controversial motorcycle shop hours in the US

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by anorphirith, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Long timer

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    To quote the great Tosh.0, "Money can't buy happiness? The hell it can't! It can buy a wave runner. You ever see a sad guy on a wave runner?"
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  2. TheProphet

    TheProphet Retired; Living the Dream

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    :confused

    These people are likely sad....

    http://www.lakegastongazette-observer.com/news/article_d9c31882-4944-5fbe-a87e-8e7ccb5e55d2.html

    Point being: There is never a guarantee, or a fail safe purchase of "happiness". Material things can go both ways easily.

    In the case of the OP's question. In the end, HE might become happy that the shop is open over the weekend, but what of the happiness of the shop owner? Will HE be happier as a result... or not?

    Shouldn't this be a win/win?
  3. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Long timer

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  4. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Been here awhile

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    What's contrioverial about taking time off to have a good time? Here in SIlicon Valley, where most people seem to have sacrificed their lives, loves, families, and souls in search of some mythical prosperity that will alwyas remain just out of reach, it always cheers me up to pass a moto shop that's closed on Sunday and think that the owners are out somewhere riding, having a ball. Ride on, guys! It makes the world a better place! I can always get my parts on Saturday :)
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  5. TheProphet

    TheProphet Retired; Living the Dream

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    That all you can come up with? Come on - you're not even tryin'.:lol3
  6. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    I have $1 in cash money, please buy me a wave runner
  7. PlainClothesHippy

    PlainClothesHippy Riding an ugly bike.

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    Once. I was fishing an inlet in NJ and there were two waverunners ripping around when one of them ceased to run. I stood on shore and watched as three idiots tried to tow the thing with the other. They tied a line to the steering yoke at the highest point on the disabled runner and proceeded to try to tow it. They couldn't seem to understand why the thing kept going sideways and tipping over, and they tried over and over. Finally a passing waverunner stopped and did the job correctly for them. The score that day was three unhappy idiots, one slightly amused competent rider, and a handful of fully amused fishermen who got to watch the show.

    They should have paid attention in Physics class.
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  8. TheProphet

    TheProphet Retired; Living the Dream

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    Conclusion: Waverunner = No guarantee of happiness. :(

    Bet the guy who helped them out was happy afterwards. That says something.

    Material things to gain happiness 0, acts of kindness 1.
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  9. aldend123

    aldend123 Long timer

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    Money still buys happiness - he just needed a back-up waverunner.

    The problem is with the premise that it's either/or. Some money definitely buys happiness. The debate is really whether lots of money buys happiness. I don't need lots of things to be happy, but I know I need a few basics.
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  10. Steve in Golden

    Steve in Golden Been here awhile

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    I don't need (or want) lots of things to be happy either. Too much stuff decreases happiness. I want more time to do fun things, and much less time at the office. Which requires more money, lots of money in fact. A couple million ought to do it.
  11. BetterLateThanNever

    BetterLateThanNever Been here awhile

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    Maybe money can't by happiness with any certainty, but it can buy some freedom from worry which, for some of us, is part of the recipe for happiness. People confuse money with materialism sometimes, but when the sh*t hits the fan in life, the difference becomes stark. I don't need more stuff, but I'd never say no to a bigger savings account.
  12. dwizum

    dwizum Long timer

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    Are you sure you're not in the insurance business? :D
  13. TheProphet

    TheProphet Retired; Living the Dream

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    Agreed. But how much is required for basic comfort, or freedom from worry. Thousands? Hundreds of Thousands? Millions? Billions?

    This is why I think the (Adjusted for inflation, etc.) say $85,000/yr. figure from an earlier post might be a good starting point. Not a lot, not over the top, but properly managed might bring most folks the stability and worry free life they seek?

    I'm talking about say a single person, maybe a married couple, maybe a married couple with 1 or 2 kids max? I think they could live a nice, happy life within that income bracket. Many currently do I'm sure.

    As far as material things are concerned, the obvious challenge there is that often the current material thing isn't enough, once the new model or new version arrives. For some, it never ends.

    Turning off the TV commercials helps here.
  14. shakeybone

    shakeybone Long timer

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    Wave runner?
    Motorcycle :happay
  15. PlainClothesHippy

    PlainClothesHippy Riding an ugly bike.

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    Isn't that the truth. I learned from my grandfather to care for what you've got and make it last. I've watched guys that have to buy the latest and greatest compound bow each year (or more often than that sometimes). I've watched most of those same guys in my archery league go down in defeat to the old guy with the 20 year old bow (not me, I'm a different old guy with far less skill) who knows his equipment and cares for it. They spend thousands, he does not. He seems happier, too.
  16. TheProphet

    TheProphet Retired; Living the Dream

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    Agreed. It also explains why one guy with a clapped out, duct tape and baling wire assembled 30 year old motorcycle rides along sittin' tall with a huge grin on his face, while another guy on the brand new Diamond Plus Platimum Series IV Deluxe bike plods along with the proverbial "Cruiser Face".

    Simplify. Enjoy. Smile. Breathe. :-)
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  17. Lutz

    Lutz Fuzzy Rabbit

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    I'm personally still on the "more money = more happiness" part of the curve. :lol3

    Yeah, I'm surprised such a figure exists given all the uncertainty around it, but now after seeing and considering it, I'm surprised how accurate that conclusion seems (noting as the article did that it does not take into consideration larger family sizes, student loans, etc.). When we started our family, we earned well below that figure (even moreso considering my and my wife's student debt); but I can't really imagine us being happier than we were at that time. Now we earn a bit more than the figure, but also have two children; we're still happy, but it's clear that a bit more income would remove a lot of stress and uncertainty from our lives, and therefore make us happier. It's also clear that the work hours and conflicting work schedules we have are a big detractor from our happiness.

    If I could work fewer hours and keep the same income, my happiness would increase significantly. If I had to work more hours than I do, my happiness would decrease. If my income decreased significantly, my happiness would decrease significantly.

    We could get by on a lot less, but we'd be a lot better off with a little more. I guess you could say we're riding the income vs. happiness bubble.

    Edit: And if I were single (i.e. never married, never had kids) with that magical peak happiness income? I'd consider myself rich.
  18. TheProphet

    TheProphet Retired; Living the Dream

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    Which brings up the debate of becoming married being a life-choice, having children, and how many being a life choice, and choosing the level and degree of higher education being a life choice.

    Something we (The Mrs. and I)try to do every January is devote an entire Saturday to just sitting down, and reviewing where we are at, what we are spending money on and why, and then once the inventory is complete, making some "life" choices. You'd be surprised at what you can stop doing, which opens up a whole new avenue to either do something different, or do something else with the now saved capital.

    Cable TV, Magazine Subscriptions, various Projects, Trips, Vacations, etc., etc., all can be investigated as to worth, and usefulness, and then adjustments made. In the end, no matter what, there are still only 24 hours in a day, and only seven days in a week. HOW you spend them relates a ton to the "happiness" quotient.
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  19. BetterLateThanNever

    BetterLateThanNever Been here awhile

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    Agreed. But I think this makes error of confusing income with assets (a problem the press can't seem to get over, as an aside). Below is a link to the study you're referring to. Kahneman is a Nobel laureate, for what it's worth, and I'm a huge fan.

    The problem is, the study never actually addresses the question of wealth. It only considers income, and the ideal point at which lifestyle is both satisfying and affordable. I think the extent to which one feels insulated from your roof blowing off or a family member becoming ill or losing your job is a separate question.

    Madly off topic now. Thanks for indulging me :)

    https://www.princeton.edu/~deaton/d...igh_income_improves_evaluation_August2010.pdf
  20. TheProphet

    TheProphet Retired; Living the Dream

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    Give me a few hours to read it, and I'll get back to you. looks interesting for certain.

    It goes back to an old saying: "It's not how much money you have, but what you do with it that counts". A lot might be read into that, but to keep it simple:

    The "income or "wealth" of the two passing riders was never revealed. Both could be wealthy, both could be poor, or one wealthy, and one poor. Is it assumed that the rider of the clapped out bike is poor, and the deluxe bike owner wealthy? Why?

    Maybe the clapped our rider is wealthier BECAUSE of the fact that he is frugal with his ride, and the Deluxe rider is perhaps now poor, unfortunately having to make sizable monthly payments on the Deluxo-moto. This could also explain the happy and grim appearances.

    Certainly this is not a true analysis of every case, but serves as an example of appearances, and stereo-types. The fact remains that the majority of millionaires appear as normal, everyday, average people that dress moderately, that live in modest homes, drive mid-range auto's and likely bikes as well.

    People you see that flaunt wealthy appearances, and are very conspicuous in dress and possessions are more often than not merely up to their eyeballs - and more - in deep debt. Not all of course, but the majority.

    All that said, it's extremely difficult to gage wealth strictly from appearances, or to measure wealth by conspicuous material possessions - homes, cars, bikes, etc.

    Maybe a good start is for folks to generate a two column page. In the first column is what you feel you really NEED, in the second column what maybe you WANT, but don't necessary need. It opens up the mind for some thought.
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