Can You Really Go Home Again (Part 2)

Discussion in 'Day Trippin'' started by ORexpat, Jul 1, 2013.

  1. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    You're welcome, sir!
    #21
  2. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    NoVa rider's got his new screen saver . . . :clap

    Appreciate all the views and comments. Hard to predict how a ride to your old home town will be seen by others . . . . .
    #22
  3. Rutabaga

    Rutabaga Been here awhile

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    Absolutely enthralling in every way for me; the journey returning to your childhood years and the locations of prior homesteads, your parents history in those areas, their workplaces, friends like Mary Ellen. Threads in the tapestry that become a treasure to possess and share. I certainly hope you enjoyed the return trip to your home area as much as I enjoyed my first visit. Thank you.
    #23
  4. thumperpilot

    thumperpilot Thumper Pilot

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    Nice report.

    Thanks for sharing!

    .
    #24
  5. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    Wow, thanks for the kind comments. I'm really glad you enjoyed the story. There's not much ultra macho mud bogging, cliff climbing, or canyon jumping action. But really, most of us don't ride like that anyway.

    Riding the GS through my old "stomping grounds" was both a thrill, and liberating. For me at least, I did go back.

    Glad you liked it!
    #25
  6. Porcupine224

    Porcupine224 Been here awhile

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    Its the storyteller that makes the story.
    Your remembrances and recollections are the stuff we are made of.

    I grew up in Miami and on my last visit there was even less still there.
    Where I used to plink with the .22, its surrounded by 10 miles of housing now. Oh and still no mountain views.
    After 35 years there, I only miss the Bay.

    And you with your new friends, they seem sorta sober too. WOW!

    Thanks for a view from the West World.
    #26
  7. Quackersnacker

    Quackersnacker Style points -10

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    Wow!
    Couldn't stop from the first picture I saw. Love those roads in EO, been on many of 'em but your story and accompanying pics were fantastic.:clap
    #27
  8. Shaggie

    Shaggie Unseen University

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    lovely report and pics!

    i like your style :-)

    cheers

    Shane
    #28
  9. Tee Arr

    Tee Arr Team Falldown

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    I've really enjoyed reading your report, and I'd like to throw in my 2 cent's worth. John Day must have been a well traveled and memorable dude. I've run into several hills, streets, creeks, etc. named after him over the years, all over the western U.S. I'm in Mendocino County, and there's a John Day hill here with a road over it, leading to a lumber mill that is long gone.
    #29
  10. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    Porcupine, thank you for the compliment, and the insights. I surely enjoyed riding with you guys back in Virginia. Still think you ought to make a trip out this way some year; lots to see, lots of roads to ride. The "Hollister Imitation" put on by those two airhead riders was hilarious. But, more to the debauchery point, I've discovered a 6th and 7th microbrewery a few minutes from my house . . . and one of 'em's connected with a distillery. Now there's a reason to make it out here!!

    Wow, thanks! You guys (well, guys/gals . . . ) don't know how much your kind words mean. Makes the effort of putting a ride report together, however poorly, worth it.

    Shane, thanks! I suspect the wet side of the mountains compares to your part of the world; I love the almost "instantaneous" transition from wet to dry here in the northwest.

    So much to see, so close to home.
    #30
  11. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    :rofl:rofl:rofl

    Interesting! I've never run across any other John Day's other than the one's connected with the river and town in eastern Oregon. Guess I need to get out more! There's so many cool places to visit and interesting people to meet in our wide country; no way I'll see all of it!


    From Wikipedia: (Most things I've read about the original trapper are in general agreement with this article. I've no way to know if all the details are right . . . ).
    John Day (trapper)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search
    For other uses, see John Day (disambiguation).
    <table class="metadata plainlinks ambox ambox-style ambox-No_footnotes" style=""> <tbody><tr> <td class="mbox-image"> [​IMG]
    </td> <td class="mbox-text" style="">This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please improve this article by introducing more precise citations. <small>(October 2009)</small> </td> </tr> </tbody></table> John Day (ca. 1770 – February 16, 1820) was an American hunter and fur trapper in the old Oregon Country — the area then jointly occupied by the United States and Great Britain, including present-day Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Western Montana and Southern British Columbia.
    Biography

    John Day was born in Culpeper County, Virginia and came west through Kentucky and to Spanish Upper Louisiana (now Missouri) by 1797. In late 1810, he was engaged as a hunter for the Pacific Fur Company's Overland Expedition (sometimes called the Hunt Party or Astor Expedition), traveling west from Missouri to Fort Astoria at the mouth of the Columbia River in 1811-1812. He is best known, along with Ramsay Crooks, for being robbed and stripped naked by Indians on the Columbia River near the mouth of the river that now bears his name in Western Oregon. After finally making their way to Fort Astoria in April, Day was assigned to accompany Robert Stuart back east to St. Louis in June 1812, but was left on the Lower Columbia River where he is said to have gone mad. He returned to Fort Astoria and spent the next eight years hunting and trapping mainly in the Willamette Valley and what is now southern Idaho. John Day died February 16, 1820 at the winter camp of Donald MacKenzie's Snake Country Expedition in what is now the Little Lost River valley in Butte County, Idaho.
    His name is well-remembered, being attached to the John Day River and its four branches in eastern Oregon, as well as the cities of John Day and Dayville in Grant County, Oregon, and a smaller river and unincorporated community in Clatsop County, Oregon, the John Day Dam on the Columbia River, and the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. The Little Lost River, Idaho, was previously known as "Day's River" and the valley was called "Day's Defile" during the fur trade era.
    #31