Camping without a tent?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by Biddles, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. 11motos

    11motos Feral Rider

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    I have made a burrito system and to me for one rider and his/her gear is the best thing.
    you can make it with a light tarp for the summer and a bit thicker if is winter.
    I am sad I don't have any pics but next time I will make sure to take some so I can explain.
    The reason I do an enclosed one with a bit of netting is because of the ants, mosquitoes and other bugs
    that will wake you up. In the winter the cold so you want just a bit of a vent passing through but
    leave fairly sealed up and the warm will stay. There are tarps that have reflective material
    on one side you can also collect heat from a fire next to you and will keep it inside. These are also
    ligth. I don't have one of those but seen others use it.
    It is very easy to make and is faster an dlighter than a tent. I have two tents and if I am alone
    I am done with tents.
    #41
  2. eddie bolted

    eddie bolted BOING!!!

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    108DD5DE-FC21-41C9-8444-2F963567FA5E.jpeg
    #42
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  3. BiGR Rich

    BiGR Rich Been here awhile

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    Looking back at the OP, I'm not sure I'd even try sleeping out if I wasn't prepared for it.... I mean, sure you could lay down wherever and get some rest, but without at least SOME gear it wouldn't be good rest. In the OP, they said a hammock is out of the question since they don't own one already. That leaves us with sleeping on the ground.....and I can't sleep without some type of pad / mattress underneath me (an achy back is one thing, but I'm a cold sleeper).

    Seems like everybody has their own "minimum" system already..... and I'd rather get creative with my packing and get more than my minimum system if I could.
    #43
  4. CopperClad

    CopperClad Adventurer

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    Siltarp. Tyvec drop sheet. Good mat and bag. Simple is good.


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    #44
  5. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    Tyvec is tough and waterproof. Great choice for ground sheet.

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    #45
  6. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    Ive heard if you run it through the washing machine cycles multiple times it makes it quieter?
    the time or two I tried to use it it was so noisey moving on it, or in the wind I was turned off of it.
    #46
  7. River-Runner

    River-Runner Been here awhile

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    FYI - if you try to make a bivi/bedroll cover to match your sleeping bag size, cut the Tyvek bigger than finished size because it will shrink when washed. A sheet of Tyvek over your bag at night will really provide a lot of extra warmth without condensation. We both carry one as our tent is a three season with mesh and it is not very warm.

    Bunch of Youtube video's on making a bedrool.
    #47
  8. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    Since you're leaving in the morning... yes. Bring a tarp, sleep in the open. I've probably spent dozens of nights like this. Life is good.

    If I sleep on the ground without a tent, I like a casualty blanket for the bottom, and set my mat and blanket (I prefer a lightweight down blanket over a bag) on top of that. Bring 2 casualty blankets and you have the option of putting a roof overhead or making a wind block. The Costco down throw will get you down to the low 50's. Take 2 and go even lower. That's what I did this past summer on the WABDR. A good alternative to the Costco down throw is the Snugpak Jungle Blanket.

    That being said: for tent poles, you might consider a 1.5" PVC tube for the poles. Cap it off on either end, and you have a small, durable, lightweight way to carry them without having to bring a huge duffle bag. This with my Tarptent Rainshadow isn't much more weight than a decent tarp set up (42 oz for the tent and 20 oz for the pole/stakes/in PVC tube with end caps). I realize this probably won't work for you as you're leaving in the morning.
    #48
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  9. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    That looks like a winner. Any idea what the packed size and weight is ?
    #49
  10. oleve

    oleve Adventurer

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    for me, the important thing is sleeping bag[​IMG]
    #50
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  11. Golden955

    Golden955 Been here awhile

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    Back in the eighties when I got my first bike, I would strap a sleeping bag to the back. I would find a beach on the North Shore of Lake Superior or one of the ten thousand plus lakes in MN and just fall asleep to the waves crashing.

    Now I'm a spoiled 50 something and I take a four man tent, pads, pillow, you name it. This was last summer on an eight day trip through WY, ID, and MT from home in CO. IMG_20170725_094322.jpg
    #51
  12. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    Sprint ST?

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    I use to load my Sprint like that, but taller. Had my lady onboard. After a 3,000 mile road trip she said I needed a bigger bike.
    #52
  13. OrangeDreamCycler

    OrangeDreamCycler .......Explorer of Options.......

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    Sometimes I don't even pitch the Tent for an overniter
    If i'm staying a few days ill pitch it. Shaves a lot of time
    On leaving in the mornings. I have an air mattress, ground cloth & gortex bivouac bag that take care of business.. ODC.
    image.jpg
    Happy Camping.
    #53
  14. Golden955

    Golden955 Been here awhile

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    It's a 99 ST, picked it up three years ago with 3.8k on the odometer for $2,800. Besides the plastic fuel connectors failing on me (luckily at home), it's been flawless. At 6'2" I think it's the perfect size for me, can't convince the wife to join me on my trips, not that I try too hard; ) I would buy that model again in a heartbeat, the later year versions aren't as stretched out and my knees aren't getting any younger.
    #54
  15. GunNut37086

    GunNut37086 Been here awhile

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    I slept on the ground with just a blanket that I kept in my trunk when I was younger. Decided to spoil myself by adding a hammock and rain fly to that blanket later.

    Now that I'm old and soft, if I can't have my tent, sleeping pad, sleeping bag, and a pillow, I'll just rent a motel. LOL Anyone my age sleeping on the ground and or just a tarp has my respect.
    #55
  16. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    I had the same yr. I put about 20 k on mine in two yrs. Fantastic bike. It gave me no trouble. I replaced a light bulb. The millage was always around 50. Didnt matter if i was on a 2 lane at 50 or 2 up crossing Nevada at 95. Enjoy, your wife woundnt like it anway.

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    #56
  17. tallpaul63

    tallpaul63 Long timer

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    I'm working on a sleeping kit that could fairly be described as minimal. It will work for bicycle touring, and for ultra light motorcycle touring when I want to keep my baggage really small and light. I have a bivy sack ordered, a light down sleeping bag, a Tyvek ground sheet, a tarp that can be set up as an A-frame shelter with a ridge line, and an Exped inflatable mattress. Should be less than five pounds all told, and it will fit in a very small duffle.

    I am aware of the limitations. If there are mosquitos around, I will need to add a bug net. I won't have a camp chair, or cooking gear. If the weather is really stormy, I'd prefer to have a good tent. Still, I like the idea of having the ability to camp if the weather and location are good, and I like to have a "bail out" option whenever I travel, for that day when there's no room at the inn, or your other plans fall through. If I was on a dedicated camping trip, I'd have a more luxurious packing list that makes more sense. The bike doesn't really feel the extra ten pounds.

    I'll try this on some 70/30 road trips: 70% hotels/hostels etc, and 30% camping. We'll see how I like it.
    #57
  18. Eigerhiker

    Eigerhiker "This is an Adventure"

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    When I was younger and living in Montana I would put a medium size duffle on the back of the DRZ400 and ride into the mountain for multi-day adventures. Only carried clean underwear, hygiene supplies, tools, camping gear and two thermoses. The camping gear was an inflatable pad, sleeping bag and a tarp with cord to use as a ridgeline to keep the morning dew off. The thermoses carried something warm for the morning and water for drinking. I would fill them in town before I settled for the night somewhere.

    Now that I'm older and have achy joints, I travel on a 600 pound adventure bike with panniers, top box and a duffel on the rear seat. all carrying high quality camping gear designed for maximum comfort. But in reality I mostly just stop at a hotel at the end of the day. Only deploy the camping gear when I find that "perfect" spot.

    The old days were more simply and just as fun if not a little funner :-)
    #58
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  19. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra

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    I carried something close to that setup for desert camping for years. I carried a 3/4 length Thermarest which is probably a little smaller and lighter than the Exped. Also, if you oversize the Tyvek ground sheet (mine was around 8'X10') you can ditch the extra tarp and during crummy weather it can serve as a tarp/ground cloth.
    [​IMG]
    This setup seems to drive some inmates crazy as they are worried the tarp will catch a gust of wind and topple the bike over on me. To placate them, don't do it in wind and use something else like the fence posts if available. :fpalm

    Here's the mosquito net I carried with that setup:
    https://www.campmor.com/c/coghlans-hikers-mosquito-net-86660
    Only weights 5 ounces
    #59
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  20. bnschroder

    bnschroder Adventurer

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    [​IMG]
    Hammock, extra large tarp, pad and sleeping bag - I like being off the ground


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    #60