Canoe Advice Please-

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwet - Where it's green. And wet.' started by 1911fan, Aug 9, 2014.

  1. Redlabel

    Redlabel Adventurer

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    Have a 16' Mad River Malecite that's been a great canoe. Lightweight and stable....easy for the wife and I to carry, etc. Good luck.
    #21
  2. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    We just bought a Wenohna Minnesota II, 18.5' and in like new condition. $650, though no paddles or PFDs. Should be fun!! Now we're looking for paddles and PFDs, of course.


    1911fan

    PS: Seller rides a KLR650 and I told him abot the WABDR and advrider, hope he logs on.
    #22
  3. WB-PDX

    WB-PDX Long timer

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    That's a great boat for your use, but you'll want to watch the wind, or read up on the effect of moving the center of gravity on wind-age (You said you've sailed dinghy's, so you are probably all set.)

    My new canoe is without a doubt the most special, rare, thing I have ever owned. This would have been custom made by Wenonah. It's a 1998 Kevlar Sundowner 17 with the rib layup (same as UltraLight today,) wood trim, the performance package, but with cane seats (which is something I've never actually seen.) It is in amazing shape, as it has sat in the owner's garage for over 12 years.

    It's also in what I think is the best color Wenonah has ever used; an aquamarine/teal that seems to draw comments from everyone that sees it.

    Came with three beautiful paddles and a few other things.

    It was not cheap, but, since a new one is nearing $3k, so I still feel like I got a deal.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It's actually absurdly close to the color I painted my tuff-weave Sundowner 18, which was a project boat I bought for $300.

    [​IMG]
    #23
  4. hdawg

    hdawg Adventurer

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    Good buy. You will not regret it. We have the Itasca and it carried our two labs, daughter and all of our camping gear for a week (including ice chest). It's kevlar and weighs around 50 to 60 lbs. I can lift it on the roof rack by myself. (with effort). Great canoes. If you haven't paddled before get a book, video, and take a couple of classes, makes a lot of difference. For marriage sakes let the person in front dictate the pace.

    Have fun
    #24
  5. peterman

    peterman cop magnet

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    Hey Roy!,,howdy Bro!

    If you didn't do it,,I was going to,,,I never hear the word 'canoe' without that scene appearing and re-appearing from the first time I rode into town,,I remember thinking,,,"WTF?,,what a waste!"


    My two cents,,,you can poke a hole in any canoe with a sharp enuff rock.
    Repairing along the way could end your day.
    wooden is tuff to fix, plastic is tougher to fix,fiberglass boats can break into pieces,,but aluminum canoes can be patched with epoxy on the spot and will still get you down the river.
    keep your eyes open for one that looks crusty and long time stored. Pull in and ask if they want to sell it.
    I bought a 16 ft. Grumman V-stern for a few hunnert bucks because it sat there, and sat there unused for so long I couldn't stand it anymore! "you ever gonna use that canoe or do you want to sell it right now?!",,,worked for me! :deal
    Should be lots of neglected paddlers in the Wetsnatchee area,,,,
    #25
  6. WB-PDX

    WB-PDX Long timer

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    Royalex (plastic) is easy to fix with 3M MA300 two part epoxy. It takes minutes. If you've put a hole in one, it's probably because it fell off your car at 60+mph, and you likely have bigger problems, but you can fix it on the roadside in no time.

    Fiberglass and Kevlar are easy to repair with any of the two part epoxies you can buy, and proper, larger repairs are easy to make with cloth and epoxy. I like the system that TAP Plastics sells, or you can use WEST. You shouldn't be using fiberglass or Kevlar in swift moving water anyway. Hand laid fiberglass or Kevlar, like you find in a quality canoe, is much harder to shatter than the old chop-gun boats you probably think of when you think fiberglass. Don't buy a chop gun boat, and you can worry far less about the challenges of fixing it.

    Wood can be repaired with fiberglass cloth. Most wood canoes are covered in a layer of e-glass (or canvas.)

    One thing most people don't realize is UV is the enemy of all materials except Aluminum. For a boat that will be stored outside, the only good choice is aluminum.
    #26
  7. Walterxr650l

    Walterxr650l Long timer

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    #27
  8. hugemoth

    hugemoth Long timer

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    I bought an aluminum canoe new in 1971 and still have it. It has always been stored out in the yard in the sun, rain, and snow and has not deteriorated at all. During those 43 years I've also owned an Old Town and a Coleman, both plastic, that showed signs of deterioration after a few years of outdoor storage. Plastic is nice because it's quiet but aluminum will last forever with no maintenance.
    #28
  9. Motomantra

    Motomantra Registered Lurker

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    Remember "Deliverance" ?
    Remember which canoe made it the farthest down the river?
    #29
  10. crackhead

    crackhead Long timer

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    I see that you found a boat (a nice one at that) but I thought I'd throw my .02 in.

    Opinions on canoes vary about as much as they do on bikes. One guy will tell you that "Brand X" makes the tippiest canoe he's ever been in, without telling you how it was loaded, or how drunk his co-paddler was, while another guy can paddle a carbon or kevlar Jensen and tell you it's stable as a pontoon boat (FYI, they are not). Paddle a few around and see what you like. They all handle differently loaded vs unloaded / tandem vs solo/ flat water vs white/ windy vs calm / initial vs secondary stability.

    We have a Mad River Adventure 14 and it is phenomenal for us. Absolutely love it. Tracks like a champ, is relatively fast, non hardcore paddlers love the back rests and it is about as stable (secondary anyways) as it gets. We've paddled it in the salt, fast moving water, and on big lakes.

    We have access to an old Coleman that we use from time to time. It is a bear to do anything with unless it's loaded to the hilt and trimmed correctly. When it is, it's a joy to paddle. Again, they all have their place.

    I love paddling kevlar race rigs, but all boats have their place (and price). Try a few, look at a bunch and figure out what does it for you. I really like Clippers out of Abbotsford BC, but as I said, to each their own.


    Canoes are my second favorite mode of transport, next to the bike. I can take my kids in the canoes.
    #30
  11. Hesaid

    Hesaid Long timer

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    We've got one. Love it. Check out the canoe and kayak thread in shiny things here on ADV. I'll try to post more from home, lunch break is not conducive to indepth posts...


    MV
    #31
  12. Hesaid

    Hesaid Long timer

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    And paddles. Be prepared to spend some money on paddles. Get used to the idea of them costing more than you would think.

    MV
    #32
  13. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    We got the Minnesota II based on the good review on Wenohna canoes on page 1. Haven't take it out yet, we'll be able to this Saturday. We bought inexpensive paddles to start with, figuring this would get us on the lake and we'd learn/upgrade as we go.
    It's probably more canoe than we need, but we want to take the granddaughters, ice chests, and so on in it. We are also looking at going up to Ross Lake, and it looks like maybe a 5-mile paddle? Which we should be up to, by then.
    Looking forward to learning it.

    I'd welcome paddle suggestions.

    1911fan
    #33
  14. WB-PDX

    WB-PDX Long timer

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    Any of the paddle shops should have demo paddles (or new) that they will be willing to let you try. This is definitely a matter of personal preference, and that preference often changes on the conditions and if you are paddling solo or tandem. There are a variety of paddle blade sizes, shaft styles, grip styles, and some people prefer different profiles on the blade face. Then there's materials, durability, and weight. There is no wrong paddle design.

    Your bow paddler should seriously consider a bent shaft paddle, but that's the only recommendation I'll make.

    I use a 100% custom designed-by-me bent shaft paddle that my dad made for me, because after trying dozens of paddles, I couldn't find anything I considered ideal.
    #34
  15. hdawg

    hdawg Adventurer

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    My wife and I both use bent shaft paddles. She has an ultralight paddle. If you go any time or distance, it makes a big difference. Mine is a little heavier but much prettier. Wood and Carbon fiber. Although they are expensive, as other people have told you, a good shop will let you test different paddles. I tested many before I settled on a bent shaft and ultralight. Both of or paddles make paddling comfortable and enjoyable. Just remember, relax it's not a race.
    #35
  16. Hesaid

    Hesaid Long timer

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    I'm sure you'll be happy with the Minnesota. And if you're not, I might be...

    Lemme see, For a little bit of reading about our canoe life, try HERE. That's (one of) Shesaid's blog(s), and she might mention the canoe a time or two. Unfortunately, she tends to exaggerate a bit, and tell stories from a slanted perspective. I tell you, if I was half the idiot she... Wait... If I was half an idiot... Or, no... Ummm... If she was... Er, if one of us was... You know what, I'll just let you read it yourself. There are also some bike tales on there as well, so I'm sure you'll be able to see what I mean about her stretching the truth from time to time.

    I think I managed to post a trip on here, down in "Inmates" as it were. This should be it, Canoeing the Dusy Ershim. Also on this site is the thread of canoe and kayak pics in "Shiny Things", you can check that out HERE.

    Now, about paddles. I'm no expert. And neither is anyone else. As already mentioned, it's a very personal choice. And you'll need to paddle quite a bit with a paddle before you'll know if it's the right choice. We started off with four different paddles from Cabela's. We did a lot of reading on how to choose the right lengths, and then ordered four different lengths covering the ranges we thought we'd need. For the ones we really expected to be using, we got THESE, and for the two that we figured were going to be the wrong sizes, we went cheap and got THESE. And we got one of THESE just in case. We ended up liking the ones we chose, and certainly used them quite a bit, and use them still from time to time. But after putting a little bit of canoeing under our belts, we both sought out new paddles. I got one of THESE and she got a Guide bent shaft canoe paddle. The two cheapies we got? Never used them. I think there was talk of making a lamp out of one of them.

    Here's the thing with paddles: weight. You know how when working out they'll tell you it's not the weight you lift, but the repetitions you do? Now think about paddling a canoe. You're going to me lifting that paddle thousands of times. Ounces that don't seem like much when you're standing in the store, will mean so much more when you've paddled for hours and are still miles from where you need to be. Lightweight costs money, so you want to make sure you've found out what length is right for you before committing, but once you've decided what length and style you want, go ahead and spring for the lighter weight options. She's got the bent shaft paddle, and it really seems to work well for her. She likes using it, and I like that between the bent aspect, and the larger blade than her last paddle, it's gotten her efficiency up, and that makes for a closer match to my own. Easier to go in a straight line now than it was before. Just remember, the bend goes towards the bow. The point is to make the latter half of your stroke more efficient, with the blade more perpendicular to the water than a straight shaft would tend to be.

    Oh, and not that it should be a concern with an 18.5 foot canoe, but you want to make sure that the bow paddler's paddle is too short to allow her to whack you upside the head from her seat. I'm not quite sure how, what with her being up there and facing away, but Shesaid must be able to detect mosquitos landing on me, because more than once she's mentioned that she wished she could reach me with her paddle. So you might want to get some bug repellant also...

    MV
    #36
  17. kwisn

    kwisn One Happy Dog

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    :lol3 IDKWTS
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  18. kiwi_outdoors

    kiwi_outdoors Been here awhile

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    we like our Bell Morningstar 15 ft canoe - all of 56 Lbs dry.
    #38
  19. kwisn

    kwisn One Happy Dog

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    What make?
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