Carying camera gear - Somewhat more than a point and shoot

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by More_Miles, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. More_Miles

    More_Miles über-n00b

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    Moderators, if this isn't the right forum, please feel free to move it.

    Hey all! I'm looking for some suggestions from the collective wisdom here. I've searched through the various sub-forums and I don't find much about carrying camera gear. Well, not much beyond the Pelican top box or tank bag for the DSLR or the lanyard and pocket method for the point and shoots. Myself, I enjoy shooting somewhat bulkier gear.

    [​IMG]

    Yes, that's a 4x5 press camera, a Minolta TLR, and the various bits of life support gear and consumables. I've got the system pared down to pretty much a bare minimum. As for just the Minolta kit, it a light meter, cable release, tripod, film and a couple filters and we're cooking with gas. It's remarkably small! The whole thing packs down like this.

    [​IMG]

    I don't know HOW many times, either on a day trip or bike expedition that I've bemoaned the lack of my favourite gear! I know that the camera you have with you is better than the one you leave at home, but there are still limitations to cell phone cameras and point shoots.

    So, short of stuffing the whole thing in a dry bag and using a spider web of bungees and rope, how would the collective suggest carrying the gear? I've been thinking about a different camera bag that would fit in one of the panniers, but that would take space away from other equipment for the camping trips.

    As an aside, anyone else use highly archaic gear on your motorcycle trips?

    Thanks all!
    #1
  2. Walterxr650l

    Walterxr650l Long timer

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    Do you use a tank bag? That looks like it would fit nicely in something like this.

    [​IMG]

    Or split it and put it into some tank Panniers. You might split it into pieces and stash them in any nooks and crannies in your luggage.

    There is the pelican case on the rack. I did that on one trip.

    [​IMG]

    Bottom line is that if you want it bad enough, you either make room by giving up something else, or figure out a way to strap it on.

    Walter
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  3. Two Wheeled 'Tard

    Two Wheeled 'Tard Banned

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  4. FotoTEX

    FotoTEX Long timer

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    Really no way to carry that type of gear on a bike. That type of gear is made well but not for that kind of abuse a motorcycle will give it. IMO. And I have carried gear over alot of this planet but not on a bike. Even then it gets banged up.
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  5. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

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    Not the same level gear as yours, but I often carry a Canon 5D DSLR and 2-3 lenses & flash on my big, padded tank bag. They've all survived everything I've thrown at them better than I thought (so far I haven't tried crashing with the camera, though!)

    For me the tank bag is the best place to keep them while riding, as you don't need to always dismount from the saddle to get the photo. And when I go to some sights, or just to have a bite a little walk away from the bike, my tank bag has straps to carry on shoulder or on my back.
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  6. More_Miles

    More_Miles über-n00b

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    Thanks for the responses guys. I'm not against either the tank bag or pelican solution. I was just thinking there might be a better way.

    Depending on the destination, I'd probably leave the TLR at home being more sensitive to alignment issues. The press camera is one of the metal bodied Graflex's. Can't knock it out of adjustment as it's meant to be adjusted! :D It's also survived a couple tumbles so far.

    With crashes, as far as I'm concerned, all bets are off. If I survive and in (mostly) one piece, I'll be happy. As far as speed of access, I don't think I've ever spent less than about 20 min getting set up for a shot with the 4x5. What's an extra couple minutes for access? :lol3
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  7. The Cyclops

    The Cyclops Long timer

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    I carried an old Linholf press 4x5 and Mamiya 645 in a Pelican case mounted on the rear rack with luck. Things do get banged around pretty well, make sure it can rub against anything. I love photography and used to work for a lot of the travel/outdoor magazines and calendars, but I never did like shooting from a bike for some reason. You would think it would be great, but I would get into the grove riding and not want to stop, plus its hard to get out on a bike before daylight and didn't like leaving my bike to backpack in to camp.
    I do mostly commercial photography now, miss the nature and outdoors. As my son gets a little older I hope to start again, and I will be shooting film! I wish I could still get Kodak E-6 chemicals in less than bulk quantities, I have a Jobo ATL 1500 that is sweet! Keep film alive for us, its so much more fun than digital.
    #7