chain saw idle

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by pelvis_98, Jul 9, 2013.

  1. pelvis_98

    pelvis_98 Havin A Time

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    I have a chain saw that starts and runs fine. But as i use it and it gets hotter the idle increases in speed.

    At first when i use it its fine, i take my finger of the throttle and it drops down in speed, But the more wood i cut the faster it will idle, until the point of when i take my finger off the throttle its almost running wide open.

    I dont think its anything sticking as it happens every time, and if i give the throttle a quick on and off it doesn't make any difference.

    Once it cools down it runs fine again until it gets hot.
    #1
  2. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    sounds like a minor air leak at either the carb mount or a crank seal.....i bet if you pull the plug after it's good and hot there's very little color to it...
    #2
  3. dougfromindy

    dougfromindy I smell premix

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    My saw was running bizarre.
    Turns out the ethanol fuel we know and love has destroyed the fuel pickup hose in gas tank.
    Its something you probably would not think of.
    Joys of crap gasoline.
    Its a pita to replace but check this pickup hose condition.
    Also you can pull muffler/sa and inspect piston for scoring problems.

    ok re-read your note. maybe clean carb/ SA/filter
    my saw just had idle and no power which differs from your scenario.
    #3
  4. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    What kind of saw? I had a couple of them Huskies with the broken fuel pickup, never had any Ethanol in the gas. Same just happened with my friend's Husky, also never drank Ethanol. Old age gets us....!!!:wink:

    I think you need a carb rebuild, my Husky 2100 was doing just the same until I rebuilt it. Easy and cheap as long as you take notes of where the diaphragms go as you dismantle.

    Crank seals maybe but that usually makes them hard to start. Also yes, remove the muffler and look at the piston, much cheaper catching seized rings before they completely destroy the cylinder. Someone sold me a saw like that, effer caused it by breaking the base gasket when he hacked into it. Now I know better and remove the muffler on any two strokes.:wink:
    #4
  5. pelvis_98

    pelvis_98 Havin A Time

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    Its a homelight. (Home depot) Its about 5 years old with very little hours on it, It is only used for cutting off branches and cutting down the odd tree here and there.
    #5
  6. mpatch

    mpatch Long timer

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    Air leak as said before. On tiny 2 cycles even a very small air leak can/will cause idle issues.
    #6
  7. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    Homeylight...put that with the Poulans. Got to wonder when Princess Auto has big piles of either brand at a discount. Boxes usually say "Factory Recon".:wink:

    Yep I have a little Homelite by another name, pretty old and does have "air leaks" at the crank seals. Starts good with starter fluid otherwise I'd burn myself pulling that cord and probably break the starter pulley. Did just that recently....!:cry
    #7
  8. Treedguy

    Treedguy Long timer

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    :deal

    Quality control is shit on those. Seal leaking. Intake maybe.
    #8
  9. pelvis_98

    pelvis_98 Havin A Time

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    Well i didnt want to say the brand name. As i knew what i bought, but i figured for the 1 hour a year i use it id be ok.:deal
    #9
  10. GreaseMonkey

    GreaseMonkey Preshrunk & Cottony

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    What model homelite is it?

    Have you tried adjusting the carburetor at all, preferably by first making certain it is at the stock settings and the previous owner has not fiddled around with them?

    Also, have you inspected and cleaned the air filter? (in extreme cases this alone could cause your problem).

    Anyway, depending on your model saw you only have two or three screws to adjust and if cleaning the air filter doesn't fix it making sure those are adjusted to factory specs will most likely solve your problem. If you cant find the specs yourself post let me know and I can look them up for you.
    #10
  11. RoadGrime

    RoadGrime Been here awhile

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    Does the saw have a 'screw' on the pull-cord side? if so, that might be the adle adjust.
    With the saw running...play around with it a bit.
    #11
  12. pelvis_98

    pelvis_98 Havin A Time

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    Homelite Pro 4618c

    I am the original owner of the saw so nothing has be changed.

    I have not checked anything or tried adjusting anything yet. I was just wondering where to start trouble shooting it. Or if someone knew off the top of their head what would do that
    #12
  13. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    Take some pics and show, I'd like to see what's under the plastics I keep handling them at PA when they go on sale real cheap but so far have resisted. If anything like the two Homelite backpack leaf blowers someone gave me, not much is adjustable/serviceable in there.

    But for the crank/conrod/piston and cylinder everything was injection molded plastics held together with weird tapping screws. Both had broken conrods and very few hours, still looked like new. Brought to me all the way from Calgary then brought all the way to the coast so I could toss them in the dumpster at work.

    My older Homelite saw by another name can be adjusted, does have Hi/Lo carb adjustments but easy to figure it has leaks because I can't adjust them properly. Easy task adjusting saws when they aren't leaking somewhere, otherwise will drive you crazy.:eek1
    #13
  14. pelvis_98

    pelvis_98 Havin A Time

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    [​IMG]


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    #14
  15. GreaseMonkey

    GreaseMonkey Preshrunk & Cottony

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    Nice pics. For starters, here's a your tube video on adjusting the carb on your particular saw:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMZlq6Z1lgA

    Easier for me to cut and paste instead of typing!

    Anyway, IMHO how you should adjust your own saw is to make a couple cuts so the idle starts racing, then turn the idle down to where the chain does not move under idle. Now adjust the "L" (low speed) screw which is the one on top towards the front of the saw. Turn it in until the saw starts running poorly, then turn it out until it starts running poorly again, then slowly turn it back in, and about halfway between the two extremes it should run pretty good. If it starts idling too slow adjust the idle stop screw (the one on the bottom) again. When the saw is idling nicely squeeze the trigger and adjust the H screw. You want this setting to be slightly rich, so when the saw is wailing away turn this screw in slightly until you get a hint of a "burble" in the sound.

    You may have to tweak the screws in order 3 or 4 times, as each screw affects the others.

    ONe last thing, is the saw in the video has phillips head screws and yours looks like it has the Homelite "double D" type of screw head, in which case you are supposed to to use a special tool:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B009LA6MAM/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&condition=new

    The shop I worked at sold Stihls, so when I got my first of these things I made a tool from some copper tubing so if you are handy you can figure something out too.


    Hope that helps

    GM
    #15
  16. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    That's what I was thinking. Runs fine cold, then as stuff heats up and expands the leak opens up.

    OP, IMO anything other than Husqvarna, Stihl, and Jonseered aren't worth the box they come in if you depend on them. As a second limbing saw anything will work as long as there's a good one in the truck with you to back it up. I sometimes long for a small cheapo, the big ones get heavy after a while.

    I don't know a lot about the lower grade models, but as far as the big boys my Huskys have held up exceptionally well. My 372 did logger duties for a year before I gave it an easy firewood life, it helped cut 3 truck loads (logging truck, not pickup) a day, along with a 390. On it's second piston and maybe fourth or fifth ring, but otherwise pretty much original.
    #16
  17. groundrules

    groundrules Long timer

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    It seems like Husqies have been showing up in the big box stores (lowes). are these cut from the same cloth? worth owning?
    #17
  18. mpatch

    mpatch Long timer

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    The "good" huskys start with a 3 then the next 2 or 3 digits are the displacement then they end in XP
    #18
  19. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    For a long lasting - never buy another one type homeowner saw I like the 346xp. Lightweight, excellent power. The smaller huskies are good too, just not the same.

    IIRC, the 'XP' versions have magnesium cases and the others are hard plastic, similar to your saw now. They are good saws, dont get me wrong, just not designed for hard daily use. My cousin has a 350, which is a homeowner saw, that has heated his house for the last 6 or 8 years reliably.

    I also have a 55 rancher, which they used to call a 'farm grade' that has roughly 75 cords of wood through it. Changed top end once, but it could have gone longer. I had a guy port and polish the cylinder and wanted to freshen it up while I had it apart.

    Also, dont get on arboristsite.com and find a guy to port and polish a cylinder for you. Its a terrible idea. I've made that mistake on every 2 stroke I own. Weedwacker is next on the chopping block as soon as the warranty is up. :lol3

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
    #19
  20. pelvis_98

    pelvis_98 Havin A Time

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    If the day comes that i make my living with a chain saw I will be buying the top of the line one.

    As for now, the 1 hour a year i use a chain saw the Home Depot one is fine.

    Thanks for the video on adjusting the idle I have not been home for a bit and wil try it out.
    #20