Cannonball! Coast to Coast on a '28 Indian

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by rtwdoug, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. davesupreme

    davesupreme grand poobah

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    back in the day, when i was in the navy in 1979-80, we used to go to Subic Bay Naval Base in the Philippines regularly. there was a guy there in subic, Toby.... he was in all the harley chopper magazines back then. he had a boneyard outside of town full of WWII era military harleys and indians. from what i remember, it was real hip to have a Toby renovated hard tail..... he had a metric buttload of original parts for these old bikes.... he used to drive around Olongapo on this full faired, painted up, and dingleballed electraglide, looking like all the jeepneys.....just tried to google it, but couldn't find anything.... he's probably dead by now.... we went to his place once, w/a pretty good buzz on if i remember correctly....:wink::freaky he was proud to show you his scars, had some bike gang stab him about 10 times, probably did somebody a bad deal.... Mayor Gordon at the time got the navy to patch the guy back up, pretty ugly really.....

    is this still known in the old bike world? probably a killer source of stuff if it is still there.... his place was like a museum....
  2. OaklandStrom

    OaklandStrom Long timer

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    :clap Oh hell yes.
  3. perryg114

    perryg114 Adventurer

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    I think some of the failures were due to old parts but some of it is just plain old engineering and materials were not that great almost 100 yrs ago. Back then, 10,000 miles on a bike was probably a lifetime. Even today it is uncommon to find a used bike with more than 10,000 miles on it. Cross country on these bikes when they were new they may have experienced the same types of failures.

    Perry

  4. Escaped

    Escaped Been here awhile

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    Looks like he stopped for Burger King :evil

    This SpotWalla is like the Trueman Show :lol3

  5. RhinoVonHawkrider

    RhinoVonHawkrider Long timer

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  6. rgiroux

    rgiroux Invisible Man

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    awesome! he went to Monument Valley after all! :clap
  7. ObiJohn

    ObiJohn Screaming Banshee

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    When I was a kid, I bought my first car, a '57 Ford Fairlane 500. I found it during my afternoon paper route, just visible in a garage, owned by an old lady but it obviously hadn't been driven for years. I asked if she wanted to sell the car when I went to pick up my payment but she declined, only to call me back a couple of weeks later... in her cups. In retrospect she was alone and lonely and it gave her a chance to talk to someone. The brakes were frozen and the car wouldn't start, so it was a real adventure towing it home! After a few weeks, a lot of elbow grease, and a little money, I was finally able to fire her up and listen to the sound of that glorious 2-bbl V-8. I paid $10 for it, put another $20 into it for misc parts and fixin's, but then had to sell it when my dad lost his job and we had to move. We couldn't take it with us, we were moving 250 miles and the tires were dry-rotted. My dad didn't want to chance breaking down on the road with it, so I sold it to a used car dealer for $50... but that would have been a great car for high school.

    My next several cars were all fixer-uppers, and I got to be a pretty decent mechanic. I spent the fall of my senior year in high school rebuilding a '71 Pinto's 1.6L engine... bought the car off of a shrimp fisherman for $200, brought it home, changed the oil, and drove it to school and back the next thee days, and on the third day the oil light came on! My friends called it 'The Mosquito Fogger' and you could tell where I'd driven by following the smoke trail, hence the rebuild. It cost me $400 in parts and machining, including a new cylinder head because the three I found in the junkyards around the town I lived in were all cracked, like mine was... and the auto shop machinist told me that I could keep spending money to help the junkyards screen their crap or spend a little more and be done with it. I learned how to shift that car with a large screwdriver when the shifter pulled out of the transmission, to get home from a 90-mile trip to the beach on a school day. Or, when I went with a couple of friends to canoe the Buffalo River, filling the tank up for the first time since I bought the vehicle and then driving on to the ferry... and as we stood around crossing the Mississippi someone looked down and saw liquid coming from my car. I got down on my hands and knees and looked under the vehicle and saw gasoline POURING from the rust holes in the fuel tank just above the halfway line... and then got up and prayed that no one dropped a cigarette! Yes, we made it to the Buffalo River and back (almost a thousand miles round-trip), and I never filled her up again! Sold the Pinto to buy a '71 Firebird with a '68 389 out of a GTO in it... then had to buy a new transmission shortly thereafter (and AAMCO wouldn't warranty the rebuild behind that engine!). Until I learned to control myself I had to pull the intake manifold off of the engine every once in a while and re-install the hydraulic lifters that got thrown out onto the valley cover. Finally traded that in on a brand-new '82 Prelude, but bought an old IH Scout Traveler in the mid-80s and a used CJ-7 a few years later that I completely replaced the drivetrain in, swapping in a Chevy 4.3L V6 and NV4500 transmission to replace the Iron Duke 4cyl.

    To be honest, I got tired of always having to fix my vehicles before having fun with them, or shortly thereafter. I've pretty much been buying new, and now go to Jiffy Lube to get the oil changed. My motorcycles are new, also, and while I can fix things on the road it is my express intention to never have to, because I grew tired of the night-time roadside fixes decades ago. (Yes, I do change the oil on the bikes and do minor maintenance, but when I'm not working I want to ride, not wrench.)

    What has that got to do with this thread? It's about the bright side to the Dark Side. I can admire runs like the CB on old bikes, and the riders also... but I'd rather have to work on a bike because I wanted to instead of because I had to. Enjoy that Kawi, Doug, and how the worst thing about it is the time you don't spend fixing it instead of riding it! That's the bright side!
  8. bigequip

    bigequip Ol' fart riding

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    Where are you headed tomorrow, Colorado or N. New Mexico? :clap
  9. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Long timer

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    I can understand that. I have spent too much time on the side of the road playing mechanic, on both cars and motorcycles. Back in those days, cars and bikes were much easier to fix than they are now, but they needed fixing a lot more often. Changing the points, condensors, and plugs in your car on a sub-freezing morning so you can go to work is not much fun. I travel Hwy 50 in TN a lot, and there is this one place where I once had to pull over because my water pump was gone. Hitched a ride back to town, bought a new WP, hitched back to the car....that was a long day.

    It all just makes the resolve and determination of guys like Doug that much more admirable. Doug, you are a man among men. Good job!
  10. bk brkr baker

    bk brkr baker Long timer

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    Just about now, Doug is passing 12 miles south of the Dorsey Mansion in New Mexico.

    [​IMG]

    I was there 3 years ago on a trip. It was built by Senator Stepen Dorsey who was a known carpetbagger after the War of Northern Aggresion. He made enough on some shady deals to buy a large chunk of land in New Mexico and started the log portion of the house in 1878. Later he added the sandstone portion around 1884.
    The house had a 60 guest dining room and an 8 hole outhouse. In the yard he built an in ground swimming pool with 3 islands and a gazebo.

    [​IMG]


    Dorsey founded the town of Clayton , N.M. which was named for his son.

    The house was featured on the SyFy Scariest places on Earth show.

    Ride safe, Doug. Don't pick up any hitchhikers on the way to Clayton !
  11. olderigetfasteriam

    olderigetfasteriam Adventurer

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    Mayor Gordon's brother owned a restaurant in the small town in Illinois where I grew up. Oddly enough my brotherinlaw reminded me of this very fact a week ago when we visitied Illinois. Kind of freaky and very cool. Thanks.
  12. Patrick46

    Patrick46 visionary

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    I remember reading an article about this guy & place in Sleazyriders back in the late 70's or early 80's.
  13. rtwdoug

    rtwdoug prominent underachiever

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    bummer I didnt know about the mansion when I was in springer, woulda been cool to see

    I'm in lovely Clayton NM tonite. they rolled the sidewalks up for the night before I arrived.

    I'm at the extravagant Santa Fe Trail Inn, one of the shabbiest fleabag motels I have ever stayed in (in the US)

    They have everything!
    junk cars & crap piled in the parking lot

    lots of stray cats fighting outside the room

    the parking was actually paved at one time

    But I cant get the bike in the room, as its too wide.

    luckily, as all the restaurants in town are closed, there is a dollar general right next door, so I could find some tasty treats for dinner.

    DG is one of those great chain stores that has stuff that looks like brand name, but it doesnt taste as good.

    its like a cheap crappy smaller walmart

    I love travelling! :lol3
  14. rtwdoug

    rtwdoug prominent underachiever

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    I've had several people ask if my cannonball shirts are still available.

    I had quit getting them after the IMS shows were over, but if enough folks want one, I can get some more made (I have to order 25 minimum)

    so, if anyone wants one, send me a PM.
    If I get enough interest, I'll get another batch printed

    they are 20 bucks shipped in the US, 22 bucks shipped anywhere else.

    Thanks, Doug
  15. GhostRiderFC

    GhostRiderFC Just a guy who rides

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    I can't believe you went to Clayton on purpose. I'm sure it was out of the way a bit, but I'd have put you up for nothing just north of Albuquerque. (Yeah, I know... too little too late. Sorry.)

    Meanwhile, it's been a real good time reading about your Cannonball adventure. Are you still planning to get to South America this year?

    Hope to see you on the road sometime.
    CJ
  16. Old and slow

    Old and slow Adventurer

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    Whoa! Highest point in Oklahoma on your left today! Black Mesa, 4973'
  17. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    Hey Doug, just a thought, but if there is a whole lot of interest AND your shirt vendor can add to the screens he used, maybe add something simple to the second batch like "Completed". Or some such catchy notation.

    We had some one-off shirts done on a ship I served on to commemorate a hurricane evasion sortie that only half the crew sailed on and only that half could get the shirts. An enterprising chief had the shirt shop use the same design with "Who cares?" added to the shirts and tried to sell them to the other half of the crew. :lol3 The XO put a real quick stop to that one.
  18. Abbotson

    Abbotson Been here awhile

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    Hey Doug,

    If your headed throught the southern part of Missouri, US160 is a great east-west highway to ride. The Theodosia Marina-Resort has a motel and Cookie's diner. A nice place for a stop. :thumb

    http://www.tmrbullshoals.net/

    36.573991,-92.654432
  19. WaywardSon

    WaywardSon Long timer

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    +1 on US 160 across the bottom of Missouri...nice road & pretty country. Take it across to Poplar Bluff & then 60 to the confluence of the Mississippi & Ohio Rivers at Cairo, IL. Go from Missouri to Illinois to Kentucky in a couple of minutes. Another half hour on 60 & you are in Paducah, KY & my house. You are certainly welcome. Got Dr. Pepper:-)

    Just depends on where you want to make your turn South...I'm a little over 300 miles from Birmingham and usually take 45E down through TN to Corinth & Tupelo, MS...then across on 78 to B'ham.
  20. Patrick46

    Patrick46 visionary

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    how 'bout "Mission Accomplished"! :thumb