counting chain links?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by snaggleXR650, Nov 4, 2006.

  1. snaggleXR650

    snaggleXR650 Been here awhile

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    I need to determine the length of chain on my '04 625 SXC. Do you count the rollers or side plates or what? Thanks for the information.
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  2. dirtypumpkin

    dirtypumpkin "Monster Truck Bike"

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    Side plates.
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  3. OldRider 125

    OldRider 125 Been here awhile

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    ???????????????

    Count your sprocket teeth and multiply by 2.....I think they were bullshiting you !!!! The sprockets don't know how far it is between them.

    To get the proper chain, count the rollers or I think it's easier to count the plates (master link too) then multiply by 2.

    A 120 link chain has 120 rollers.........
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  4. dirtypumpkin

    dirtypumpkin "Monster Truck Bike"

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    I remember them emailing me that Id need one link per tooth as a starting point.
    I was asking about making a gearing change when I emailed them for length.

    After looking it up the stock DRZ chain in 112, so that method isnt that great.

    Last I fit was a 116 to run a larger rear sprocket.

    Forget the method they told me, going to delete that bad advice...:deal

    This is in their chain info on the site, no mention of that other advice they emailed me.

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] HOW TO COUNT LINKS
    Every pair of sideplates (both inner and outer) counts as one link. Chains always have an even number of links.
    [/FONT]
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  5. Bayou Boy

    Bayou Boy Long timer

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    The above is incorrect. Every sideplate is one link. The reason you can only have even length chains is because you can't connect a wide link to another wide link.

    Your best bet is to count the rollers.
    #5
  6. SPEEDSMITH

    SPEEDSMITH Sh!t Disturber

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    Okay, here is the actual way to do it.
    Count all the outer plates (including the master link), and multiply by 2. (Only on one side of the chain, of course.):wink:
    Each plate (inner & outer) is considered 1 link, so, if you only count the outer plates, you must X2.
    #6
  7. OldRider 125

    OldRider 125 Been here awhile

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    Anyway you want to look at it or count it, if you order a 100 link chain, your going to get a chain with 50 plates on each side and 100 rollers. I see your point that 50 plates on each side equals 100 total, but I think the mfg's are referring to the number of pins in the chain.

    I edited my first post, I typed divide when I had multiply on the brain.....
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  8. jehu

    jehu ∩HƏſ

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    Oh yes you can! It' s called a one roller or half link.
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  9. OldRider 125

    OldRider 125 Been here awhile

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    Hree's the offical answer from EK's website. Each outer and inner pair of sideplate on the chain count as a link.

    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=300 border=0><TBODY><TR vAlign=top><TD>How do I count chain links?

    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=300 border=0><TBODY><TR vAlign=top><TD>Every pair of sideplates – both inner plates and outer plates – counts as one link when determining chain length. If your bike is supposed to have a 110-link chain, count every single inner and outer plate on one side of the chain until you reach 110.
    Chains will always have an even number of links. If your uninstalled chain has inner plates on both ends, or outer plates on both ends, you’ve miscounted.

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    Every pair of sideplates – both inner plalinks. If your uninstalled chain has inner plates on both ends, or outer plates on both ends, you’ve miscounted.

    </TD></TR><TR vAlign=bottom align=left><TD height=160>[​IMG]</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    #9
  10. snaggleXR650

    snaggleXR650 Been here awhile

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    It's amazing how such a simplistic idea can get so complicated. I've been riding bikes forever, and I'm a decent wrench, but I never really knew 'for sure' how to count links in a chain. I'm used to Honda specifying the # of links in the manual. Now, with my KTM, the manual doesn't state the # of links, so I'm lost ;)

    I counted rollers, and came up with 114 links. I'll redo my count with sideplates X 2 and see if I come up with 57 links. Thanks.
    #10
  11. Bayou Boy

    Bayou Boy Long timer

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    I can't think of a single motorcycle (or bicycle) that I would feel comfortable riding with that tiny pin in the chain link.

    Just because it's possible doesn't make it a good idea.:deal
    #11
  12. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    Can also mark that pin and the forward or rear tooth ....turn and count until she comes back around. You know how many teeth are on the rear. A 20 second deal.
    #12
  13. jehu

    jehu ∩HƏſ

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    I've seen them in use on vintage bikes. I've never really understood why anyone would need or want one but it's an old technology.
    #13
  14. katbeanz

    katbeanz earthbound misfit, I

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    +1
    Half links or offset links are nothing but trouble. They may be OK in something really low speed or really hard to adjust. :puke1
    #14
  15. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

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    Wow, that is the very first time I ever saw one of those!
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  16. OldRider 125

    OldRider 125 Been here awhile

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    There's a lot of 4-wheelers and small dirt bikes that have almost no chain adjustment and the chain will be stretched out enough that the adjuster will not take all the slack out, but the chain is still in very good condition. Then if you cut a set of rollers out and pull the adjuster all the way foreword, the chain is now too short. This is when the customer comes in wanting a 1/2 link. I always recommend that they fix the problem by changing the front sprocket. Either go up one tooth until the chain stretches a little more or cut out a set of rollers and drop a tooth.. I've seen a lot of 1/2 links used on small bikes & 4-wheelers, but I wouldn't want one on a street bike. My.02 worth.......
    #16
  17. qchdrider

    qchdrider n00b

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    a master and a half in the tool bag is good get ya home option
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