Coast to Coast (and back?) with an Italian Supermodel

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by AntiHero, Jul 13, 2012.

  1. rico2072

    rico2072 Been here awhile

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    Dam Nitro! You better have some empanadas for me when I go up there!!!! LOL
  2. CaliforniaKid

    CaliforniaKid n00b

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    Simple; if you do basically the same thing (riding around the country looking for experiences that differ from your norm) then it de facto becomes the new norm. I totally understand what you mean about the nervous energy "required" to propel you on your way, so not sure if the rest of this episode (however long that may be) will feel as impromptu. Doesn't mean it can't be enjoyed though as you point out on the Duc...

    Whatever you decide, do it without regrets...
  3. Sgt93

    Sgt93 Adventurer

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    I learned a while ago, if you are typing anything long for a forum post, do it in word and paste it into the forum. Cheap insurance
  4. Rinty

    Rinty Been here awhile

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    Ah, Sno-Seal; popular with the hiking crowd.
  5. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

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    Hmmm....it could be that a lot of America is the same all over...a sort of homogenization seems to have taken place...but perhaps you're discovering something more. That is, even the independent places strongly resemble each other, like there's a sort of fractalness to it: "all funky coffee houses resemble each other" and that all old-fashioned diners look very similar. Maybe, say, in the case of a coffeehouse, people who start coffeehouses do so because they really liked one they went to, and so the one they create contains the same elements as the one they liked, and if that holds true for most people who start independent coffeehouses then maybe a population of "funky coffeehouse owners" develops that shares a certain eclectic style--eventually developing into some "norms" for such coffeehouses. When someone visits for the first time a coffeehouse in a new city they probably compare it to their favorite "back home" and it gets higher marks the more it resembles that favorite. And this tends to reinforce the "type." When I ran a used bookstore for a couple of years I was careful not to stock books that were mildewed or moldy but then people would come in my store for the first time and complain that it didn't have "that old bookstore smell I love." My explaining that the smell they loved was due to dust and mildew and that I was trying to run a clean, well-lighted place, did not seem to satisfy them. Based on their past experiences they had a model in their heads of what a used bookstore had to be, an expectation, and I had failed to meet it. I could tell they felt my store did not measure up.
    Then too, all restaurants resemble each other, really, because they all generally have tables, chairs, etc. Maybe if one sees enough places differences tend to be obscured by our perception of the common elements. If I'm sitting at a table on the dock at Nantucket eating oysters how different is it from sitting on a dock eating oysters at a little place on the Rhode Island shore? In both places I'm sitting next to the ocean, on a wooden dock, at a table, in a chair. The oysters may even have come from the same beds....it's possible. The places are very similar but the building I'm sitting in in each case is distinguishable, the waitresses are different, the details of the view are different--in Nantucket I look onto a harbor scene with yachts and ferries coming and going. At Rhode Island the view is smaller, a cove, with private homes and small personal docks. So, very much the same, but different in detail. Maybe being on a long journey such as this one, the experiences begin to bleed into each other, to blur somewhat, and the details get filtered out in the process because the common features are sensorily reinforced and fill the memory. Or it may be that humans become overloaded with novelty after a period of time of unceasing change and so we mentally grab hold of the common, familiar elements....to sort of ground ourselves. But if this were the case one might expect it to be a comfort and it doesn't seem to be that to you, so I'm going with the other idea...that subconscious awareness to the common elements tends to crowd out the details, in time. Don't know if this is balderdash or not....but if not for your insightful RR, Anti-hero, I wouldn't have paused to ponder.... so thanks again for making me think!!
  6. AntiHero

    AntiHero Long timer

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    Agree with ya, Blader and CA Kid. There's always going to be similarities on a grand scale (Golden Gate Bridge is just a bridge, after all), but it's my reaction to the subtle differences--the subtle differences that once made places seem very different. Perhaps I'm just tired, perhaps I've just seen so many 'new' details that the law of diminishing returns takes over. But it is an interesting phenomenon.

    I made quick work of the Carolinas and am now in Savannah. Stayed a night (two?) in Charleston, hence not much to write about, before arriving here in GA.

    Did get a few good shots along the way, though....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is just a taste of what's to come. There are some mighty big oaks dwarfing the Panigale in my pics of Savannah.

    One final thing to close out Charleston--to the guy in the truck next to me at the light who said he'd been following this ride report--come clean and introduce yourself! Was very cool to run into someone on the road who knew who I was and had been following along. :)
  7. AntiHero

    AntiHero Long timer

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    So there's a reason why they call Savannah Savannah:

    [​IMG]

    It's the kind of landscape you'd expect to see elephants, lions and wildebeests roaming in.

    But once you get to the city itself, things change. There are a lot of identifying characteristics--essential, defining characteristics--that cities have. But I can only think of one city other than Savannah in which a tree plays an integral role: LA. Palm trees are to Los Angeles as Oak Trees are to Savannah. It wouldn't be that far of a stretch to consider the trees in both cities as representative of the personalities of the population. In LA each palm tree stands alone....individual, powerful, but in the end, not unique at all. In Savannah, the oaks intermingle with each other. It's as if there's a network of branches forming a connective canopy. You can see that network--a true social network where even strangers are treated like good friends--whenever people are around. And there's also a laziness to the trees that seem to evoke feelings of relaxation and contentment.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    (Me playing with tilt-shifting:)
    [​IMG]
  8. bob393

    bob393 Been here awhile

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    Simply the best, Use it all the time on my work, riding, hiking boots. Just plain works!

    HINT: After you rub it on all over the boot hold the boot over the kitchen stove flame for a few seconds
    and it melts and soaks right in. No don't try to charbroil the boot just heat it up, and gas works best.
  9. rico2072

    rico2072 Been here awhile

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    Tilt-shifting?
    what kind of camera and how do you do it?
    Great pics!
  10. CaliforniaKid

    CaliforniaKid n00b

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    That first photo is striking. Very nice.
  11. AntiHero

    AntiHero Long timer

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    I can't do true tilt-shifting with my camera....and my experiment above was more of just a blurring of the background than real tilt-shifting (where the lens isn't parallel to the 'film'). It can be done with great effect in photoshop, but certain compositions lend themselves to tilt-shifting better than others (shot from a distance overhead, with lots of objects).

    THIS is true tilt-shifting:

    [​IMG]

    When applied to a van Gogh the effects can be truly mezmerizing:

    [​IMG]
  12. wayne13

    wayne13 Lets Ride!!

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    AHero, Are you going to head on down to Key West? The road down A1A is something that I think you would really appreciate. Plus the drive down the Keys is something that is unique and you really cant go back west without seeing the southern most point of the US. Plus To see what Charles Flagler accomplished when he built the road down to key west is amazing.
  13. musicman

    musicman Been here awhile

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    ...but do some research to find out which days the traffic is lightest. It can be a frustrating, while scenic highway.
  14. wayne13

    wayne13 Lets Ride!!

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    ^^ He is right. Sorry forgot about some of the constrcution on there. Avoid rush hour times.

    At least get from Miami to Key West Section of A1A in. It is amazing section of road even if it basically straight.
  15. AntiHero

    AntiHero Long timer

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    No Key West for me, guys. Though the tropical scenery sounds tremendous, I'm heading to Macon, GA tomorrow, then onto Birmingham to Barber Fri night/Sat. morning, then down to Mobile, where I'm meeting up to ride with my dad to New Orleans. Traveling at night on Thurs. and Friday--not much chance for me to enjoy much along the way. Definitely looking forward to Debris Beef and Sazeracs at K-Pauls, though!
  16. wayne13

    wayne13 Lets Ride!!

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    When you get into the Macon area and start towards B'ham, I need to take you on some of the back roads through there. i grew up there and know a bunch of ways to get there. And they are not really out of the way, just nice back roads that Duc was made for.
  17. s1000rr

    s1000rr Adventurer

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    Anti

    Have you heard any word from the Doctor in New York. I was wondering how your Long Island (digs) boat had faired as well has his properties.
  18. LWRider

    LWRider Been here awhile

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    AL 25 (Dunnavant Road) comes to mind, just east of Barber Motorsports Park.:wink:
  19. AntiHero

    AntiHero Long timer

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    Hoping I'll be doing some of the miles during daylight. Right now it's looking like Savannah to Macon and Macon to Birmingham rides will begin around dusk.

    The Doc is ok. The boat mostly made it through ok--if you remember those pics he said the water level was at the top of those wooden poles. (!). He just got power back and hot water back on this morning. Very rough times indeed. He and I had a lot of interesting discussions over text about survival-type situations. Amazing how quickly our lives can be completely and totally disrupted with no power.
  20. s1000rr

    s1000rr Adventurer

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    Anti.

    Great to hear that about the Doc. I know that they are having a very tough time of it. You are quite correct we forget about how fragile our living environment is until parts of it get cut off. I'm glad that you got to experience Long Island prior to the mess. I'm sure that locals are all worried about just getting past the tough times.