Cost/Benefit/Payback of a car tire conversion

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by BMWzenrider, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad n00balicious

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    I guess I ain't like most folks and I'm not very typical, with my car tire conversion and using the stock wheel as a spare.

    [​IMG]
    #21
  2. DirtyDR

    DirtyDR Dana

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    Something like this?



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    #22
  3. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad n00balicious

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    Yeah, they don't know us very well, do they?:lol3
    #23
  4. DirtyDR

    DirtyDR Dana

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    I carry the stock rear for a spare, a commercial plug gun kit, an air compressor, a patch kit and a spare tube for the front tire in case I get a hole in it I can't plug. And of course over sized tire irons. :*sip*
    #24
  5. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

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    Belt AND suspenders kinda guy there, eh? :wink:

    I know that a couple of GS based rig owners also like being able to swap over to the stock wheel with a knobby on it on depending upon conditions.
    #25
  6. MIXR

    MIXR Been here awhile

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    I'm really torn about this. I like the added mileage you get from a low-cost car tyre, but it's another expense that I find hard to justify, particularly when it screws with the look of the rig. I have three wheels (pusher, chair and spare) that are all interchangeable. I could ride with a flat chair tyre because it's relatively light and the sidewalls are so stiff. It gives me the option of having two spare pusher wheels, all fitted out with disk rotors and a simple 4-bolt changeover. Of course, the front has no spare, but I do carry a compressor, plugs and all the rest of the gear for fixing flats. That said, I have had many rear flats in my time, but never a front flat.

    [​IMG]
    #26
  7. Mr. Cob

    Mr. Cob Howling "Mad", Adventurer

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    Howdy All,

    When I had Jay build my GS rig, I went with the car tires on the rear of the bike and the sidecar, same wheel and tire in both locations. I'd like to go with a car tire up front but haven't found a cost effective solution to that problem at this time. I have heard that Stroker makes a front tire wheel conversion for the GS but to be honest haven't done a lot of research on it.

    I had the GS rig built to be used as my freeway speed long distance machine. With the gears out of an 850 in the final drive ( 3.36:1 ) it has the grunt to get started on hills and still offers decent gas mileage, 4,000 rpm in 6th gear gives 70 mph and around 28-32 mpg. About the same gas mileage as the Ural and 20 mph faster. I haven't had the car tire equipped rig on the road long enough to have a qualified opinion on how well it works out cost wise, what I do know is that I am very hard on tires, I typically get about half the mileage out of a tire that most folks do. So with luck the car tire conversion will not take to long before it pays for itself at the rate I go through tires.
    #27
  8. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    I was grasping at a straw there to have an advantage over the car tire conversion, but you all had to rain on my parade. :fitz

    There actually is 1 car tire that will fit a stock Ural in all positions. It weighs almost twice that of MC tire, is super stiff, and is very much a street tread. It handles really nice, and has a larger than average circumference so it keeps the RPM's down on the freeway The down side it is a vintage design street tread so it offers little traction in poor conditions, and doesn't last significantly longer than a MC tire.
    #28
  9. Bobmws

    Bobmws Curmudgeon At Large

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    I was able to "cheap out" by using an Yokahama S-Drive on my 17" rear wheel. I had a very slight rub on the corner of the tread when the tire heated up and expanded at speed, just enough to make a shiny spot , not enough to make any detent in the rubber surface. I relieved that area of the tread with my air sander, that problem is solved.
    My one concern is that there is only one tire available in that size, 195/45-17, and may be an issue if replacement is needed on the road. I could always put a cycle tire back on if needed.
    Second, it was a screaming bitch to mount, won't be fun roadside, would of been a bit easier with a 2nd pair of hands. I do carry a compressor, plug gun & string plugs.
    I'm seriously considering getting an adapter, figure I can find a 15" wheel & tire most any where, and any shop will mount the tire.
    #29
  10. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

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    In my experience, the "vintage" car replacement tires are total crap!
    Coker makes a ton of money selling them to the antique/vintage car guys, but those are mostly only used in parades or sitting in a garage/museum. So there really is no incentive for them to use modern casings or rubber compounds.
    You will probably be very unhappy with the performance as well as the wear.

    And of course, gearing choices are always a compromise.
    Keeping the engine revs down at highway speeds usually means sacrificing power at takeoff without seriously abusing your clutch.

    Over the weekend I had been playing with my accumulated fuel economy data that I have been keeping for the current rig. You might be surprised how little engine speed has to do with fuel economy.
    I think what usually happens when you have a cycle/rig that is geared lower ther is more temptation to excersize that right wrist because it is just so much fun! :evil
    #30
  11. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

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    My bad, I thought you had gone with the Yokahoma S-Drive in that size.
    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/TireSearchResults.jsp?width=195/&ratio=45&diameter=17&sortCode=49582

    I didn't know that Avon offered one in that size here in the states.

    -----

    Yeah, one of the downsides of going "Darkside" using the stock bike wheel is that it can be difficult to find anyone willing to service the tire/wheel.
    Bike shops don't like you not buying the tire from them, and cite liability concerns about mounting a car tire on a bike wheel.
    Most Auto shops won't work on a bike wheel, period.
    #31
  12. Bobmws

    Bobmws Curmudgeon At Large

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    Karl, you were correct, I don't know why I typed in Avon, Doh! :huh Original post fixed.....
    #32
  13. halflive

    halflive Been here awhile

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    But these aren't Smart tires. These tires are 17" and intended for a GM sports car, like the Daewoo Speedster. It is indeed hard to get these cars in the US

    If i take a look at the website of the US based tire rack i can find three brands of 145/65/15 tires that would represent a Smart tire. I don't see a problem mail ordering a set.

    The 17" tires would be a bit more hassle. But we in Europe buy things from Asia and the US of A, Taking in aspect that you don't have to convert your rear wheel is may be worth the waiting for a shipment.

    Fitting a car tire is not that difficult. especially because they are tubeless. I have done it several times with minor tools and short tire levers. If i would travel to more remote area's i would probably take some tools and patches with me, but i wouldn't take the trouble of discussion with rubber sellers.
    Of course, when you manage to completely wreck a tire, you can always step back to a MC tire on the same rim and get home.
    #33
  14. pops

    pops Long timer

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    No brainer to me :D All of my wheels are tubless 15", even the trailer at last .
    We use to have a 19" front tyre 17" rear 15" sidecar and 13" trailer.

    Car Tyres are around $100.00 each .
    Motor bike tyres cost ? I think i was paying around $280 a while ago just for a rear tyre .

    But i still love the look of the bmw spoke wheels on a sidecar setup :1drink

    .

    Cheers Ian
    #34
  15. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    I actually did try them, really liked how they handled on the street, but otherwise offered no real advantage over MC tires, and a couple of disadvantages.
    #35
  16. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

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    As reported, the 195/45-17 is available here in the states, but so far as I know, only one version is available.


    Yes, I have purchased tires from TireRack.com before, in fact that is where my winter tire came from.
    And there are more choices in this size than there used to be, but IMHO the treadwear rating on the all-season versions being offered is truely pitiful.
    The summer(all-season) tire that I am currently using has a UTQG of 400, where the ones in the 145/65-15 size are only 240 & 340, so they would only last 1/2-3/4 as long if you are lucky.


    I have tried to get overseas tire companies to ship to the USA.
    So far I have not found any who will do it due to our DOT.
    Nobody wants to deal with the hassle for a small order to someone who isn't licensed to sell tires.


    YMMV...
    #36