Camping trips on the bike with her

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by jj le roux, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. jj le roux

    jj le roux Adventurer

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    I'm considering camping trips on the bike with my lady and was wondering what you guys do? How do you setup up and what to you take with? I would imagine these won't be much more then 4-5 day stints.
    #1
  2. Mgbgt89

    Mgbgt89 Long timer

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    I did it on a KTM 625 for 2 weeks. Tent strapped to the bars, wolfman beta plus bag on the tail with a sleeping bag and clothes in it, and bed rolls strapped to that. It was cramped but we both loved it. When it gets colder is when its trickier to pack everything.
    #2
  3. jj le roux

    jj le roux Adventurer

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    Do you have any pictures? Take any utensils and food or did you just eat out?
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  4. Mgbgt89

    Mgbgt89 Long timer

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    This was in east colorado:
    [​IMG]


    Right before we left:
    [​IMG]

    We just ate along the way, I didn't like the idea of carrying food in bear country.
    #4
  5. jj le roux

    jj le roux Adventurer

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    Thank you for the pictures. It was quite cramped but suppose a lot have to be said about your mindset and your sense for adventure. I have to say that I do think a coffee in the morning would be a minimum requirement for me. So I guess I'll pack a little stove or burner of sort.
    #5
  6. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones AdventureDeficitDisorder

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    Keep her warm.

    Keep her fed.

    Keep the mileage down.

    You'll know you did it right if she'll go on a SECOND trip! :lol3
    #6
  7. BlueLghtning

    BlueLghtning Riding is my passion

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    If you are 2up on the same bike space becomes a huge issue, so definitely learn to park smart and if you have to go without, make sure its you until you get her into it. :D If you already own the more expensive and smaller sleeping bags, mats, & tent, you are ahead of the game. If not, this could get expensive quick. My wife rides her own bike, so that makes it much easier space wise. We both really enjoy the camping off the bike though.

    Not sure how much experience you have with camping off a bike before, but higher quality sleeping bags are definitely worth it and make sure its warm enough for the temps you are going. Don't always believe the temp ratings and in some cases they are really optimistic. Having a good pillow is my key feature and it took me awhile to find something I could live with. My wife seems to be very easy going here herself.

    I love when we cook out when we camp, but that's another whole range of crap to bring and since my wife does the cooking, she's not always happy about that.

    You might skip the cooking the first trip and just try the camping part first?
    #7
  8. jj le roux

    jj le roux Adventurer

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    Yes I agree! Bit by bit trying new stuff every time you go. Adding things. I've done a few trips with Amanda but none of them camping on the bike. The longest was 5 days and considering we did well and managed to keep it light. I don't have panniers only a plate with a TT bag and cargo nets. Will have to invest in racks and some soft luggage eventually.
    #8
  9. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    I almost always travel 2-up. One pannier for my stuff, clothes, stove, some food, etc, one pannier for her stuff, clothes, eating utensils, pot/pan,etc. tent/chairs in bag on rear rack, sleeping bags and air mattresses in waterproof bags on top of panniers. camera, maps, gadgets and doodaas in tankbag.
    no matter the length of trip, we take the same amount of clothes, 2-3 days worth. lightweight synthetics, wash in camp or motel, dry by morning. our setup works for a quick weekender or a multiweek trip. as for riding gear, we each wear goretex jackets and pants, no need to carry raingear, though we do usually carry packable lightweight rain jackets for in camp.
    and there is always room for my flyrod!
    lot's of women, and to an extent men, want to carry too many clothes, just remember, your on a trip, you'll never see those people again, and they don't care what your wearing anyways!
    #9
  10. CanadianX

    CanadianX Oh!? That is deep.

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    Do you do a lot of camping, does she? If she is new to camping then keep it simple the first time, even if your are an accomplished outdoors man. What bike do you have? Not a huge consideration but you can certainly plan in more comfort on a bigger bike. Are you planning to stay in parks or free range camp? Different considerations for what to bring. Will you move each day or will you go to a destination, establish camp and then ride out from there? Benefits to both but if you are changing locations build in a extra day so you spend two days in one spot, takes some of the edge off having to break camp each morning to make miles. I carry a days worth of snacks, water, and other food stuff, things that are easy to pack, light and durable. A couple of freeze dried meals, bag of bagels or pop tarts if I have space a can of soup, peanut butter. Baby wipes and hand sanitizer and baby powder or foot power. A foot rub with hand sanitizer followed by some foot powered after a day of having you feet jammed in your riding boots...very nice.

    I have a whisper light stove and small cook set complete with sporks, small plates and bowls and mugs. It all fits into something about the size of a small loaf of bread. Jet boil is another popular option and is even smaller. I also have a charcoal/ceramic water purifier that fits over the top of a nalgene water bottle, so I can pull water from almost any water source. Means I don't need to carry as much drinking water on me.

    All of my kit is meant for backpacking so is light and compact and durable. Your choice of tent and sleeping kit will depend on the weather and season where you are. I have a 3 season tent it's a little heavier but is water proof and I can leave the fly off if it is nice, also it is a bit bigger and has a sheltered vestibule. If you have a left and a right zip sleeping bag you can zip them together (mummy bag is warmer) Also boil some water before you rack out and fill a nalgene bottle and toss that in the bottom of her sleeping bag to warm her feet. (unless it's already hot out)

    Whatever you do it'll be keep it fun and relaxed and any hiccups in planning or resourcing your trip will just be a fun thing to experience and overcome together.
    #10
  11. jj le roux

    jj le roux Adventurer

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    Such valuable advise. Thank you guys. I have a 800GS but planning to upgrade to a LC or 1190. Like you said a bigger bike might be better for two up and more weight. Do you have pictures of your bikes loaded?
    #11
  12. Capt_phun

    Capt_phun Been here awhile

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    I love taking my "self-lubricating dick warmer" camping. Sure beats beating on yourself in the tent.
    pack light, buy good lightweight backpacking gear so you dont weigh the bike down.
    you'll have to stop more than normal for pee breaks & stretches. let her have access to a camera so she can take pics & be occupied to forget about sitting as pillion for 6-8 hours.

    at the end of a long day, break out the s'mores and she'll forget all about sitting on a small seat.
    #12
  13. ThirdBestFriend

    ThirdBestFriend Explorer

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    :eek1Wow, and we wonder why more women don't embrace the ADV lifestyle.

    Seriously though, one thing to consider with women is that it is not always about the gear with them. My wife—and most of her girlfriends—seem to care about eating healthy more than the average guy does. I've found that skipping the freeze dried stuff/pasta/peanut butter camping food and going for more fresh fruit and vegetables helps her maintain energy and keep up a attitude positive on the adventure.

    Also, those types of meals are something she can plan and execute much better than I can, so it helps her feel like she is contributing much more in an area where she is the expert.

    Finally, it has the benefit of being better for me nutritionally and tasty to boot. Left to my own devices I'd be camping on cereal bars, potato chips, and beer.
    #13
  14. Eyes Shut

    Eyes Shut See no evil

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    Here's a picture of our set up on the bike:

    [​IMG]

    We're on an R1200GS, and have traveled many miles 2-up. We have Micatech side cases and a Vario topcase. The topcase holds raingear, extra gloves, and some tools. I'm the passenger and get the left-hand side case (which has the cut-out for the exhaust). I carry my clothes, maps, snacks, and extra water. He carries clothes, tools, and a laptop in his side case. The tent, sleeping bags and pads, and Jet boil stove are carried in the dry bags that are lashed to the top of the side cases.
    #14
  15. Chinookmark

    Chinookmark Been here awhile

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    I'd suggest for the first one just do a local overnight trip, fairly close to home. Maybe even camp with some friends with their cars. You can find out what you need, what you don't, what you forgot, and how to pack with little to no risk of a miserable trip.
    #15
  16. AviatorTroy

    AviatorTroy Long timer

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    Here we are after packing up from the first night on the TAT a few years ago.

    Did about 2 1/2 weeks on the road like this, but did hotel it a few night when it was simply too hot to camp.

    [​IMG]
    #16
  17. AviatorTroy

    AviatorTroy Long timer

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    Oh yeah, one more important thing I learned.....

    We now have a 1200GS with Jessie Safaris and a large BMW soft tail bag, and I'll tell you this, don't sweat the luggage space on a bike. If you have more space, you will simply fill it up with more crap.

    I love the Beemer but I think traveling was simpler and maybe more fulfilling on the KLR with less luggage and a slower pace.
    #17