Can I expect a new Zumo for 2018?

Discussion in 'Mapping & Navigation' started by NJEnduroBiker, Oct 29, 2017.

  1. NJEnduroBiker

    NJEnduroBiker '13 Super Tenere

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    Sorry if this has already been discussed.

    The 595 LM was announced in February 2016.
    Garmin seems to introduce new models (or upgrades) every 2 years or so.

    My Zumo 550 has served me well for ~9 years but is on its last legs.
    Wondering if I should wait til Spring to see if anything new will be available.

    TIA,
    Brian
    #1
  2. Major_Zero

    Major_Zero Adventurer

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    I was hoping somebody had this info as well.
    #2
  3. NJEnduroBiker

    NJEnduroBiker '13 Super Tenere

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    Thanks for the bump!

    I can't believe nobody chimed in with so much as speculation.

    Well I don't ride in the Winter anyway so I'm going to wait and see what happens.
    #3
  4. VStromNC

    VStromNC DNS/DNF

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    I also had a Zumo 550 for about 8 to 9 years. No problem or issues as far as I can remember other than breaking the cradle on a getoff on my KLX450. I used it in conjuction with Mapsource.

    Last year, I finally upgrade to Zumo 590 as I wanted to try tracks and never looked back. My Zumo 590 does everything that my old Zumo 550 did and more including tracks. The Zumo 550 converted tracks to routes meaning it did not handle native tracks. I use my Zumo as a communication hub as it can do gps, phone calls, mp3 all to my headset Packtalk while I ride.

    I had to modify the 590 cradle cable posted somwhere in these gps threads and works fine. A buddy of mine just got a Zumo 595 and it appears identical other than few features like being able to select curvy roads automatically and has a cool weather interface that bluetooth off your phone.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    #4
  5. NJEnduroBiker

    NJEnduroBiker '13 Super Tenere

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    Just a bump to see if anyone has heard anything.

    Garmin doesn't market the 276Cx as a motorcycle GPS so I'm hopeful that something is in the works.

    Spring is coming...........hopefully soon!
    #5
  6. chrisjk

    chrisjk Been here awhile

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    What do you want a new one to do that the previous ones can't?
    #6
  7. NJEnduroBiker

    NJEnduroBiker '13 Super Tenere

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    Possibly nothing, maybe just some refinements, maybe Garmin is working on something we haven't even thought about?
    If my Zumo wasn't acting up I wouldn't be in the market for a new unit.
    However, since my Zumo lasted ~9 years, and I'm hoping the next will last as long, I would prefer to start with a new model.

    Garmin's "current" model is ~2 years old and I don't think it's unreasonable to expect that an update or new model is due, if not overdue.
    #7
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  8. lkraus

    lkraus Been here awhile

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    The newest Zumo-like model is the Navigator VI. Considering the problems they still have getting that model to work as advertised, I'd stay away from a NEW model. Though if they did announce something newer, you could probably pick up a 595 for a good price.
    #8
  9. NJEnduroBiker

    NJEnduroBiker '13 Super Tenere

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    Thanks, good points to be considered.
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  10. petertakov

    petertakov Adventurer

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    How did standalone GPS units have survived so far is beyond me. They are slow, expensive, unstable and functionally limited and yet there are people who still buy them. I guess habit is a strong persuader :-)
    #10
  11. Marcham

    Marcham Been here awhile

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    They are waterproof, fuelproof, sunlight readable, glove compatible with dual Bluetooth radios... That is what sets them apart.

    Sent from my SM-T700 using Tapatalk
    #11
  12. NJEnduroBiker

    NJEnduroBiker '13 Super Tenere

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    I have tried using 2 different smart phones as GPS and wasn't really happy with the experience.
    I spent quite a bit of time trying to figure out how to do that in google maps and I never found an easy way to do it.

    I find it very easy to create routes in mapsource and upload them to my zumo.

    I also had a problem with vibration and the usb connection which killed my first old smart phone in less than 1,000 miles.

    I might consider giving it another try though.

    What phone set up are you using?
    And how do you keep it charged and waterproof?
    And what mapping app do you use?
    #12
  13. NJEnduroBiker

    NJEnduroBiker '13 Super Tenere

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    Yes!!!
    And vibration proof and the cradle provides a better power supply than a USB connection.

    And I agree that they are expensive, but I think I paid ~$800 for my Zumo and it lasted ~9 years which IMO is good value.
    I don't have a problem spending good money for something that provides good benefits.
    #13
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  14. petertakov

    petertakov Adventurer

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    I m using whatever phone I have at the moment - currently a Moto X Style with 5.7 inch screen. I put the phone in a case like this one - keeps it dry and detached from vibrating parts. The screen on this one is brighter and much clearer than any Garmin out there. You can operate it with your gloves if they are compatible with capacitive screens but I don't consider a good idea fiddling with your device while riding and don't consider much of a hassle taking my gloves off when I stop. Obviously any phone today has Bluetooth and all kinds of connections and hands free, including voice control and the Google one has become amazingly good.

    I use a car charger in a cigarette lighter connector because if the charger gives up I can buy a new one in the next petrol station. Due to it's location the charger remains completely dry when I'm on the move. I can always detach the cable and run on batteries if I need to stand still in the rain but can't imagine in what scenario I would have to do it.

    I am generally using OSMand - it is by far the best app for my needs (offline maps updated once a month and generally more detailed than anything else (OSM), displaying AND navigating GPX tracks, completely configurable map and navigation display (choosing POI to display, turning off between turns, size of letters and icons, colours ... anything you can think of and you lot of thinks that are quite useful and you didn't even think about :-) I also use Google Maps sometimes for the better search function and the ratings of places I am not familiar with. GM also has a better traffic infor. But that is the nice thing about using apps - you can choose whatever suits you best instead of having to adapt to whatever Garmin or TomTom think is best for you.
    #14
  15. petertakov

    petertakov Adventurer

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    There is a very easy solution to vibration - you just avoid direct hard connection between the handlebar and the device by using a case like the one from my previous post. It automatically solves the waterproofness and USB connection issues as well. In terms of electrical power USB is exactly the same as any other connection, including the one from the cradle.
    #15
  16. NJEnduroBiker

    NJEnduroBiker '13 Super Tenere

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    Thanks for the info!
    I'll have to spend some time looking into this.
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  17. motoreiter

    motoreiter Long timer

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    I don't understand this statement...it sure seems that a power connection through a USB connection would be much more susceptible to vibration than the power connection provided by a cradle?
    #17
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  18. PeterInMD

    PeterInMD Adventurer

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    My 665 served me as well, but like you, I am interested in the 595 for an upgrade. I'm hoping that the 590 handles my preplanned Basecamp routes better than my 665. Especially if it honors the "Won't Alert" attribute.
    #18
  19. PeterInMD

    PeterInMD Adventurer

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    Can you create a route on your laptop (assuming windows) with specific waypoints, send it to your device, and will your device follow the pre-planned route? If so, what tool do you use to create your route?
    #19
  20. smbjm

    smbjm Been here awhile

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    "I'm hoping that the 590 handles my preplanned Basecamp routes better than my 665."

    I have had a Z550, Z660 and currently a Z590. I will say that the Z590 or 595 will not handle pre-planned routes better than the 660. But, I found the 550 and 660 handled complex pre-planned routes perfectly well once I figured out how to create routes that the GPS would follow. For me some of the keys are to use enough routing points (either shaping or via points), to have all the settings in the GPS the same as in BaseCamp as much as possible, to have all avoidances off in both The GPS and BC and to use fastest route in both the GPS and BC.

    The 590/595 and other newer GPS units use different routing software and will treat skipped or missed viapoints differently which takes some getting used to.
    #20