Changing sprockets on Tiger 800XC

Discussion in 'British Beasts: Triumph Tigers' started by Xcountry-Rider, Nov 4, 2012.

  1. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    I'll reach 30K on my Tiger in November. I'd like to change out the sprockets on the bike myself. I'm not the mechanic type but have done some stuff on the bike like installing fog lights and heated grips. The problem is i really don't know how. I could figure it out but first i want to reach out to the Tiger 800 community for help. I want to drop a tooth of the front sprocket and go down to 15 to get more low end grunt and probably keep the same number of teeth on the back.

    Can any of you share insights on the right sprockets to get and how to install. The back looks kind of obvious but the front not so much. Do i need to change the chain at the same time and which chain should i get and who from? Photos would be helpful and any other tips i could use. I'm sure i'm not the only one so whatever you can share could help hundreds of people.
    #1
  2. motosickle2000

    motosickle2000 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    187
    If you have 30K, you should definitely change both sprockets and the chain. I recommend a DID 525VM2. It is very high quality and not too expensive. It is also an Xring.

    You will need a large socket to loosen the nut on the front sprocket. I can't remember the size. Loosen the front sprocket before removing the chain, an air impact wrench makes it a cinch to remove. The rear is self explanatory.

    You will need a chain breaker and rivetting tool. Motion Pro makes a good one. I bought one made by RK.




    #2
  3. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    This one here? What size do I need?
    #3
  4. Riot

    Riot Tiger Rider

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    105
    Location:
    Brisvagas, Oztralia
    Its a 36mm nut and the std chain is 122 links for the XC and 120 links for the roadie.

    There is a lockwasher crimped on to it.

    I just changed the front sprocket -1T to a 15 tooth.

    What I did..

    remove 8mm bolt holding gear shifter.
    remove 2 x 8mm bolts holding sprocket cover on.

    Un-crimp the lockwasher carefully.

    slide on the shift linkage temporarily*

    put in neutral and get someone to operate the rear brake

    I used a rattlegun to remove the sprocket nut - its on tight with threadlocker.

    removed lockwasher

    take off shifter linkage again

    slipped the chain and sprocket off the spline without adjusting the chain tensioners - there is about 35mm of slack and you can rotate the sprocket as you remove to gain some slack - sounds odd but when your in there you will see what needs to happen.

    put on new sprocket - tip fit chain to sprocket to chain THEN slip both on spline again get some clearance by rotating the sprocket same as when removing.

    put on lock washer BUT don't crimp it there yet.

    threadlock sprocket nut, install to 85Nm (93ft/lb) torque and crimp lock washer again.

    adjusted chain tension to 35mm slack.

    lubed chain

    replaced sprocket cover used threadlocker on bolts.

    replaced gear linkage bolt - use threadlocker here too.

    Took for blat and enjoyed the extra pickup and low speed rideability.
    #4
  5. Rob Dirt

    Rob Dirt More or less in line

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,567
    Location:
    Mobile
    Just be sure you have the bike in neutral & use the back brake to loosen the front sprocket nut (36mm). If you try to loosen it with the bike in gear, then it will put strain on the transmission. With the bike in neutral, torq it back on while holding the back brake.
    On the rear sprocket, make sure you buy a new bolt kit. To remove the old bolts always turn the nut, NOT the bolts. Always use loctite & a torq wrench.
    Your new chain will have a master link. Make sure it faces forward. Like a fish swimming up stream. If you've never put on a master link, then you may want help from somebody with experience. If you put it on wrong, then it will come off.
    #5
  6. cug

    cug --

    Joined:
    May 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    5,087
    Location:
    Sunny California
    Last time I changed a chain was on my Honda TransAlp in 97 or so. It shouldn't be too hard to just take the swingarm out and leave the chain closed, right? That's what I did last time.
    #6
  7. Rob Dirt

    Rob Dirt More or less in line

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,567
    Location:
    Mobile
    New chains come separated. You have to use a master link or a press on fitting. It's not rocket science, but you can screw it up. It's extremely difficult to squeeze the links together enough to get the master link to snap on. Some people grind a tiny bit off the thickness to aid in getting it on right. I do not recommend doing that. After you get the master link snapped on, it's a good idea to spread the links back out. The ones you were squeezing to get the master link on.
    You may be able to buy a solid chain with the correct links, but I don't know anything about that. Every chain I've bought was too long & I had to remove the correct number of links & install a master link.
    #7
  8. fullmonte

    fullmonte Reformed Kneedragger

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,434
    Location:
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    #8
  9. cug

    cug --

    Joined:
    May 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    5,087
    Location:
    Sunny California
    Interesting. That was different during the time when I kept bikes long enough that I had to change the chain ... :lol3
    #9
  10. DSM8

    DSM8 Where fun goes to die....

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,090
    Location:
    Glendora, Ca
    Apply heat to the sprocket bolt, this will release the threadlock. If you have a heat gun that will work otherwise a propane torch will do it too.

    We are not talking about getting it red hot, just warm that will make it easier to remove the sprocket if there is threadlock on it.
    #10
  11. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    I found that but for some reason it won't let you select 50 for the rear sprocket.
    #11
  12. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    Ok just ordered the set. I had to call them because they only offered 46 through 49 teeth of the rear sprocket via the web site. They got me a 50 for the rear but it bumped up the price to 195 vs 190 quoted on the site. That was because it was a better quality sprocket than what comes in the kit according to the guy on the phone. I'm hoping that i can get some help with putting them on from the local San Diego SDAR crew.
    #12
  13. Flyboy52219

    Flyboy52219 Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2012
    Oddometer:
    86
    Location:
    Metro Detroit, Michigan
    Hi All -

    Dumb question in relation to this thread...sprocket cover removal. I wanted to do a thorough chain cleaning and was not able to remove the gear change rod to allow the sprocket cover to come off. Usually the clevis ends just pop off, but they seemed really snug and i didnt want to force it in case thats not the proper way to remove. Can anyone confirm if they just pry off or is there a special tool needed. Thanks in advance!
    #13
  14. Riot

    Riot Tiger Rider

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    105
    Location:
    Brisvagas, Oztralia
    I just unbolted the top of the rod from the spline - bolt needs to come out not just loose.

    See post # 4 from me.
    #14
  15. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    Can you point me to the right socket i need to add to my tool kit?
    #15
  16. Riot

    Riot Tiger Rider

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    105
    Location:
    Brisvagas, Oztralia
    Mine is a 3/4 drive with a 1/2 --> 3/4 adaptor inserted.
    I got mine from a garage/yard sale years ago.
    It is a Kinchrome brand.

    Pretty much identical to this
    #16
  17. Xcountry-Rider

    Xcountry-Rider Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    912
    Location:
    Pine Valley, California (San Diego County)
    So this should work then?
    #17
  18. Riot

    Riot Tiger Rider

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    105
    Location:
    Brisvagas, Oztralia
    #18
  19. bsupak

    bsupak n00b

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2012
    Oddometer:
    5
    Hey,

    I was changing my front sprocket with xcountryrider and afry this weekend and he suggested I post up here (he still loves you guys :)) .

    So I downsized to a 15t on the front and it rides like a whole new bike. The throttle is more sensitive and I can fully unload (and lift a bit) the front-end on throttle only. I do have to shift a bit more, but it feels more like other bikes I've had.
    One bit of advice, in looking for the part (15t front sprocket for a 525 chain) I found it's the same part as for the GSXR 600/750/1000, SV650/1000, Triumph 675, DL650/1000, & ZX10R. Cyclegear had one on the shelf.

    I see what the converts mean when they say this is the gearing Triumph should have installed :)

    Bryan
    #19
  20. some call me...tim

    some call me...tim Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Oddometer:
    282
    Location:
    Seattle
    Have you noticed any significant impact on MPG?
    #20