cb350 four or twin, you choose

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by wannabe1, Nov 20, 2010.

  1. Prmurat

    Prmurat Long timer

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    I'll try something different: I always liked the look of the Four but still remember how disapointed I was when the first tests were printed: gutless, bad road manners when pushed etc. So my idea would be to either install a CB400 four in the 350 or "dress" a 400 with the body and mufflers of the 350.... and find another caliper in the front!!
    But what do I know I only have a SL350K1 and CB450K1 too....
    #41
  2. RustyStuff

    RustyStuff Been here awhile

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    I'd rather have the 4.
    #42
  3. cam14

    cam14 Been here awhile

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    Honda made a suprising number of configurations that added up to around 350. The CB and CL 350 twins, 350 Four, SL 350 (twin), SL 350 (single) that later turned into the XL350 (single) and the off-road verson of XR350. And then there was the RC174 which was close to 300 cc six cylinder.

    When I was younger, I had a '70s XL350 and loved it, great bike to ride to school and then play in the dirt after school. Have plans to restore/reso-mod my CL450 (twin).

    For ease of finder parts, the 350 twin is the easy answer. I personally think the 350 four is "cooler" looking but no desire to own one. OTOH, if you want a simple, kick-start bike that can adventure ride, then the XL350 is the clear winner. If it was me, I'd go for the twin.

    Good luck
    #43
  4. ZREXER

    ZREXER n00b

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    Here are pictures of my '75 400 Four. Bought new when I was 16, back in 1976. I have sold many bikes since, but regret selling this one.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Brought it home in the crate, be nice to find one now in the crate!
    #44
  5. jas67

    jas67 Been here awhile

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    Go for a 400 Four over the 350 Four. More power, factory rear sets and lower handlebars on the 75-76 models. IMHO, they look sportier too, though, even though I already owned this, I recently bought a '74 350 Four as well. The 350 and 360 twins are very buzzy at sustain speeds over 50 MPH. If you think you'll be riding for longer over 45-50 MPH, then get a four -- much smoother. Get both if you can. If you find one doesn't get ridden, then sell it. My '75 CB360T doesn't get ridden much since I bought the 400 Four, so it is going up for sale.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #45
  6. gplutt

    gplutt Been here awhile

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    [​IMG]

    Two votes for the four.
    #46
  7. anonny

    anonny What could go wrong?

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    SL 350, I don't need to tell you how many cylinders it has ..... right? :D
    #47
  8. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    You read some of my mind. I have always thought the twins and the fours were heavy, underpowered, and ill handling but I never much liked Honda's for those reasons (except for some Elsinores!). Pre F Honda's are a joke IMO and all the F's had very much of was power (and weight). The first Honda street bike that I ever rode that impressed me (AND I haven't ridden all of them) was a R900RR.
    #48
  9. YamaGeek

    YamaGeek Ancient trailbike padwan

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    The 1969 and earlier CB and Cl 350 twins had a hotter cam profile and different rocker arms.

    So if your purchased bike needs top end work, consider the differences in engines when rebuiding. Having said that, my old '68 CL 350 was freaking awesome for power when I finally got the damn CV carbs tuned. The early 350 twins were conservatively rated at about 33 to 34 h.p. Being as this bike was aimed at pretending to be a scrambler, any real attempts at off road riding should be taken with caution of the rather flexy frame, short suspension travel and top heavy ergos of the bike.
    #49