absolutely NO waste.
    Oh, and CHEAP to run.
    #69
  10. Craig McCurdy

    Craig McCurdy BIGMAC

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    MSR WhisperLite International :thumb It's the only stove we have had! And we keep the tank full of Non-Ethanol Super Unleaded... Works great in the stove as well as the bikes! :D
    #70
  11. aquadog

    aquadog Dude Buddha

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    Background: stove user since about 1967, canoe/whitewater raft/camping gear rental company owner since 1996. Lots of experience with stoves, and the luxury of turning them over and trying new ones. They're all mostly pretty good, and a lot is preference, familiarity, and whether you have a specific purpose, like needing to melt lots of snow.

    That said, most MSR products I've used have been pretty bulletproof, even the ones that didn't simmer, or sounded like a jet. I still use an old Whisperlite myself, and rent some MSR.

    If people want to stick to an older model stove and it works for them, great. They do wear out, though, and you might be surprised that modern stoves are usually an improvement.

    I'm currently using a Primus Gravity II Multi-Fuel, which burns white gas, regular auto gas, kerosene, parafin (sure wouldn't want to) and can use LP cannisters. Leave the parts behind that you don't intend to use. Expensive, but so far, worth it. This stove is in the rental gear, people like it.

    I also use an MSR Pocket Rocket, but often put it on a Brunton stove stand, which makes it more convenient, stable, etc. Not suitable for my rental clients (need more stove usually), but for personal motorcycling, it's tiny, works fine. That and a small GSI cookset and it's all good for personal use.

    Third stove I'm using right now is a Primus Classic Trail, simple, cheap cannister stove that works fine. Have to say that where LP cannisters are available and recyclable, I'm liking them. I've also gotten lazy. For a remote trip, I'd use gas (someone noted you can use gas from your bike), where I can get cans, I use them.
    #71
  12. draglemmag

    draglemmag Adventurer

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    I'm sold on my Jetboil...been using it on long trips (5 days to two weeks) for five years without issue and have used it in rain and wind (aluminum foil "skirt" shield). I have prepared everything from numerous variities of freeze-dried food (which I find quite tasty...chicken and mexican rice, sweet and sour pork,scrambled eggs and bacon) to frying up chicken breast and vegetables to steak and sauteed mushrooms. I've cooked canned meals like soup, chili or stew by placing a small rock in the bottom of the pan, placing the opened can of food on top of the rock and then filling the pan with water to just below the can lip. Then I crank it up and let the water boil around the can and in a few short minutes, wallaaa. It has a french press device for coffee that works great in the morning when your rushing to break camp and get going. I can always find a camping/grocery store to get food so don't carry more then coffee, honey, olive oil, tabasco, salt/pepper. I did a 10 day trip in September and camped 7 of those days...used it every morning and night and emptied one can of fuel. Everything fits neatly in the cannister including the fuel can. Very rugged too and dosen't have all those little parts to manage. Great camp tool...I love it.
    #72
  13. ktmman

    ktmman Adventure Dood

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    perth australia
    I have had my XGK MSR for 5 years now, many many trips under its belt and it has never let me down... in all types of weather.. Ive used it in near 50deg on the Gunbarrel hwy and also at "dam near freeze your ass off" always reliable.
    #73
  14. vtduc

    vtduc Been here awhile

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    +1 for MSR products. I have one of the originals (pre-multifuel, whitegas only) that is 35 years old and still works like a champ.
    #74
  15. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

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    And the best part? A $35 pump/valve assembly will replace all the wear parts in the stove. I just gave my XGK II a new pump/valve, after ~25 years, it was nearly time. It comes up to pressure faster now and shuts down a bit sooner.
    #75
  16. Okie Preacher

    Okie Preacher Been here awhile

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    I have a MSR Reactor that works great. Boils water faster than anything I have ever been seen. I have used it a sea level to 12,000 feet, hot or cold, wet or dry. Coffee and oatmeal in the morning, soup or any of the dehydrated meals in the evening. I have used the same 8 oz. can of the MSR Isopro fuel all 2012 and can't seem to use it up! I carry a spare, but this thing sips gas and only burns for a couple of minutes at a time.

    It isn't elaborate and would not "cook" or simmer well, but if you need hot water and want it fast, the MSR Reactor is a great way to get it.

    http://www.rei.com/product/736977/msr-reactor-stove-system
    #76
  17. rjsurfer

    rjsurfer Been here awhile

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    "find it at every gas station"

    I carry my own 3.9 gallons with me:D

    +1 for the Coleman dual fuel stove.

    Ron W
    #77
  18. dutchjohn

    dutchjohn Adventure Touring

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    Just a Plain City in Utah
    got one for x-mas this year have played around on the patio with alcohol burner. I also got the gas burner which is faster and hotter then the alcohol. it was a windy day and the built in wind break works great! still want to play around and cook some things at home and practice up for the trail! and you can find heet in the yellow bottle anywhere for alcohol, just dont drink it
    lol




    #78
  19. Aaen

    Aaen Adventurer

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    Location:
    Courtenay, BC & Calgary
    New here, but i do a lot of traveling for work and hiking and regularly use a one piece stainless steel alcohol stove on the road and sometimes at home when i feel like it.

    The guys name/handle is smokeeater908

    http://www.outdoortrailgear.com/cottage-industries/smokeeater908/smokeeater908-store/

    These are very similar in design to the minibulldesign ones, however are one piece stainless steel., versus a piece of silicone holding the stove together, less to lose parts wise. They can be burnt off of denatured alcohol, heet (yellow bottle) and high proof alcohol, believe this was previously mentioned though. Either though are very well built.

    They are very efficient, you can use them as a boil water type stove, dry bake muffins/biscuits, use a frying pan, etc. these guys cater to the ultra light backpackers/gram weenies, but the stoves they produce are absolutely amazing. Granted alcohol stoves are not for everyone, i suggest thy be brought a long as a second option. Actually i would have an alcohol as a primary, nd a small wood stove as a back up.

    Oh and if you are a boil water type kind of person and dislike most of the current offerings(mentioned earlier on), i can highly recommend packit gourmet foods, probably the best tasting dehydrated grub out there. Try the chili, doodies chicken dumpling soup and gumbo, mmmmm.




    Steve

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    #79
  20. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    Location:
    Collingwood, Ontario
    I use:

    2 burner propane for canoe-camping in large groups, with a 5 lb refillable tank. No need for photos, since this makes no sense for motorcycle use.

    MSR Superfly cannister stove - I like this model because it uses all brands of cannister, while most stoves require a particular type of top to mount. Boils fast, cannisters last a long time, simmers well, zero maintenance.

    [​IMG]

    Steverstove alcohol stove - for trips when all I need to do is boil water for coffee, tea, oatmeal, Ramen noodles, backpacker just add water meals. $10 stove with Heet fuel, super light weight, ideal for short trips.

    [​IMG]

    I know everyone has their favorites. This is a good read:

    http://www.pmags.com/stove-comparison-real-world-use

    Personally, I don't like liquid fuel stoves, but I'm glad I have friends who do, since sometimes they are the best option. We're going snowshoeing in 3 weeks, and one of these will come along, as it is the best cold-weather option.

    For extremely remote areas, below freezing, or extended duration motorcycling, multi-fuel, liquid-fuel stoves make the most sense, since fuel supply will never be an issue.

    For my shorter trips in North America, a cannister stove is ideal: they set up faster, boil faster, simmer better, doesn't smell, doesn't require priming, and suits my lazy style. I have friends with liquid fuel stoves that get pleasure from the starting process, and that is fine, but I don't.

    You can mail cannisters, if supply is a concern http://gottawalk.com/shipping_fuel.htm
    #80