Copper Canyon MX Trip Planning

Discussion in 'Americas' started by steelincable, Mar 8, 2017.

  1. Raconnol

    Raconnol Long timer

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    I found the Topo Version of OSM maps of Mexico very helpful in BaseCamp.
    This is the route it came up with, however, I have no reason or experience to expect this route to be valid.

    Screen Shot 2017-03-14 at 5.51.24 PM.png

    Attached Files:

    #21
  2. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    That map looks like mostly the route as I remember it. It is not signed but asking a local driver will solve any questions .
    Even if you wind up taking the north road fork to the village labelled Mauricio you will be fine, on the highway to Creel.Actually judging by the map that is the "busier " road.
    In fact I may have done that because I did ride south a bit before hitting what passes for Bocoyna.
    #22
  3. steelincable

    steelincable n00b

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    Great, thanks!
    #23
  4. MizzouRider

    MizzouRider Long timer

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    Just checking on this trip. Are you guys planning on going March of 2018, or did you already go this last March?
    If you've already gone, how did the trip go? I'm in early planning stages of a March 2018 trip. We will be going out at the end of March though and returning around Apr 2nd.
    Would you mind sharing GPS tracks?
    Anyone else,, has the situation changed much since March, when these questions were being asked? Still safe travel to the canyon and back?
    I'll be on a KTM 690, without and addl fuel tank mods. I've got a rotopax, will it be needed?
    Thanks
    #24
  5. Chabochi

    Chabochi Adventurer

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    Still safe to travel in the canyons, as always. Fuel is readily available in most parts, even small pueblos. Fuel is a little more pricey these days though. Where you planning on going? I have some tracks if needed.
    #25
  6. Raconnol

    Raconnol Long timer

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    The rivers were very high in August, and everyone else was carrying during dinner at Carolina's in Batopilas, but my son and I had no issues or concerns in Copper Canyon. YĆ©cora was the most interesting and educational in the Narco Lifestyle, but again no issues for us.
    #26
  7. michaelbrux

    michaelbrux n00b

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    9/25/2017 - Making some changes to the original content as a fellow inmate thought some of the info might be confusing. Thanks @Sjoerd Bakker

    We went in March 2017. The trip was excellent and without any turmoil. I am not sure anyone from the group is watching the thread but I will send a text out to see if anyone has GPS tracks. Here are some lessons learned. Hope it helps

    1. Border and Import - Make sure you know what paperwork you need before you go We actually made it through customs and had to go back. You need to know what to ask for and you need to know it in Spanish. Seems like everyone in the customs office spoke less than zero English. Luckily we got help from someone in line. The TVIP is a bilingual form but you have to know to ask for it and someone there needs to understand you. Also you will have to pay an import deposit for every vehicle. When you come back to the US you will get your deposit back. The deposit must be paid for by credit card or US dollars. If paying for this Security Deposit with cash that will always be required to be in US DOLLARS. Maximum is $400US for the newest year models . We had to get copies of some of the forms and they many have only pesos. You can take care of the TVIP online ahead of time but if you cancel your trip and you don't live near the border it can be a real pain to get a refund. More about the TVIP and insurance here:

    https://www.mexpro.com/mexico/vehicle-import-permit.html


    2. Money - We were able to use credit cards at a lot of places. We used credit cards for big purchases like hotel, gas fill ups for all the bikes or big meals. The paper trail made it easier to divvy up expenses when we got home. I called my credit card company ahead of time to let them know I was traveling out of the country. I think there was at least one person who was never able to use his card despite informing the bank ahead of time. It's helpful to have extra cash for emergencies. Lots of people take US dollars but you will be at their mercy for exchange rate. Most of the smaller places where you will eat or buy things will not have the ability to take your credit card and it is just easier to do the transaction in pesos. There are lots of places within 100 miles of the border that exchange money. Don't rely on ATMs. We found lots that didn't work or were out of money.

    3. Communicating - It's helpful to know some Spanish. I barely passed High School Spanish over 20 years ago and a couple of the other guys had learned some words and phrases. That was enough to get us by but if we go back I will study for a few months

    4. Healthcare - Visit the doctor before you leave or make the pharmacy your 1st stop across the border. You want meds if the food doesn't agree with your body and wants to come out either end. We had both scenarios and they were from guys that prior wold travel experience. Make sure you buy travel insurance or know what your insurance covers. If you get hurt they will most likely want you to pay before services are rendered. Get yourself a SPOT or similar device.

    5. Gas - Rotopax is good. We had 2 bikes with 100 mile range and we had to use the rotopax 2x. You will need cash as you get closer to the bottom of the canyon. Also helpful to have a funnel. We had to pour gas out of a pitcher at least once.

    6. Bile repair - Make sure you bring a proper toolkit and extra tubes. We used our tool kit but not the tubes. Also have a plan for getting your bike out of the country if you can't ride it back. We almost had to rescue a bike south of Chihuahua. The tow strap came in handy and luckily we only had to use it for a few miles.

    7. Safety - Talk to the locals. They will tell you where it is not safe to ride. We only rode during the day. I would recommend not riding at night, dusk or dawn. We met one guy who was riding solo but I would not recommend that. He was sticking to roads and missing the good adventures. Also if you are riding solo there will be no one to help you when shit goes south. There were times where we didn't see another person for hours.

    8. Clothing - There can be a wide variance in temperature. I think we saw 30 degrees Fahrenheit difference some days.
    #27
  8. MizzouRider

    MizzouRider Long timer

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    Thank you very much Michael. The guy I'm riding with speaks Spanish, fairly well. Will have to start on paperwork for the bikes before too long.
    Thanks again.
    #28
  9. MizzouRider

    MizzouRider Long timer

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    My buddy is the driving force behind our trip. He's got a lot of his info from other forums, but I don't think he visits here. I know we are planning on hitting Chihuahua and Creel. Beyond that, just touring the canyon area. We are not looking for any extreme roads, or single track. Not looking to get near any of the "stay away from" places either. Both of us are in our mid 60s, and are reasonably comfortable off the tarmac.
    Thanks
    #29
  10. Raconnol

    Raconnol Long timer

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    Have you guys seen this video? It might be helpful in understanding where heavy ADV bike might go.

    #30
  11. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    """"Will have to start on paperwork for the bikes before too long. """"

    Whaddaya mean paperwork ? There isn't any paperwork .... unless you mean getting your state ownership and registration properly done up and officially documented in your name .
    Folk make way too much worry about the bit of business at the border . At Ojinaga you can get your FMM and TVIP stuff done on the spot in about 30 minutes . None of that crap of online ordering and waiting for mail delivery for a week or more .

    Funny that in the original posts there was the comment that in Mexico you won't find NAPA stores everywhere . Yeah , but you will have no trouble finding AUTO ZONE or PARTS ONE and a bunch of others in most fair sized towns .

    That video is interesting , but those guys seem more intent on racing through and showing off mud skills .

    If Mizzourider and your friends like exploring don't just restrict yourself to the " canyon area" . Have a look around Manitoba .
    Manitoba , Chihuahua that is . You might be surprised , lots of paved and gravel roads ( straight though)
    Find the MIRADOR in Campo 10 , just south of Alvaro Obregon and enjoy the vistas to Swift Current and to CUAUHTEMOC .
    This too is Chihuahua
    image.jpg
    If you need some minor bits like a battery or light bulbs , chain or tire repair drop by Motonoroeste in Vianna and also buy a soft drink in this modern motorcycle shop . The proprieter Isaak Unger can order in any tire you need if you are desperate or give him a few weeks lead time .
    #31