Chang Jiang BMW R71 Replica

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by Cordless, Feb 1, 2011.

  1. Cordless

    Cordless Two Wheel Addict

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2006
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    2,051
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    Tom,

    This seems to be the general message. Still, he is getting some fair bids for his ersatz BMW on eBay so someone thinks there's value there.

    I think I might give around $1500 just to hang the thing on the wall of my shop for decoration.
    #21
  2. gspell68

    gspell68 Long timer

    Joined:
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    Uhhh?
    There's total interchangeability between all the major assemblies of a Ural, Dnepr, and CJ-750 and even the BMW R-71 if you wanna throw it in the mix!
    The engine mounts are all the same. They all mount up to the various gearboxs the same. You may have to lengthen/shorten driveshafts depending on gearbox types. The guts of the final drives are the same and are interchangeable; the whole FD's are interchangeable as long as you maintain integrity between plunger and swingarm frames, respectively. You can swap wheels, sidecars, forks, etc. with no real problems, too.

    Additionally, they aren't really knock-offs. The Russian Ural M-72's would've been considered licensed BMW's except for that whole pesky WW2 thing. The Ural factory tooling was passed on to the Chinese in the late 1950's and reportedly still being used into the 1990's.

    The Dneprs, which were made in the Ukraine, were anytrhing but copies. They used a high pressure oil system and roller bearings, unlike BMW. The K-750 was designed in 1951 with rear swingarm suspension, five years before BMW used a rear swingarm. When Dnepr made a 2WD, it was a swingarm as well, unlike BMW who could only engineer theirs onto a hardtail. The sidecars were swingarm sprung as well, unlike BMW who used leaf springs or no suspension at all on their sidecars. And Dnepr gearboxes are auto-declutching (no BMW's ever had), meaning you don't really have to use the hand clutch lever except to put it into reverse, which only about 9000 special built BMW's ever had reverse.

    Calling the Soviet bikes "knock-off's" just because of the engine layout is like calling every car an Oldsmobile knock off because they were the first to use overhead valves...
    #22
  3. gspell68

    gspell68 Long timer

    Joined:
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    Now, as to the the original questions...
    They're rare but fairly common! They can be found easily in China. New Old Stock (NOS) military grade rigs from the Peoples Liberation Army (PLA) with fewer than 50 kilometers could be had a couple years ago for $1000 to $1500......in China! Getting them to the USA would add another $1000+.
    All totaled between Ural, Dnepr, and CJ-750's, there were more than 3,000,000 (three million) of these type rigs made.

    In addition to what's above, the Germans gave/sold/traded the already outdated BMW R-71 designs and most likely some tooling to the Rooskies. The R-71 was the last 2-cylinder sidevalve bike BMW ever made and had a production run of about 3,800 units (none of which were ever used by the German Army except oneseys-n-tooseys in the same way the US Army uses Ford vans, which doesn't make them a "military vehicle").
    The first "Russian made BMW R-71" rolled off the lines of several factories in Moskow. Some say the data plates even said BMW R-72 on the first ones. Anyhow, the plant(s) were moved to Irbit in the Urals. Total wartime production was fewer than 10,000 units.
    In the late 1950's, that tooling was given to the communist Chinese and the Russians started making an improved M-72M that eventually got an OHV engine, then later a rear swingarm suspension, until it evolved into today's Ural.
    The CJ-750 has gone through a few upgrades. First an external distributor lump on the left side of the flathead engine and a 12 volt system. Then a 32HP 750 OHV.
    #23