Camping without a tent?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by Biddles, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. advantagecp

    advantagecp Adventurer

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    I hiked 1100+ miles of the Appalachian Trail this year, about half with a good tent (Big Agnes Fly Creek II) and half with a good hammock (Warbonnet Blackbird XLC). For me, the hammock was better in every way, but most importantly it is far more comfortable. I am 58. In the hammock I could sleep for hours at a stretch. Not so on the ground or in a shelter. I used a good inflatable sleeping pad, which I transferred to my hammock in lieu of spending extra money on an underquilt. Worked fine.
    #61
  2. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    Cool.
    I'm 59 and when my back went out 7 yrs ago i thought my camping days were over. Then my wife bought me a hammock for fathers day. I set it up in the back yard and layed down. About 2 hours later Brooke woke me up. Best sleep id had in months.
    On our next camping trip i took the hammock. Now she has the tent to herself. For me its a combination of, comfort and not being on my hands and knees crawling in and out of a tent. I also love, LOVE, being able to sit under my tarp and watch the rain fall while boiling up a spot of tea. [​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-T713 using Tapatalk
    #62
  3. HarveyM

    HarveyM Been here awhile

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    In respect to the OP's needs (hope he enjoyed his trip!) the idea of getting a hammock, tarp setup (at some general outdoors store?) for his next day camping trip seems to be a poor way to convert him...
    #63
  4. Al Tuna

    Al Tuna NSFW

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    20 dollar wally world tent, strap to bike, setup, sleep, throw in trash when done.
    #64
  5. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    I'm doing a paddling trip on lake Powell in a few months. I'm a hammock guy, but having been there before I remember there being almost no trees. Looking for configuration ideas for my Noah 12 tarp. I want to use that and my wife's cot.
    Thanks

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    #65
  6. bnschroder

    bnschroder Adventurer

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    That's clearly the issue in many places out West - no trees. Was just reading a great ride report in Colorado and it struck me how few decent trees there are for hammock camping. Same happened to me on Mt Mitchell on the Blue Ridge - had to find a different campsite to hang my hammock .
    #66
  7. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    Take a couple trekking poles and string the tarp between them. If your paddle is a break-down, you may be able to break it down and stick the ends into the sand rather than use trekking poles.
    #67
  8. cjclint

    cjclint Adventurer

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    Perhaps one of these with your Noah tarp over it.
    #68
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  9. Drwnite

    Drwnite Adventurer

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    Camping without a tent is loitering :rofl
    #69
  10. HarveyM

    HarveyM Been here awhile

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    You can pitch it 'square' instead of 'diamond' fashion, then pull the lower corners across to get a floor-less 'A' frame tent like structure

    Image from hammock forums:
    [​IMG]
    https://theultimatehang.com/2015/08/05/pitching-options-for-a-square-tarp/

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/23053-Kelty-12x12-Noah-s

    Without trees you (probably) need a couple six to eight foot poles (if you're value conscious you can make collapsing ones from different sized ABS pipes)...
    #70
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  11. 04478

    04478 Perishable: best if used before expiration date

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    so I've been told - IMG_20140730_213109.jpg
    #71
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  12. AK2ID

    AK2ID Adventurer

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    Get the best ultralight two person tent you can afford. They are light weight, relatively compact, quick to set up, and offer the most protection for all conditions. They also offer the most privacy for you and security for your gear.

    I have been camping for 60 years (first trip as an infant with parents to Lake City, CO) with the gear getting lighter, stronger and more refined over time. I lived in Alaska for decades and ultralight hiked/camped in harsh conditions. I now camp off my KTM 690 in the remote mountains of Idaho and Montana (see loaded bike to left).

    There are pros and cons for each option - uncovered on the ground, tarp, bivy, hammock or a tent. They all work well when conditions are nice. But if the weather is nasty, the bugs are hungry or the creepy-crawlers are out, a tent works best. Also, a modern tent can be set up and taken down in minutes.

    I have a very humble respect for the western mountains. Conditions can turn nasty in a flash and if not prepared you can be in real trouble. So, I challenge all my gear to perform under harsh conditions, not fair weather. You can test your gear with a few questions...

    - If conditions turn nasty, will you be able to set up your shelter quickly?
    - If you are cold and wet (or injured/sick) will your tent and bag warm you up?
    - Can your shelter be set up anywhere?
    - Will you be protected from the things that will interrupt your sleep such as: rain on your face, wind, bugs, neighbors?
    - Is it lightweight and compact so your bike can be athletic is tricky conditions?

    One last tid-bit: Once your camp is set up and the bike has cooled, drape your riding gear over the bike and cover the bike and gear with a siltarp. Your riding gear and your bike will be dry from rain or dew and you will be much more comfortable in the tent with the extra room.

    This approach works for me but I appreciate that everyone has there own style and approach. Most important, get out and have fun.
    #72
  13. RatAssassin

    RatAssassin Been here awhile

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    I'll do just a tarp set up with a ground cloth, pad and bag.
    But once the bugs get crazy, I'll go to my hammock or my smaller tents with mesh.

    I believe the tarp I use is 10 oz. Marmot Arete bag and a small packable air mattress. Just about 2.5 lbs or so.
    #73
  14. nordicbiker

    nordicbiker Been here awhile

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    There are some regions in the world - like here in Scandinavia aft
    er a wet spring- where you really wouldt enjoy camping without a completely closed tent. I also have some bad memories from Ontario. In both places you would probably be dry like an egyptian mummy next morning, with that amount of bugs in the air!
    #74
  15. Mac Ka

    Mac Ka Been here awhile

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    love this stuff.............DD travel hammock (Scotland) which is a waterproof pole less ground tent or hammock, plus DD 3x3 tarp...all in for 3 kilos or so and the size of your Nan's lunch box. Add a Jetboil for drinks and even an R1 rider wouldn't notice the extra ounces.
    #75
  16. Lafayette

    Lafayette Adventurer

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    two man hooch is a tent, technically but because of its lack of floor its a breeze to setup and provides decent shelter, if I was going lite its an option i would consider.
    #76
  17. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    We carry bike covers and put all of our riding gear inside our panniers or on the bike seat and then cover the bikes. Tent is for SLEEPING..it's small, just enough room to keep a couple of folks who like each others company. I have a Noahs tarp...watched all the videos...I still can't figure a way to hoist it up. I have a coupe of poles and a mile of string. YES...I use it...it's a great rain barrier...but I'm forever walking around pushing it up so the rain flows away. One year at D2D our site was very popular in the rain as a gathering spot...even with the dripping tarp.
    #77
  18. ferals5

    ferals5 Team black bikes

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    I’m sorta tempted with this... not light weight but as sidesleeper does it have merit :ear
    besides needing 50% more trees I’m liking the big flat triangle. Removable fly only covers the triangle like a tent.

    Specifications
    Setup Size 2.8 x 2.8 x 1.6m / 9 x 9 x 5ft
    Weight 2.3kg / 5lbs
    Maximum Load 150kg / 330lbs
    Floor Area:
    2.2sqm / 24sqf
    Doors:1
    Head Height: 60cm / 2ft
    Maximum Capacity:1 adult and their gear

    C7300FE4-697A-44A3-B5E6-AB6D6038A0C6.jpeg
    85AB7C92-56E3-463B-8DB3-15487DB11B35.png
    #78
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  19. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

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    And in lack of trees, looks like it could be a ground-based tent. Very interesting. Do you have a link or company name?
    #79
  20. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    #80
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