Continental TRAIL ATTACK tyres/tires ongoing test

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Chris_GS, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. two trackin fool

    two trackin fool Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,950
    Location:
    Mobile with any Luck if not Michigan
    Are you still riding ? Everything good ?
    How is your milage now ?
  2. Two Plugs

    Two Plugs Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,640
    Location:
    Groningen Province - Top of Holland
    Still riding, still going strong. End of July we will do the French Connection tour - will be good for another 3.000 km in 7 days.
  3. Tsotsie

    Tsotsie Semi-reformed Tsotsi

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,435
    Location:
    South Texas
    A- for Conti - their prices have increased significantly latetly!
  4. Two Plugs

    Two Plugs Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,640
    Location:
    Groningen Province - Top of Holland
    Unfortunately we had to chance our 'French Connection' travel plans (will be done, but due to family circumstances by car... :puke1 )

    So the extra milleage will have to wait...
  5. IbuprofenDude

    IbuprofenDude Head Peon

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    97
    Location:
    Zachary, LA
    Decided to replace the TC1's after 9000 miles due to an upcoming trip, but they could have gone >10K without a problem. Agree with general consensus that they are awesome on the road, and better than expected off. I did go on a few miles of very sandy road, and thought I might die. But that speaks more to my lack of confidence than anything. Didn't dump it, but the front might as well have been a ski.:puke1

    Just got theTA2's, and they feel about the same. Will say that the marketing as not having the slick-as-snot grip when new is true. They have a texture that seems grippy. Won't matter much longer, but nice feature!

    Summary: Highly recommend unless you find yourself in mud and sand a lot.
  6. mrazekan

    mrazekan Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,358
    Location:
    DT Vancouver. The other one...
    I know but look what I found:

    $277 Shipped!!! From Competition Accessories in SC. 110/80-19 & 150/70-17 only. But if you buy them separate, it is still a better package price than anything else I was able to find.

    I've ridden my tiger with these tires up and throughout the Gifford Pinchot. Hells Alien, on a 950, and I were the only people not on TKC style tires. There was a GSA ahead of me who got stuck in a steep and rocky jeep track. I pulled up next to him and stopped to make sure he was fine. On the grapefruit sized rocks, on an incline, the tires had enough grip that I was able to start back up and finish the climb. Though we knew how good these tires are, Hells and I were still impressed! Especially since we were able to rail the mountain roads once we got back to pavement.

    I would have to agree that these tires suck on snow:
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/66891276@N00/3243122608/" title="1st attempt by mrazekan, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3406/3243122608_c1120eaab4_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="1st attempt"></a>​

    But they are not as bad as people say they are on wet dirt and sand:
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/66891276@N00/3243131004/" title="Can't think of a better title by mrazekan, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3268/3243131004_c6b3563063_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="Can't think of a better title"></a>
    One of these three is not like the other :D

    They are amazing tires, but they can't survive this:
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/66891276@N00/3641228411/" title="It's got a nail in it by mrazekan, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2473/3641228411_fba86e1f4a_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="It's got a nail in it"></a>​

    I can't wait to get the TA2's on.
  7. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    southern England
    they can with ultraseal in
  8. Two Plugs

    Two Plugs Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,640
    Location:
    Groningen Province - Top of Holland
    8.000 km (5.000 miles) done so far on the TA II and still no significant signes of wear. Upcomming weekend going to play in the German Tuetenburger Forrest area, good for another 750km

    Peggscraping material, those Conti TA II's! :clap
  9. HelmetHead Cycle

    HelmetHead Cycle Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Oddometer:
    312
    Location:
    NE Georgia
    I was looking at my TA2's and realized the tread design was opposite on the front and the rear. I had to double check the arrows to be sure they were mounted correctly, but indeed they were. This seems odd to me. Can anyone tell me the reason behind this?
  10. TwilightZone

    TwilightZone Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    5,167
    Location:
    Behind the Redwood Curtain
    "...was opposite on the front and the rear..."

    Rear provides traction going forward.
    Front provides traction going rearward.
  11. HelmetHead Cycle

    HelmetHead Cycle Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Oddometer:
    312
    Location:
    NE Georgia
    Could someone else check their's to see if their's are different as well? I have sent an email to Continental for reason but no reply yet.
  12. 2 SPOT

    2 SPOT bring the rape whistle

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,163
    Location:
    Payson AZ
    Perfectly normal for directional tires to mount opposite like that. You'd be hard pressed to find any that dont.
  13. PFFOG

    PFFOG Richard Alps-aholic

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,303
    Location:
    Western NY, further from NYC than 6 entire states
    Don't buy that as tread has little to do with traction, on the street, dirt yes, pavement no. On the street it has very little to do with water evacuation either, for a Motorcycle.

    And the trend started 5 years ago or so. My guess is some engineer at brand X drew it backwards in his CAD program, and no one caught it until it was too late. The other manufactures then saw that the tire was getting a lot of free press, with moto journalists that were perplexed, and at the local hang out everybody was laughing at the dolt that put it on backwards, until he bet them not. Upon showing his buddies it was correctly installed, a there was a crowd looking at this brand X tire (more free Advertising). So like any good marketing department they wanted to cash into to all the buzz, so they followed suit. Maybe a stretch, but as plausible as any other theory.
  14. HelmetHead Cycle

    HelmetHead Cycle Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Oddometer:
    312
    Location:
    NE Georgia
  15. 2 SPOT

    2 SPOT bring the rape whistle

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,163
    Location:
    Payson AZ
    if ya feel like reading, heres a bit from AVON

    Before we can talk about directional arrows you must first understand a bit about tread patterns. There are many different tread patterns but there is one main reason to have any tread and that is to disperse water. (dust, dirt)
    A tread pattern can be designed to disperse more water by making it rotate in only one direction. Thus, the need for directional arrows. The arrow tells you which way to mount a tire for maximum water dispersal. Another, less apparent reason for directional arrows is the tread splice.
    What is a tread splice? When a tire is manufactured the tread portion of the tire starts out as a long flat strip. This strip is wrapped around the tire and the two ends are cut on an angle so one end overlaps the other rather than having square cut ends.
    This overlapping point or splice offers a bigger surface area to bond together, rather than the small surface area provided by square cut ends. (Imagine gluing your fingertips together, as opposed to gluing along the entire length of your fingers laid on top of each other. Like an angled splice, the overlapping fingers result in a much stronger bond).
    To further ensure the strength of this bond along the tread splice the directional arrow will show you which way to mount the tire so that when the rider is “on the gas”; the acceleration force on the rear tire is pressing the splice together, rather than peeling it back.
    As for braking, 80 % of the braking should take place in the front on most bikes. Therefore, the front tread splice is run in the opposite direction than that of the rear, so when the rider is on the brakes, he’s not peeling the tread splice back.
    If you are using a tire that has a directional arrow for rear rotation only and for some reason you want to put it on the front, make sure it is rotating in the opposite direction so you don’t aggravate the tread splice. Avon Tyres.
  16. 2 SPOT

    2 SPOT bring the rape whistle

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,163
    Location:
    Payson AZ
    and just in case you dont believe a 3rd party and tire manufacturer, here is a comment right from conitnental's website, and after reading the above it might make more sense than just some dolt cad designer mixing up his arrows:lol3.

    Where a tyre has directional arrows moulded upon it, the tyre must be fitted so that the relevant front or rear arrow follows the direction of rotation. Road handling and tyre wear may worsen, or damage to the tyre can occur in extreme circumstances if these instructions are not followed.
  17. PFFOG

    PFFOG Richard Alps-aholic

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,303
    Location:
    Western NY, further from NYC than 6 entire states

    Tire splice was what I always was told, there use to be "universal" tires, arrow one way for front, other way for rear, as the majority of the forces are opposite (braking vs acceleration)
  18. HelmetHead Cycle

    HelmetHead Cycle Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Oddometer:
    312
    Location:
    NE Georgia
    Continental motorcycle tires should always be mounted in accordance with
    the directional arrow that is printed on the sidewall of the tire. Our
    entire line of Attack tires (i.e. Trail Attack 2, Sport Attack 2, Road
    Attack 2 EVO, Race Attack Comp., Classic Attack, etc...) have the front
    tread rotating in reverse of the rear tread. Reversing the direction of
    the tread design allows for better overall performance and enhanced tread
    wear.

    Please let me know if you have any further questions.
    Best Regards,
    Greg Reich
    Continental Tire the Americas, LLC
    Sales & Marketing Manager/Motorcycle Tires
    7800 Liberty Church Rd.
    Johnstown, Ohio 43031


    Greg,

    I appreciate your following up with me. However, I am totally confused now. I understand completely about tire or tread splicing or the overlapping of the inner strips to form the tire. And I know and realize the importance of having the tire rotating in one direction because of the splicing. But why have the tread running backwards on the front? This will not shed water on wet pavement. On the contrary, it will only force water to run to the center and pool, thus causing a possibility for hydroplaning. I found the following excerpt from an Avon Tyre publication;

    A tread pattern can be designed to disperse more water by making it rotate in only one direction. Thus, the need for directional arrows. The arrow tells you which way to mount a tire for maximum water dispersal. Another, less apparent reason for directional arrows is the tread splice. There are many different tread patterns but there is one main reason to have any tread and that is to disperse water.

    Please clear this up for me. I look forward to your explanation.
  19. PFFOG

    PFFOG Richard Alps-aholic

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,303
    Location:
    Western NY, further from NYC than 6 entire states

    Actually the tread on a mc tire does very little to dissipate water from under the tire.

    A car tire has a contact patch profile that is essentially a rectangle where a mc tire looks more almond/egg shape. Think military landing craft vs canoe.

    The profile is what does the shedding or actually parting of the water on a MC tire. Plus the PSI on the contact patch, on the average MC with rider is about 2 times that of the average car, thus resisting hydroplaning even more.
  20. HelmetHead Cycle

    HelmetHead Cycle Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Oddometer:
    312
    Location:
    NE Georgia


    Finally we have an answer that makes a little sense, somewhat.....but why not just keep the tread patterns the same, front and rear? Perhaps higher production cost??