Can't get tire on rim

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Nubetoob87, May 18, 2017.

  1. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Washes hands before going to the bathroom

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    WD40 will get it done if you don't want special tire lube.


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    #41
  2. Roland3

    Roland3 Been here awhile

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    I have not changed more tires than probably most on here but just started doing it about 2 years ago. My expierence is:
    I say avoid any oils like wd40, use water or a light soapy spray that will dry up, you dont want oil between your rim and rubber, It just makes it more likely that the tire will slip on the rim and sheer your valve stem off, especially if you are not using a rim lock. I usually grab my handy spray bottle of simple green and water hanging on my tool box.
    I struggled with the exact same point of getting that last bit of bead over the rim, it is all due to not having enough slack or give in the tire from the opposite side bead being down on the bead of the rim and not up inside the rim, either use clamps or I usually start grabbing the tire from opposite side and pulling up while working the last bit of bead down. I say keep trying and learn how to do it!

    for trouble getting bead to seat, dont go up so high on the PSI, let air out, push bead area off the rim and spray up then air it back up, 40 maybe 50 psi tops, and repeat, it will bead eventually, or some say just ride it and it will bead shortly. I'm all for learning how to do stuff myself
    #42
  3. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Washes hands before going to the bathroom

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    WD40 is not an oil, it evaporates after a few min on the tire and leaves no residue. I probably average changing 2-4 tires per month on my bikes and never experienced any ill effects from the WD in my 20+ years of changing my own tires.
    #43
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  4. stucknarut

    stucknarut Uh oh...

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    WD40 is mostly mineral oil and solvent, according to the MSDS. The solvent evaporates and the mineral oil soaks into the rubber, if that's what you mean by no residue. Your tires, your choice to go with an oily solvent, sounds like it's working for you. I'll stick with the gallon of tire lube that cost about $12 and will last the rest of my life.
    #44
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  5. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Washes hands before going to the bathroom

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    I tried the tire lube, I found it to be messy when compared to WD. It also leaves a residue in between the tire and rim, in high stress applications, this could lead to tire slipping and ripped valve stems.


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    #45
  6. stucknarut

    stucknarut Uh oh...

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    Negatory - tire lube doesn't leave anything but a light powder behind, no concern about tire slip unless you're slapping them back on and hitting the race track (which is why the guy doing tire changes at the track mounts them dry). The problem I've had with WD40 and other solvent/petrochemical sprays is not slippage, it's the opposite - over time it can stick the rubber to the rim and make bead breaking and prying off the old tire a royal PITA.

    Otherwise, if you're using a product that contains water and sodium hydroxide (i.e. lye, commonly found in soaps) you might end up with rust on steel rims, or some pitting on aluminum rims. Over time, that can make taking off and putting on tires a royal PITA. If bad enough, it can cause very slow leaks between the bead and rim. I remove a lot of old, cracked tires from old bikes and it's a chore, so I try to think about the poor bastard who will own the bike in 20 years.
    #46
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  7. Nubetoob87

    Nubetoob87 Adventurer

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    Brought it in to a tire shop, 20 minutes, $40... beads set no problem first try. The guy told me I couldn't do it because of my puny compressor. Makes sense. Maybe next time I'll bring it to a gas station with a air hose and try that.
    Either way this DIY turned out to be a little much for me. I want to learn how to change tires in case I need to change one on the trail. I've never changed a tire before.
    I'm guessing these supermoto tires are a little stiffer than the dirt tires. But anyway, at least I have all the tools I need to change one on the trail if needed... I just hope setting a bead on the trail on dirt tires isn't going to be as hard as this.
    #47
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  8. Schmokel

    Schmokel I got peed on today.

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    I had similar issues when I went to change my first tire. I spent like 4h trying to mount the rear on my DR. Just didn't want to get on the rim. I finally got it and it took something like 75psi to get the bead on. Then like a week later I did the front. The entire job took 11m. I was so puzzled. I hate having to mount my rear tire though.
    #48
  9. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Could be the struggling and straining on it in the first place put a slight kink in the bead.
    If the rims have been powder coated to your colour choice, then that will add some small % to the OD of the rim, and powder coat is not always the slickest slippery thing. Tubeless tyres are very sightly tighter in the bead area.

    As has been beaten to death, in the original problem, you didn't have BOTH sides of the opposite bead right in the bottom of the well. A couple of small blocks of wood will stop them popping out.

    I never refit the valve core until the bead is seated, you can get more volume, more quickly, which seems to help.
    Sometimes, It just going to be a bitch. At least with the tube, how ever badly it fits you can ride out, even if the tyre\tube gets fucked in the process, beats walking.
    If you can push a bike with a flat very far, you can probably carry it out too.

    I'm with the proper tyre lube stuff guys. Rubber contains binders and fillers as well as latex and no doubt synthetic rubbers too. The common binder is oil. Using an oleophilic agent like soap and detergents or other oils, can cause the rubber to break down - not likely to be to the point of disintegration, but enough to eventually make a sticky mess and can make the removal procedure as shitty as fitting has been. At home, it's just a PITA, out on the road it is less pleasant.
    Another reason not to use dish soap is some brands contain caustics\lye, and that can damage and erode bare aluminium.


    I worked for Dunlop many years ago, we always use the proper lube, it was a sacking offence not too but also because it was a millionty times easier.
    My time in the labs, we would test various rubbers for their sensitivity to oils, degreasers and other likely chemicals. They nearly all are.

    Still, we're all grown-ups and indivduals, we make our own decisions, based on facts as we like to think them.
    #49
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  10. Branchbuster

    Branchbuster Been here awhile

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    If you have trouble getting a tire to seat on the bead and not take air try this. Bounce the wheel/tire on the ground in an upright position all the way around a couple of times. Then get a motorcycle tie down strap and run it all the way around the circumference of the tire and snug. Put air to the tire.It can only expand outwards not upwards.It will pop right out and seat...
    #50
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  11. aldend123

    aldend123 Long timer

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    I've had a street tire that just wouldn't seat and required lots of fussing around. Eventually I got close. Kept the compressor on full knowing it was bleeding tons of air out of the beed. Dumped soapy water all over the seams while basically emptying my compresor's tank. And suddenly it jumped up in to place. Point being I think with street tires, every once in a while you have some bad luck. There's definitely a big learning curve too for those difficult times. Keep up the DIY. Wait just long enough until you've forgotten how much this job sucked and try it again :D

    While massive air seems to be the standard fix, I feel like that's the brute force surefire method. Seems like there's room for technique to reduce your dependency on major air.
    #51
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  12. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    Those little (diameter) road wheels suck to change tires on. Try a 21" dirt bike tire. About as easy as mountain bike tire.
    #52
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  13. Bounder

    Bounder ExternallyDisplaced

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    One point that hasn't been mentioned and should be is if you use a good dollop of tyre lube and air the tyre up and the bead pops it POPS! and you can end up with an eyeful of tyre soap which at high speed can do damage apart from being uncomfortable.
    Wear some safety glasses or a face shield if you are trying to seat the bead after using tyre lube.
    #53
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  14. edtheslowrider

    edtheslowrider Been here awhile

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    Can't help with seating the bead.

    Getting a warm tire mounted is soooo much easier. I park the cage in the sun windows up (even helps if it's cloudy)
    and stick the new tire in there while pulling the wheel off the bike.
    Difference, for me, between struggling for 10 minutes or more or popping the tire on as quick as the dismount.
    That warm tire may be more willing when trying to seat the bead.

    Don't give up, learn from your struggles.
    #54
  15. andyman7931

    andyman7931 Adventurer

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    try changing a 10" scooter tire. Thought I'd never get the new one on the rim. So little rubber to flex over the rim.
    #55
  16. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    ^^^^^^^^^^^^That's the fantasy..........the tire in all cases and sizes does not flex or stretch. The proper use of the drop center on the rim and lube is the real trick.
    #56
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  17. LexLeroy

    LexLeroy Nerds Rule

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    Yep, the drop center is the key. For lube I used to use dish soap & water. Then I used RuGlyde from the local Napa store. Then I discovered this stuff -

    [​IMG]

    It stays where you put it and doesn't dry as quickly as RuGlyde. I even carry some in a 1 1/2 oz. pill bottle w/ my dirt bike's tool roll.
    #57
  18. baldman1

    baldman1 Been here awhile

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    So you drag that gallon of lube with you on the trail? WD40 works great and you can get it in small cans for the trail repair.
    #58
  19. fast4d

    fast4d Long timer

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    happened to me!

    had a bead spit some lube into my eye once.
    #59
  20. vintagespeed

    vintagespeed fNg

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    i usually over-inflate and bounce the tire pretty hard on the ground to seat difficult beads. or just ride it, it'll seat.
    #60