Converted to dual-sport? POST PICS!!

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by Sinistersculler, Apr 11, 2008.

  1. bumblebee1

    bumblebee1 All bikes are dirt bikes

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    Do you find it top heavy compared to your KLR?
    Do you find the wheel size and wight a big obstacle? I noticed a wide front tire.
    Was the high ground clearance needed or would 2" more have been enough?

    I might as well explain where my questions are coming from.
    I have been looking around for a bike that would be better on the highway than my gs400 and still handle well on rough dirt roads. The ground clearance is an issue but not unmanageable for me (I just slow down or go around in the bad stuff).
    This is the stuff I'm talking about.
    [​IMG]

    I have 18" narrow rims front and back. This I appreciate. Trials 2.75 front and 3.50 rear.
    My biggest complaint is the limited wheel travel front and back. 2 inches more would do the trick (NO, my wife never said that to me).
    I think you may have solved a few of my gripes with your bike.

    All that remains is to find a spoke wheel that will fit the Kawi and it is then the perfect scrambler.

    Let me know what you think of this.

    Denis
  2. Nuclieye

    Nuclieye Custom Fit is my choice!

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    I like the larger tires as well as the stock rims and not spokes. I have some spoked rims if I wanted to use them but decided not to. The wide tires are great in sand and better in ruts.

    More pics from a ride 10 days ago showing the terrian we did with all that mud on the tires.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    It has a much lower center of gravity than the KLR and feels very light compared to it also. For where we go the clearance is important or you will tear the oil pan off. the road in your picture would be no problem on this bike.
  3. bumblebee1

    bumblebee1 All bikes are dirt bikes

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    Have you weighed your bike on bathroom scales yet. It would be interesting.
    You realize that you may have a more practical bike than a Vstrom on your hands.
    What were the spoked rims that fit on the kawi anyways. Are they a straight fit or machine work is needed.
  4. johnwesley

    johnwesley wanta be

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    here's your dirty goose

    [​IMG]
  5. StroupDog

    StroupDog Shut-it Beotch

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    This thread makes me wanna get a bag of weed and head to the shop. :norton
  6. johnwesley

    johnwesley wanta be

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    make sure and bring plenty of chips and twinkies :evil
  7. redditt

    redditt hi

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    Have you ever thought about rerouting the exhaust to really give it that scrambler look? That and some spoked and colored rims and it would be downright awesome!:eek1
  8. tonymorr

    tonymorr Malta,NY(Saratoga Spring)

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    Long distance dual sport/adventure bike..... how bout this?

    [​IMG]

    Hepco-Becker makes crash bars
    [​IMG]
    http://www.hepco-becker.de/anbauanleitungen/501944.0001.pdf

    Raise that front fender and throw on a set of these Shinko 705's 130/80-17 in front. Shinko lists it as a front or rear.
    [​IMG]


    Alaska? Goose Bay? Trans-Taiga?
  9. jdrocks

    jdrocks Gravel Runner

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  10. Zapp22

    Zapp22 ZAPP - Tejas

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    given no brakes, I guess you want the ground clearance just right for dragging your boots :eek1

    I'm about ready to try round 2 of Nekkid Weestrom. This will be fitting the front with DR650 forks and wheel. The wheel will have to have about 20mm spacer on each side, and will need to adapt the DR brake caliper to the DL system... sure hope I find some off/shelf parts that will let that happen. Then the issue will be getting enough spring in that front end to support the weight of the bike.
    I recall one of our forefathers on this type of project building one up, using XR400 parts for the frontend. The only way he could get it suitably sprung was going to gas-charging the front forks

    the Ninja/versys conversion may have an advantage in that appears to be more compact, vertically. What I noticed on my previous Weestrom project was, even though my inseam is 35", with just about 1.5" added to clearance, it was too tall for a lot of terrain.... If I happened to put the boot down in a 'hole' or dip, it got testy... And when trying to back out of an intractable situation on rough or gravely/rolly ground, it was just about impossible.
    Ground clearance has a flipside... sounds good in theory
  11. jdrocks

    jdrocks Gravel Runner

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  12. tonymorr

    tonymorr Malta,NY(Saratoga Spring)

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    ????
  13. JR Greenhorn

    JR Greenhorn Been here awhile

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    I've posted these in the Old School forum before, but here are some photos of my dirt-converted XS650:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    I apologize for that last one, but it's one of the only photos I have of the bike in the dirt, where it's spent the majority of its time. That photo is several years old; I was screwing around showing the ATV guys that the XS could pull around as big of logs as they could. No worries, I usually wear the complement of proper gear.





    The bike has obviously been done on the cheap, and I've sure gotten my money's worth out of it! Being a the cruiser-ish "Special" model originally, it came with 16/19 cast wheels. Switching the entire swingarm to one from a different year of the same bike got me the 18" rear wheel, and the drum brake turned out to be an upgrade from the Special's poor excuse for a disc.

    For a while, I ran it with that 18" rear (shown) and the stock forks and 19" cast front wheel. I had found a Kenda Trackmaster rear tire that fit that front rim, so I ran that for a while. The "rear knob on the front" thing works better than no knob at all, but it wasn't very ideal. Steering was much heavier with the knob than not.


    The fork change was the best thing I ever did to this bike, for what I'm doing with it at least. I got the entire front end off an '88 CR250 from a salvage yard, triple clamps, wheel, handlebars, everything. I found a the top steering head bearing off some Suzuki model that would fit in both locations on the XS650 steering head, but the Honda's shaft was 1mm too big. I had a competent machine shop turn the shaft down 1mm to fit, and slipped it all together. Turning down that shaft took the threads for the nut down too; I was very nervous about that at first, but haven't had a problem after many off-road-only miles.


    The CR fork and proper 21" front wheel took this bike from being a mere novelty off-road to being legitimately usable. Also helpful was the weight saved; including removal of other unnecessary parts on the bike, it weighed 420 lbs with a full tank of fuel, or 50 lbs less than a period magazine test claimed for the bike. And I haven't even done anything about the battery, battery box, and [disabled] electric starter yet.








    So what have I learned from this? Proper off-road-type forks and off-road standard tires/wheel sizes are worth the effort for a dirt conversion like this. Also, I should've found a rear rim that could handle more tire width. I think I've got a 3.50x18 on there, and the 120/100-18 (140/80-18) rears we've been running on our open class 2-strokes would really help a converted streetbike, for the weight first and foremost, but also for the power of course.

    Steering lock is a problem. Getting turned around in the woods, even on an ATV trail is always a pain in the ass, as is moving the bike around in the garage. The bike had a pristine fuel tank on it, which is safely on a shelf in favor of the deer-damaged one shown in the photos that I got from a buddy. This tank doesn't fit quite right, stealing even more of the steering lock.

    The '70s aftermarket crash bars are kind of ungainly, but again, some kind of protection like that should be a priority on a converted street bike like this. These bikes hit HARD when you go down, compared to a much lighter "real" dirtbike.

    Re-gearing was also crucial to off-road usability. Stock gearing was not only difficult to deal with difficult terrain, but lugging and constant clutch feathering would heat up the bike too much. Stock rear sprocket on this bike was a 34T, and I got a 42T made at Sprocket Specialists. It feels a bit too low actually (the XS650 has a very low first gear anyway), and I think a 40T would work better.

    Just for a sense of perspective to my comments, my 650 is 100% off-road-only--I don't even have a title or license plate for it.





    So what else can I say? This bike sure has been a blast! My favorite terrain for it is wide, sandy trails. The bike is heavy enough that it just plows through the sand, but with it's locomotive-like grunt (compared to "real" dirtbikes), you just grab another gear and dig and power through. Very satisfying!

    In fact, it's that locomotive-like grunt combined with surprising tractability that make this bike so much fun everywhere it goes off-road. You just put it in 3rd and torque-surf along ATV trails all day. Let 'er chug down to an idle in tighter corners, then crack the throttles and listen to that wonderful parallel twin "blat" as it comes on the boil and picks up revs.

    Most folks think this kind of thing is so wrong, but as shown, this bike works amazingly well off-road. It'll never be a "real" dirtbike, especially when it comes to tight or technical riding, but for wider trails, open spaces and smoother terrain, it'll surprise guys on dirtbikes and ATVs and flat run away from most of them if given the space. That YZ490 in the first photo will take it off the line, but not many other dirtbikes will, and the XS will catch and pass by the 490 before it tops out, and the XS still has another gear to go!

    Embarrassingly, when I ran this bike against a stripped-down Road Star my dad was rebuilding on a gravel road, the Road Star flat smoked the XS right from the line. Still, I can't imagine a dirt-converted Road Star on the trails, but I'd sure like to see one! Talk about you're locomotive-like off-road torque!
  14. Audacious Nick

    Audacious Nick Forever indecisive

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    My project:
    2000 Honda Superhawk and a WR250 front end. This one is going to be a bit different than yours though, as I am making a Motard rather than a dirt bike.
    Either way, it's gonna be exciting.
    Bike in question: [​IMG]
    Bike and forks:
    [​IMG]
  15. 40cu.in.of.furey

    40cu.in.of.furey Been here awhile

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    Isn't the NT700 basically a strictly street Trans Alp or visa versa?
  16. tonymorr

    tonymorr Malta,NY(Saratoga Spring)

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    Did you read the whole thread or did you start at post # 268?

    :bueller

    Use your imagination.....
  17. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    Thanks, that really helped
  18. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    They share similarities but it isn't just that the Deuville is simply a touring version of the TA. The engines are more or less the same, but it pretty much ends there.

    The closest bike to the NT700 is the NT650 Hawk GT.

    Lots of guys have swapped over the TA and AT engines onto their hawks.
  19. IceR

    IceR Lets go sideways

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    Indeed it is!
    :rilla

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  20. jdrocks

    jdrocks Gravel Runner

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