Camp stove: Looking for opinions and reviews

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Soliok, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. mrt10x

    mrt10x Dumba$s Jarhead

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    excellent post and I agree with everything you said.. .Only thing that confused me was your comment that the MSR stove can use any type of fuel bottle "while most stoves require a particular type of top to mount" I have several fuel canister style stoves and everyone of them can use any of the cannisters by any company?? Can you clarify what you meant?
    #81
  2. Eladbern

    Eladbern Adventurer

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    38
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    Bowling Green Kentucky
    I bought an Msr whisper lite internationale . Burns pretty much anything that will combust and burns it anywhere. I keep a small bottle of white gas and a large bottle of unleaded that way if somebody screws the pooch and runs out of gas on the road they have some and if I'm on a long enough trip to run out of white gas I have fuel without having to drain the tank. The msr is self cleaning And fully field serviceable in a matter of a couple minutes. If you decide to burn something weird you can change to kero/jet fuel jet in a matter of minutes and fully packed with a small bottle of white gas,both windscreens, spare o-rings(just in case) a couple boxes of matches and the stoves tool it all fits in the tiny compression sack that came with the stove. All packed away it is roughly the size of half a loaf of bread.(to me space taken to carry things motorcycle camping is a sticking point)What more can you ask for? I've heard complaints that its hard to make simmer but frankly all I do is boil water for coffee and camp meals anyway and it boils quickly enough for me. How quickly depends on your fuel choice naturally. This stove was replaced last year after being in production since 1982 with the msr universal that will burn all the same fuels plus can be set up for propane leaving these little beauties available at a nice cheap price. I think they are 89 bucks new. Hope you find the info useful!
    #82
  3. Idle

    Idle Been here awhile

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    Northern California
    I have a sno-peak rocket stove. It works well, but for just making coffee on a day ride I leave it at home and take my alcohol stove. It just packs smaller and is no problem to set up.

    The stove, a 30ml bottle of fuel, enough coffee for 6, the press, and "igniter" and windscreen packs in a ti 700ml snopeak cup, the press screen I poached from my kitchen press, it fits perfectly in the pot and makes good coffee, I drink it out of the pot.

    [​IMG]

    No pot stand needed with a penny stove, just put the pot on the stove. I made a safety wire spider thingy (pictured).
    It eliminates the heat sink of the cold pot on the stove.

    KISS..

    Haven't got a multi day trip in yet, but will bring more alcohol and the canister stove aswell when I do.
    #83
  4. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    When I selected the Superfly (10 years or so ago), it was the only stove in the store that said the connection to the bottle was designed to fit the common brands. Others, like the Primus Gravity and MSR's Pocket Rocket indicate you need to use their brand of cannister.

    You said you have several stoves and the cannisters interchange, so maybe I was seduced by MSR's description. I would expect manufacturers would prefer that consumers buy their consumables, like inkjet printers. The connection to the cannister looks different on the Superfly and the Pocket Rocket, so I assumed it is true.

    From MSR's (Cascade's) website, re: the Superfly:

    The SuperFly canister stove’s adaptable, Multi-Mount™ interface makes it our most versatile canister stove when traveling internationally. It’s compatible with most self-sealing fuel canisters and sturdy pot supports add stability for larger pots. A broad flame delivers even heating and makes the SuperFly stove one of the fastest boiling stoves available. Available with or without piezo auto-ignition.

    Universal: Multi-Mount™ interface fits most self-sealing domestic and international canisters.
    Fast: Boils 1 liter of water in 3 minutes.
    Full Flame Control: Glove-friendly controls allow precise flame adjustment, from a simmer to a boil.
    Broad Flame: Disperses heat for better cooking performance.
    #84
  5. terryckdbf

    terryckdbf Pickles

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    Another satisfied Trangia user.

    Terry
    #85
  6. Downs

    Downs KK6RBI

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    I picked one of these up and it has now replaced my Coleman Max backpacking single burner. 8 bucks takes a bit to come in from China but this is a really cool little unit. And unlike my 25 dollar Coleman has a pizeo ignition system. You can get a hell of a flame out of it to boot.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004U8CP88/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00

    Runs on standard Iso Butane/propane canisters

    Flame is adjustable from very low to Saturn V :rofl
    [​IMG]
    #86
  7. vagueout

    vagueout Long timer

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    I have gathered a growing menagerie of camping stoves usually picked up second hand. The clear winner for me is the coleman feather . Runs on my bike's fuel , fires up in a few seconds, no dribbly priming , and a super clean non sooting flame with a fair degree of control. Love the little bugger.:*sip*
    #87
  8. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    Me too and the 1.5 L fuel bottle I now carry saved me a couple times from running out on the bike. I used to carry a 750ml but not enough, had to also pour the fuel from the stove back into the tank years ago. Ran out a few feet from the gas pump.:rofl

    I sure looked at updating but will just install my new regulator and a new pump and good for another 20 Years of looking beat up and LOTS of heat.:clap

    Looking for fuel canisters on the road, I am so glad I left that behind 20 years ago.:clap

    Coffee has to be fast in the morning, more time to sit and look at the maps.:*sip*
    #88
  9. Downs

    Downs KK6RBI

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    I've never been left without a canister but I don't cook large meals on it either. Just stuff for me and MAYBE one other person.

    I usually carry the canister I'm currently using plus one spare and I can't think of a time I've ever had to break out the spare canister while on the road. I usually give it a shake and if it sounds low or almost empty I'll take it out back and put a hole in it then toss it into the recycle bin.

    The canisters usually last a pretty good while. At least in my experience. And even if I did happen to run out somewhere I have yet to go into a wal mart and not find them on the shelves.
    #89
  10. burmbuster

    burmbuster Long timer

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    I have been tossing my choices around a bit and have settled on carrying two stoves. An MSR Reactor and a Steverstove for simmering. For what I plan on eating, the MSR Reactor will be used for breakfast and dinner. The Steverstove will be used for dinner when I actually want to "cook".
    #90
  11. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    A few of my friends in Boy Scouts in the mid to late 60s had the Svea 123 so I had to be different. I got an Optimus 8R. Just like this, except
    older and MUCH more used looking:

    [​IMG]

    Awesome little stove that works just as well today as it did when I
    bought it in 1968(?).

    My newest stove is a Brunton Optimus Nova MultiFuel Expedition Stove (NLA):/brunton-optimus-nova-multifuel-expedition-stove:

    [​IMG]

    No longer available (I think) but appears to use the same guts as the other current offerings.

    I also have a larger Optimus Hiker, which is similar to my old 8R except a little larger with a pump on the tank. Found it on sale a few years ago for a good price, so picked one up. Haven't used it yet. :lol3 Will try to get it into the rotation this year.

    This is it:

    [​IMG]

    Oh, and all I ever use in these is pump gasoline. Never had a problem, and my reasoning is that it means I carry a little extra fuel for the bike, if needed.
    #91
  12. JohnnyTh

    JohnnyTh Been here awhile

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    Thats 3 great soves you have there. All 3 is used by the Norwegian army. Take care of them and they will burn forever.
    But be aware that last model have a filter inside the tube comming from the tank. This got cloged on mine, even i used camp stove fuel. Pulled the filter out and no problems after that.
    How much fid you pay? I have a few for sale.
    #92
  13. Robidob

    Robidob Adventurer

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    Jacksonville, NC
    Hands down the Jet Boil with electric starter if you want a compressed gas stove.
    #93
  14. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    Why carry 2 stoves?

    Steverstoves don't simmer very well, though there is one that is designed with different hole patterns to improve this. And you can raise the pot higher to reduce heat. Burn time is limited to the 10 or 12 minutes from 1-1/2 or 2 oz of alcohol, then you refill.

    I have an MSR Superfly cannister stove, and it is the best simmering stove I ever saw used, and I have camped a lot. The Steverstove is great for what it is (I have one), but it isn't the one to do gourmet cooking on. Boils water great, lightweight, cheap.

    I only carry the alcohol stove when I don't want to carry the cannister stove.

    Cannister stove is better if you really plan to "cook", alcohol stove is good for hot water for instant meals, tea, coffee, etc.
    #94
  15. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    Ooh, thanks for the tip about the filter. :thumb

    It has been a few years, but I think I paid around $159 US for the Hiker.
    #95
  16. AlanCT

    AlanCT The Byronic Man

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    Location:
    Northeastern CT
    I have three stoves, which I like and use for different things.

    Coleman 535 Dual fuel

    Pros:

    Durable, controllable flame, can run on bike gas, parts available in any town if needed. A red plastic Folgers coffee can makes a perfect carrying case

    Cons:

    Heavy and a bit bulky, but not a big deal on a bike.


    Coleman Exponent propane canister stove

    Pros:

    Tiny, quick and simple to use. Great for fair weather backpacking or riding two-up when space is at a premium.

    Cons:

    Works poorly in cold weather, canisters are expensive and not as easy to find.

    Homade "Supercat" alcohol stove

    Pros:

    Cheap, easy and fun to make out of a small cat food or similar can and something to make holes with. Light and tiny. Cheap, easily available fuel. Perfect as a backup or to make quick hot food or drinks.

    Cons:

    Short burn time; just enough to boil a small container of water. Highly susceptible to wind. Easy to spill, so needs extra care taken.
    #96
  17. Chip Seal

    Chip Seal Long timer

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    #97
  18. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    I like and use both my coleman dual fuel and my msr whisperlight, all depends on my mood and how/what I want to cook. BUT I'm really wanting one of those optimus hikers!
    question, how do they simmer?
    #98