Carpenter Talk

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by disconnected, Jan 22, 2016.

  1. Tweaker

    Tweaker ...

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    Mine bit the dust, so to speak, from cutting concrete blocks a couple of years ago. I bought a new 77 and once home, saw the Made in China label. I took it back.

    Sound like me, they need to be durable enough to survive transportation. This may be part why we see comments about their absence from jobsites. Another might be the lack of need for cabinet grade rips outside of shops. I've noticed in the other thread that shop guys have some very different criteria than job rats. I have need to rip dozens of sheets of ply but never does it need to be 1/64th exact, it always gets covered with finished material. I've tried to justify a track saw several times but in the end, chalk line is fine.

    That's an interesting one. I like the negative air pressure idea, why not a larger box fan and why a filter? I've been fighting dust for 30 years sanding floors. Much better now with dust extraction systems but stuff happens. Last month, a hidden air return vent sucked up the concrete dust from slab grinding and sent it throughout the house. Fuck me, thick carcinogenic dust everywhere. Cost $500 in house and air vent cleaners to keep the customer (hopefully) happy.

    A couple of tricks, when blocking doorways, a cloth bedsheet or dropcloth hung with simple thumbtacks is far better than plastic and tape, it lets air pass while trapping dust and won't blow loose every time somebody opens a door on the other side. If you need to clean walls, ceilings, 10' stone hearths or just clear the air, open two windows on opposite sides and use an electric leaf blower to stir it all up and blow it out one-way.
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  2. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    @Tweaker The Filter protects the fan, Sheetrock dust can Kill the bearings in a matter of days and MDF dust catches fire in the motor brushes (like floor dust it smoulders like lava) and Azec dust melts and gums up the shafts. Losing the fan isn’t so bad as there is always another to be found, but listening to it die a slow death is painfull.
    I agree with the bedsheets for a dust barrier and use them all the time, if you dampen them they are even better. But you still have to get the trades to close them when they pass through.
    I have been MadScientisting the last few days on a new blower set up, Ill put up picts when I am done.
  3. boardrider247

    boardrider247 Weekend Anarchist

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    Ok next question.
    Anyone here do a lot of work with laminate sheets like the wilsonart type?
    I am seeing them more and more on jobs and some look pretty decent.
    Any tips or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  4. shippy

    shippy Been here awhile

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    something like this? http://premierbarriers.co.uk/catalog/true-dust-stop-door-p-502.html
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  5. shippy

    shippy Been here awhile

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    is it like this? http://www.resopal.de/?customlang=en
  6. boardrider247

    boardrider247 Weekend Anarchist

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  7. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    Aside from using Melamine for closet dividers and cabinet boxes, and tons of formica tops back in the day.. I have not used any exterior coated sheet stock other the Azek in 4x8 and 4x10 sheets. IMO Azec sheets have issues far beyond their value.
  8. disconnected

    disconnected brap

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    Yes, a lot. What specifically are you wondering?
  9. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

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    Azek looks good but not for long... as soon as the temperature changes you either have gaps or buckles.

    Reminds me of a trip I took to Hawaii for the Store Decor Manufacturer I worked for. They made signs out of expanded polystyrene sheets called "Cintra". Two sheets in an aluminum frame with a piece of styrofoam sandwiched between.
    It was a Woolworth in downtown Honolulu and being on the island they didn't use AC and just left the doors open all the time.
    During the day when the temps got higher, the panels would buckle and puff out, later when they cooled they would get flat again.
    They sent me to fix them... I told them they used the wrong material and should have used Gatorboard and to replace them.
    Had a nice vacation!
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  10. boardrider247

    boardrider247 Weekend Anarchist

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    Does it tollerate temperature changes? Such as in a travel trailer.

    Best way to cut it? I'm assuming normal wood working tools, but you never know.

    Preferred glue? I know Wilson art sells a spray adhesive however I the last job I was on they were using PL premium, cases and cases of the stuff.

    It appears relatively easy to work with. Is this the case or should I just run away and forget about it?
  11. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    @boardrider247 .. Are you talking about the straight laminate or premade structural panels ? I checked out the website and they have a lot of different items I’m not sure which one you are refering to .
    I’m happy to ask on my jobsites
  12. boardrider247

    boardrider247 Weekend Anarchist

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  13. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

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    They would need to be laminated to a substrate. In a travel trailer, you would probably use something like luan I don't know that that would be rigid enough or stable enough in changes of temperature or more importantly humidity and may cause the panel to become un-bonded. The proper adhesive is contact cement and the two surfaces should be rolled to ensure 100% contact and bonding.
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  14. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Washes hands before going to the bathroom

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  15. disconnected

    disconnected brap

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    It's fairly easy. It may take some trial and error to get it right.

    My answers are in above paragraph after the questions, I hope I helped. ;)
  16. Baroquenride

    Baroquenride Everyone dies, but not everyone truly lives.

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    WTF is this?!? It's in the corner of my house and it doesn't go to anything on the other side! The other side is my garage. I haven't yet traced the other end of the wire yet to see what it ties into but that's not really going to tell me anything. I've pulled on it gently and it's not budging at all.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my Etch A Sketch
  17. MrBob

    MrBob Knee-jerk liberal

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    Spend a fe
    Spend a few bucks on a circuit sensor, which will tell you if the line is hot.
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  18. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

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    What is the wall covering in the garage? Maybe someone overlayed the original "Water Repellant Gypsum" with another layer in the garage and the wire is trapped between the layers.
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  19. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    Has to be something on the other side, Could the top two holes be screw holes from a surface mount track or fixture?
    What is the wall finish on the other side? It could be running behind another layer of material like sheetrock or siding in the garage.
    If you cut a long-ish (8-12”) straight piece of coathanger wire and put it in your power drill.
    You can spin a pilot hole through the wall next to the white wire and get an exact location in the garage and also a guage of the wall thickness there. Mark each side of the hanger wire at the wall with a sharpie (don’t mark the wall) remove it and you can see the wall thickness
    The hanger wire leaves a tiny fixable hole and does no other damage.

    Edit: 205 d by @SnoDrtRider LOL
  20. Baroquenride

    Baroquenride Everyone dies, but not everyone truly lives.

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    I wonder if another layer of sheetrock was added to the garage side? That makes sense. I'll get the circuit tester from my BIL. I hate these set backs that I have to fix before moving on to the original plan...
    So the original plan was to pull the sheetrock off and put in T-15 instead of the T-7 that was there and along the outside wall.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

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