Carrying/Drying Wood on engine?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Ceri JC, Jan 9, 2013.

  1. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    I was thinking of putting my bashplate toolbox up for sale as now that I no longer use snow chains, I don't really need it. It occurred to me, however, that I might be able to carry small amounts of firewood in this. Not only that, but hopefully, the heat from the engine would dry it out, even if it was wet wood found on the floor.

    I live in Wales and it rains a lot here. Consequently, I not only carry some cotton wool and vaseline fire starters, but also small amounts of kindling with me, as finding anything suitable trail side is a gamble in our weather. The problem is, even with this, it's often possible to burn through all your kindling, before you get up enough heat to dry the wood you've found. I know putting a load of light scrub in the middle of summer in Oz is asking for trouble. I'm talking about putting largish chunks of dead wood you find on the ground, soaked right through, maybe half hour before you stop to make camp.

    So, has anyone done this before and what were the results?

    PS, yes, I know about splitting wood to get to the dry stuff; just wondering about this as an alternative.
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  2. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    you will not dry a chunk of saturated wood in a half hour, sure, the surface will be dry, for the rest of the chunk, think more like a half a year
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  3. kerhonky

    kerhonky Adventure Poser

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    I would tend to think that half an hour would not be sufficient to effect any significant drying. Even kiln drying sawn lumber takes days or even weeks. However, what would it hurt to try it around home when your survival or even just your comfort doesn't depend on getting a fire started quickly? The next time you're just going for a ride, strap on a chunk of wet wood and see how much drying has taken place when you're done with the ride.
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  4. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    Yes, I'll give this a go. From the sounds of it, it won't be spontaneously igniting and torching my bike. :lol3

    RE: Drying wood taking days/weeks; are you talking freshly cut wood being weathered/aged so it'll burn without smoking too much? I know I wouldn't be able to dry wood I cut on the bike. I'm talking more wood than would already be okay to be burnt, had it not been rained on recently.
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  5. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    The "WTF?" thread is in the basement. :1drink
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  6. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

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    I would think that carrying a small hatchet/camp ax in the toolbox/bash plate would be better? Thus, splitting the roadside rained-on wood to get to the dry center part would be optimal. A folding saw and a plastic splitting wedge might be an easy addition to the kit. And lopping off any wet bark would cut down on some of the smoke. Granted, carrying some kindling and accelerant with the hatchet would optimize the chances of getting something started too.
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  7. farmerstu

    farmerstu Been here awhile

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    what the heck is a bashplate toolbox . is this something on a motorcycle? do you use snow chains on a bike?
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  8. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    Can't find it? I checked the "Seen any really stupid/fucked up things lately?" thread...

    I think people have been very gentle in their responses; it was a serious question, but nonetheless, I had expected a far worse jibing:useful responses ratio.
    :lol3

    .

    A smallish toolbox that mounts to the bashplate. They're popular on rally bikes, usually for carrying tools.

    Yes, a bashplate is a formed piece of material, often metal, on the underneath of a bike to prevent damage to the sump (underside of the engine) when bottoming it out when riding offroad over rocks/logs.

    Not any more. I used to trail ride on my own F8 irregularly enough that I had sports touring tyres on a lot of the time. Snow chains worked well with these and the main reason I had the bashplate toolbox was to carry snow chains as:
    A) The weight was low down and centralised, so I didn't notice it at all.
    B) Given the use of chains, it didn't matter if they got messy/wet (the main disadvantage of a bash plate tool box)
    These days, it constantly has knobblies on, which don't work well with snow chains, hence my not carrying chains/needing the toolbox any more.

    I think that's probably the 'sensible' answer to the problem. I like folding saws and have used them in the past. I tend to not carry one on the bike as up until now, I've made do with either the saw blade on my glock shovel, or my Leatherman's. I used to use metal splitting wedges with good success, but not off the bike (as I didn't want the weight penalty). I must admit, I had no idea plastic splitting wedges existed. That sounds like it's worth investigating. Are they strong enough you can get away with using a rock, as opposed to mallet to drive them in? I must admit, I'm a bit paranoid about using hatchets/axes when riding solo/remote; I've seen first hand lots of injuries with them, compared to saws, often not relating to misuse.

    FWIW, intended use of this is going to be for wood in a Kifaru stove (so relatively small in diameter; not massive chunks)
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  9. opmike

    opmike Choosing to be here.

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    If this wood is coming from planet earth, radiant heat from the engine isn't going to do anything to dry it out in anything approaching a reasonable amount of time.

    You'd probably be better off holding chunks of wood above your head in your left hand in air stream while you ride your bike around at top speed... I don't recommend doing this.
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  10. D R

    D R ----

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't wet wood, exposed to heat, tend to generate smoke? Those flashing lights in your mirror might be a fire truck wanting you to pull over.

    :lol3
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  11. DOGSROOT

    DOGSROOT OUTSIDE

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    Hey Ceri JC,

    I've never had this problem, as Ontario isn't as wet as Wales, and has extensive forests.

    I can easily find dead branches of all sizes that are years old, bone dry, still on the tree.

    We are also blessed w/ birch bark, which is plentiful, and an excellent tinder.

    I would suggest looking into fuel pellets.

    (Wood ones, not uranium ones, unless it gets really, really cold.)

    http://www.wdpellet.com/what_are_wood_pellets.php
    .
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  12. OrangeYZ

    OrangeYZ Been here awhile

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    Dry wood exposed to heat generates smoke too!
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  13. rockinrog

    rockinrog Long timer

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    I say try it, or you will never know and always wonder......
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  14. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    wet wood generates steam that mixes with the smoke from the burning dry wood
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  15. bwalsh

    bwalsh Long timer

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  16. kerhonky

    kerhonky Adventure Poser

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    I'm talking about freshly sawn lumber that has been put in a commercial kiln to reduce the moisture content of the wood to the point where it is dimensionally stable. That's usually around 12% to 15%, if I remember correctly from my wood tech classes from 25 years ago. Air dried wood will reach that moisture content on its own, but just not as fast. Logs that get cut into lumber can sit around in the yard for a couple of weeks or more, maybe even a month or two depending on the season, but essentially we are talking about wood that has been recently cut from live trees.
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  17. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    12% is also the moisture content that firewood should be at, maximum

    fwiw, ash only had that moisture content to begin with and will burn green

    Most of my firewood I cut in early spring with snow still on ground, I haul it out in 66" bolts during the summer, as my leisure, a few chunks now, a few more the next time I walk past my woodpile, by fall, the first stuff I cut to stove length & split is ready to burn (beech/birch/maple) because of the way I stack it in my basement next to my furnace with an air duct blowing directly into it, I have effectively built a kiln, anything that wasn't dry, will be shortly
    oak, I let season outside a full year.

    Although I have bungeed a bundle of firewood a few hundred feet from a campground store to my campsite, I wouldn't pack firewood on a trip, there are more practical fuels, liqiuid fuels, sterno, propane
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  18. DADODIRT

    DADODIRT Long timer

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    A little off the subject, but do you plan to cook with the fire, or just for heat/ambiance?

    I tend to forget about the fire if mc camping. Just pack the camp stove.
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  19. peterman

    peterman cop magnet

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  20. bwalsh

    bwalsh Long timer

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    How much would you charge to deliver a cord? :D
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