Cornering Techique

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by QatarRider, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. QatarRider

    QatarRider Qatar Rider

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    45
    Location:
    Qatar
    OK, so doubltless the 'old timers' will chuckle, but;

    I've got a 1956 Panther with chair in the UK, and ride it bolt upright, never move in the saddle, never have any issues with left hand bends (remember it's RHD, so chair on the left) (I've got a 1960 Dnepr too, but it's slow slow that all bends are straight!)

    Out here in Qatar I've got a Ural Retro, much lighter on the chair, and smaller wheels, so closer to the ground, and LHD drive, so chair on the right.

    If I exit a roundabout with any speed, that's on a right hand turn, the chair goes light and the buttocks start to clench. I thought about 50kg of sand in the chair, but then started to shift my weight over the chair on right handers.

    Two things happen, the chair is less inclined to fly, and as you unweight the rear wheel, by shifting weight to the sidecar wheel, the back end slips round, helping to complete the turn.

    Do other inmates do this?

    Rob
    #1
  2. BeeMaa

    BeeMaa Hack Pilot

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,098
    Location:
    NoVA
    To be short...yes, I shift my weight to the inside of ANY corner I am taking.
    I have experienced the pucker factor of flying the chair at speed.
    My bride was less than impressed and let me know it.
    Slow down and lean in, that's the ticket.
    Cheers.
    #2
  3. isaac-wombat

    isaac-wombat Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Oddometer:
    31
    Location:
    Gold Coast Hinterland Qld Australia
    And the LOOK, I'll betcha got the LOOK too? :rofl
    #3
  4. FirstPath

    FirstPath Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,349
    Location:
    Formerly Shoreview, MN
    In the right turn it's the lifting of the throttle that adds to the chair wanting to fly. Shift your weight toward the tub, stay on throttle and practice controlling the chair lift by applying front brake. Now keep in mind if your speed is too hot you'll still have issues. Practice, practice, practice and your understanding of controlling the rig is right on.

    Good luck...

    Scott in Shoreview
    '79 Suzuki GS550
    Sidecar-less for now
    #4
  5. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,133
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    I'm with BeeMaa. I shift my arse over on just about every curve right or left except for the really tame ones. That way, in case something unexpected happens like the chair wheel hitting a hole, I'm already in position to handle it.
    #5
  6. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,580
    Location:
    Winterpeg - site of flatness beyond belief
    I've got 2 rigs - a big heavy Goldwing GL1500, and a KLR650 rig. Riding the KLR rig I find I use a lot of body english on RH turns (the car is on the right side like it should be :^) , hanging my butt off the saddle to the right, and kind of pushing hard on the bars (kind of motocross style). Hard LH turns, I move my ass way back and hang off to the left to help keep the back wheel planted. I don't need to do it as much with the Goldwing, but still do it a bit - seems to reduce the pucker factor :D
    #6
  7. Boondox

    Boondox Travels With Barley

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,070
    Location:
    Northern Vermont
    I'm with BeeMaa. My sidecar companion is a gun dog, and though Barley looks meek and mild-mannered, he his the bane of small animals. The dog lunges after every squirrel, rabbit, and occasional bird. In my early days when I was just learning to fly, his left hand lunges took me by surprise a couple of times and it's a miracle of Body English that we didn't flip!

    So call me a wimp, but my norm is to shift weight forward and out for right hand turns, back and out for left.
    #7
  8. BeeMaa

    BeeMaa Hack Pilot

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,098
    Location:
    NoVA
    She has a mirrored face shield, but I will assume yes...I got the LOOK.
    Although I couldn't see her eyes, we do have an intercom...
    I'll let you imagine how that went.
    Cheers.
    #8
  9. kailuasurfer

    kailuasurfer Dreamer

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    379
    Location:
    PNW
    Also with BeeMaa. I always shift/slide my arse when turning as a matter of habit - I slide to 3 o'clock off my seat on right turns and 7 on left turns (with tub on right). (Shifting to 7 on my Ural seems to make front wheel skip across turns - not sure why the Ural behaves so differently. Any thoughts about this?)

    Also agree with Scott in Shoreview. I find throttle control and artful use of front brake absolutely critical for tub side turns. In most right turns, I find myself using just my right hand controlling the throttle and brake while "hanging out" near the tub.

    Because of all the shifting and sliding on my seat, I no longer wear my sticky motorcycle pants/suits on my rigs unless cruising long distances. I find jeans easier for shifting and sliding.

    With all the shifting and moving around, I find driving a sidecar much more physically demanding than riding on 2 wheels. My recent trip to the twisties near Suches, GA required extra doses of ibuprofen.
    #9
  10. NitroMax

    NitroMax Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 9, 2010
    Oddometer:
    687
    Location:
    Netherlands, Europe
    Yep :D
    #10
  11. Agent Wayward

    Agent Wayward Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    375
    Location:
    UK
    Uk, so left hand chair also.

    I keep the chair empty and it's light too. I aim to fly the chair whenever possible, especially in fast left hand sweeping turns. Because it's fun and perfectly controllable. :D

    If things are getting a bit too lairy, I lean into the chair and open the throttle wider, it soon calms down a bit.

    If you're getting nervous everytime the chair goes light, you need to practice some flying.
    #11
  12. jeffygs

    jeffygs Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    475
    Location:
    Middle of the US
    with my naked GL1100/ EML rig and maybe only 3K worth of sidecar experience. I have found with my rig set up properly and if I stay within the speed limit on turns I never have the pucker factor, exceed the SL and it seems to cause me to have lots of issues I don't want or need. So Ive decided to follow the speed limits in the twisties so I don't soil my Aerostich. Oh and I do a lot of leaning also
    #12
  13. FirstPath

    FirstPath Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,349
    Location:
    Formerly Shoreview, MN
    I've always maintained the idea that the posted speed limit in curves is posted just for sidecarists. If I push it like I can on 4 or 2 wheels I find it can get a bit hairy. Wandering into the oncoming lane is something I'd rather not do that's for sure.

    Scott in Shoreview
    '79 Suzuki GS550
    Sidecar-less for now
    #13
  14. vortexau

    vortexau Outside the Pod-bay

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,779
    Location:
    Just off the Warrego, S.E. Queensland
    [​IMG]
    Thats from
    Advanced Cornering Dynamics



    at Cycle Sidecar.

    [​IMG]
    Which helps explain why the Panther-outfit behaves differently. Of, course all this material (from Cycle Sidecar) depicts RHS-Sidecars.
    #14
  15. QatarRider

    QatarRider Qatar Rider

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    45
    Location:
    Qatar
    Cheers guys, more good answers from fellow sidecar nuts. Many thanks, Rob
    #15
  16. simmonsk133

    simmonsk133 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2010
    Oddometer:
    94
    Location:
    Augusta/Bville expressway
    When hanging to the right side, I get a huge kink in my right wrist. I can play through that. My real problem at the moment is keeping the right wheel on the pavement while in the turn.( out of the grass and dirt) Hopefully I wil survive the practice. Since I cannot tell in a parking lot where the wheel is, I am sticking to roads with a reasonably good shoulder. No ballast except the wife once and awhile. Thanks ...
    #16
  17. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,053
    Location:
    Middleburg, Pa. (Snyder County)
    hanging off is fine and adding ballast is fine (never put it in the nose of the sidecar). If one is going to hang off it is best to do it prior to getting into the turn. Practice is the number one key though.
    #17
  18. isaac-wombat

    isaac-wombat Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Oddometer:
    31
    Location:
    Gold Coast Hinterland Qld Australia
    I gotta ask... why not the nose? What's the effect?
    I'm close to buying my first sidecar so this is all new ta me.
    #18
  19. NitroMax

    NitroMax Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 9, 2010
    Oddometer:
    687
    Location:
    Netherlands, Europe
    Wrong weightdistribution, best place for ballast is on/under seat or just outside the tub, right behind the wheel.

    There are pics/diagrams to be found searching through Google, there's a nice pic here in this topic too!!
    #19
  20. mystery jig

    mystery jig Van Gogh's Banjo

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    118
    Location:
    State 'O' Maine
    I shift my rear end to the inside of any curve. I want it to be second nature for when I really need it. Speed is a factor, but also braking. If you have to brake in the turn, having your weight shifted is going to make all the difference.
    #20