Can I use pre cast concrete blocks footings, to build..??

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Ricardo Kuhn, Oct 27, 2013.

  1. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2001
    Oddometer:
    12,677
    Location:
    Salt lake city, Utah
    I was trying to avoid this approach if possibles since I don't trust my measuring/digging skills and the concrete do give me a little wiggle room just in case I mess up a little....
    #21
  2. Laconic

    Laconic Anodyne

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    18,820
    Location:
    Recalculating...

    That all sounds good, in theory. I can tell you from experience (bitter experience) that it's not that easy. Every one of those 4x4 posts will have to be perfect, otherwise you'll have a clusterfuck on your hands. The blocks have imperfections that will cause your posts to not be plumb. Also, because the blocks have a hole where the posts go, you can't just slip them in and out like it might seem. 4x4 posts sitting in those pockets don't offer any lateral stability, either.

    This is a plastic, 15x8 shed? What does the floor structure look like? You might be better served to set 3 stringers on concrete piers opposite the floor structure and just drag the shed up onto it with a tractor, comealongs, etc..., it can't be that heavy.

    Or, since it's plastic, grade the area, put down some crusher run and set the shed right on the ground.
    #22
  3. troidus

    troidus Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    16,715
    The OP's shed is plastic. Mine's wood, and whoever set it didn't put any supports down the middle, so it sags. It'll take awhile to un-sag after it is moved. I also have a slope, but I don't think mine is as steep as the OP's.
    #23
  4. Laconic

    Laconic Anodyne

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    18,820
    Location:
    Recalculating...
    Oh, got mixed up, too many sheds. :D

    Anyway, I'd stay away from those pier blocks.
    #24
  5. baloneyskin daddy

    baloneyskin daddy bikaholic

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,177
    Location:
    southcentral PA.
    I sat both of my sheds on railroad ties.The one is over 20 yrs old now and a few years ago I pulled it off the ties to repaint it and put a new roof on it and the ties were still in good shape.Hooray for creosote.
    #25
  6. ABHooligan

    ABHooligan The Flying Mythos

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,189
    Location:
    Chattanooga
    This is what I would do. Cheap, effective. If the shed settles over time, jack up the low spot and shim it. I think y'all are overengineering the project-it's a plastic shed, not a house.
    #26
  7. Canuman

    Canuman Crusty & Unobliging

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,674
    Location:
    The Palace of the People, VT
    I've built a couple of sheds on supports that I made myself using a 5 gallon drywall bucket as a form, Sacrete mixed in a wheelbarrow, and four sticks or re-bar in each. I used PT 4x4 for posts. Just make sure the surface where each support is placed is level. These buildings tend to move a little over a winter, but not nearly as much as a sonotube. You can re-level by shimming if low or simply jumping on the high spot. A water level should help you get within "close enough" for this application. They're reasonably cheap to buy, or you can make your own. Everything I did had a pier at 4' on center, and it worked out fine.
    #27
  8. mac85

    mac85 Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 29, 2013
    Oddometer:
    68
    Location:
    Cambridge, MA
    ^ This. Rent an auger from HD. The one on a trailer ideally, no reaction torque to rip your arms off. Cast an anchor bolt into each one and use a galvanized metal post/beam support. You can shim under these as necessary.
    #28
  9. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,386
    Location:
    Central CT
    First, a 15x8 plastic shed? :ear Who makes it? Do you have a link?

    Secondly, I'm with Slackmeyer. If you don't want to dig holes and use Sonotubes, and have something you can pick up and move, the skids are the way to go (most commercial built sheds use them). I built a lightweight 4'x6' chicken coop and put it on four solid concrete blocks (the type they put under oil tank legs), 3 are fine, one continuously sinks.
    It won't sink or frost heave with the skids (do you have frost in SLC?).
    Also, If you get a woodchuck digging below your shed, you can easily move the shed to make it easier to, erm, evict it.
    #29
  10. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2001
    Oddometer:
    12,677
    Location:
    Salt lake city, Utah
    Sorry here is the link to the
    Lifetime shed..
    [​IMG]

    I sincerely don't see the need to move the shed plus is not like I can get a "tractor" in the garden hell not even a crane since we have a bunch pf high voltage wires above the patio, on the other side I do like the idea of a continues foot print to spread the load even better, but I'm afraid the whole thing will slide downwards..

    For sure to many options to think about..
    #30
  11. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    56,062
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    I have my 8X10 plastic shed on 9 8X16 cinder blocks, and have for over a year. It is plenty strong enough. For your use I wouldn't hesitate to use the precast shed blocks. Mine is on plain dirt, no footer at all and it never moves.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Jim :brow
    #31
  12. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2001
    Oddometer:
    12,677
    Location:
    Salt lake city, Utah
    Thanks Jim very comforting plus really easy to accomplish too..:clap
    #32
  13. Cogswell

    Cogswell Spudly Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,783
    Location:
    Riding with my pal Richard Cranium
    Looks good Jim !

    This is what I was trying to describe previously. With the exception of having some PT dimensional lumber (4x4) laid lengthwise between the blocks and framed floor support. Kind of like "skids" :D

    Mike
    #33
  14. Patriot4570

    Patriot4570 Trail Blaster

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2002
    Oddometer:
    2,783
    Location:
    First Coast
    Nice looking yard.What is that grass type? I have St.Augustine here in NE. Florida.
    #34
  15. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    56,062
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    Thanks, it is Tall Fescue grass. This was only 3 months fresh planted, so there were a few spots. It looked like this in July:

    [​IMG]

    That photo was taken in October.

    Jim :brow
    #35
  16. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2001
    Oddometer:
    12,677
    Location:
    Salt lake city, Utah
    Well finally I finish the platform, I just hope I did it right or sufficiently right at least..

    I triangulate everything as best as possible.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    OSB ply.
    [​IMG]

    Also as a transportation tip, I used three small 2x4 scraps to hold the plywood on top of my rack, works perfectly, no movement or lifting at all, for the mile ride home.
    [​IMG]
    #36
  17. Skyshadow

    Skyshadow Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2014
    Oddometer:
    637
    Location:
    By the hemlock tree on top of a hill
    In Utah, you probably have a thin organic layer over Mivida soils. If this is the case you are in luck as Mivida is a sandy soil with very limited clay or organics....basically solid stuff to build on without much heaving or sinking.

    If I were you, dig till you hit sandy stuff, if shallow, drop the blocks on it directly, if not backfill the holes with gravel or non organic fill. :deal
    #37
  18. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2001
    Oddometer:
    12,677
    Location:
    Salt lake city, Utah
    Sadly to me Dirt is dirt, the only thing I know is that for the from blocks I dig about 1 1/2' deep and was super hard to do even when the ground was wet, so hopefully it will stay stable over time..
    #38
  19. Jnich77

    Jnich77 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2012
    Oddometer:
    838
    Location:
    Orlando Fl
    All this talk about strength and you used OSB for the floor? lol

    I know it is a little to late, and might have been previously covered, but you never want wood to touch concrete if you can help it (especially in a moist, outdoor environment). I usually put piece of a shingle (or something similar) in between the footer and 4x4.


    Good idea to triangulate the rear legs, looks plenty strong. :D
    #39
  20. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2001
    Oddometer:
    12,677
    Location:
    Salt lake city, Utah
    What is better plywood..!? I just did not think it was necessary, I was just trying to keep the cost down..
    Oh man I have no idea about that aether, hopefully is not a big deal, thanks for the advice.
    At last I did something right, well at least if slides, will slide together..
    #40