County Courthouses of Georgia Thread!

Discussion in 'Southeast, The Lair of the Dragon - The Blue Ridge' started by jub jub, Sep 9, 2013.

  1. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Damn dude, guess I should just kick back and wait until your done! :lol3

    Something tells me this has been done before. We're not repeating ourselves here, are we?

    Hey Ernie, if you get a chance, can you go grab the tag. It hasn't moved in a while. :D
    #21
  2. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    Challenge accepted.
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  3. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Thank you sir! :freaky
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  4. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    Bartow County courthouse in Cartersville

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    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="2" height="211" width="408"><tbody><tr><td width="70%">Location: Cartersville
    Date Built: 1902
    Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival
    Designer: Kenneth McDonald and J.W. Golucke

    </td> <td width="30%"> <center>[​IMG] </center> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Other Information: At the time of Bartow County's creation in Dec. 1832, much of what originally was known as Cass County was occupied by Cherokee Indians, which delayed organizing the new county's government. In Dec. 1833, the legislature designated Cassville as county seat. What county officials initially used as a courthouse is not known, though at some point a courthouse was built. When Sherman's forces came through Bartow County in 1864, the courthouse and town were burned. In 1867, Bartow County voters approved a referendum to move the county seat to Cartersville. For six years, the county operated without a courthouse, but in 1873 a new courthouse was completed. Unfortunately, it was located so close to the railroad that court proceedings were interrupted when a train would pass through town. Still, the courthouse was used until a new one was built in 1902. [For early photos of the courthouse, see postcard 1 and postcard 2.] This courthouse is still in use, but the growth of Bartow County in recent decades led county officials to build the Frank Moore Administration and Judicial Center in 1992 (see photo). Frank Moore was sole commissioner of Bartow County from 1980 until his death in 1991. The complex that bears his name now serves as the principal courthouse for Bartow County -- though some court sessions continue to be held in the old courthouse.
    County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
    County History: Bartow County, originally known as Cass County, was created from Cherokee County on Dec. 3, 1832 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1832, p. 56). [Click here for complete text of legislation.] According to the 1832 act :
    . . . such parts of the twenty-first, twenty-second and twenty-third districts of the second section as lie west of the line herein-before designated, and the fourth, fifth, sixth, fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth districts of the third section, shall form and become one county, to be called Cass.
    In way of background, by 1830, the Cherokee Nation consisted of most of northwest Georgia (see map), plus adjoining areas in Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Even while Cherokee Indians remained on their homeland in Georgia, the General Assembly on Dec. 21, 1830 enacted legislation claiming "all the Territory within the limits of Georgia, and now in the occupancy of the Cherokee tribe of Indians; and all other unlocated lands within the limits of this State, claimed as Creek land" (Ga. Laws 1830, p. 127). The act also provided for surveying the Cherokee lands in Georgia; dividing them into sections, districts, and land lots; and authorizing a lottery to distribute the land. On Dec. 26, 1831, the legislature designated all land in Georgia that lay west of the Chattahoochee River and north of Carroll county as "Cherokee County" (see map) and provided for its organization (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 74). However, the new county was not able to function as a county because of its size and the fact that Cherokee Indians still occupied portions of the land. On Dec. 3, 1832, the legislature added areas of Habersham and Hall counties to Cherokee County, and then divided the entire area into nine new counties -- Cass (later renamed Bartow), Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union -- plus a reconstituted and much smaller Cherokee County.
    Portions of Cass County were used to created Gordon County in 1850 (Ga. Laws 1849-50, p. 124).
    Georgia's 87th county originally was named for Pres. Andrew Jackson's Secretary of War, Gen. Lewis Cass of Michigan. Later, Cass's abolitionist and pro-Union views made him unpopular in Georgia. Following the death of Col. Francis Bartow in the First Battle of Manassas (Bull Run), the General Assembly changed the name of Cass County to Bartow County on Dec. 6, 1861 (Ga. Laws 1861, p. 101).
    County Seat: The 1832 act creating Cass County provided that the first justices of the inferior court were authorized to select a county seat and provide for erection of public buildings. What action the inferior court took is not known, but on Dec. 24, 1833, the General Assembly designated Cassville as county seat and incorporated the town (Ga. Laws 1833, p. 318). An act of Nov. 24, 1857 provided for a referendum in June 1858 to move the county seat from Cassville (Ga. Laws 1857, p. 256). If a majority of voters favored removal, a second referendum would be held in August 1858 allowing voters to indicate their choice for a new county seat.
    Presumably, the 1858 referendum left Cassville as county seat. Six years later, Sherman's forces burned Cassville, leaving Bartow County without a seat of government. Court sessions were moved to Cartersville, which prompted another effort to designate a new county seat.
    An act of Nov. 12, 1866 directed that a referendum be held on the first Monday in January 1867 on the location of Bartow's county seat (Ga. Laws 1866, p. 36). That act noted in its preamble: "Whereas, the county site of Bartow county was entirely destroyed by the Federal army; and whereas, the former citizens of said town have declined an attempt to rebuild it; and whereas, the people of said county are desirous of locating the site at some point on the Western & Atlantic Railroad . . . ." This time voters chose Cartersville as the new county seat. Cartersville had been incorporated by an act of Feb. 1, 1850 (Ga. Laws 1849-50, p. 103). The town was named for Farish Carter, one of Georgia's largest landowners before the Civil War and a frequent visitor to the settlement that would later bear his name.


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  5. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    Dawson County courthouse in Dawsonville
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    Location: Dawsonville
    Date Built: 2011

    Architectural Style: Modern


    Other Information: Dawson County's first courthouse was a two-story brick building [see photo] located in the town square of Dawsonville. That building served as courthouse until 1978, when a modern two-story courthouse was built a block north of the old courthouse. An even newer structure has recently replaced the old courthouse and jail.

    County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
    <center>[​IMG] </center> County History: Dawson County was created on Dec. 3, 1857 from Gilmer and Lumpkin counties by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1857, p. 32). Georgia's 119th county was named in honor of noted lawyer, state legislator, soldier, U.S. Representative, and U.S. Senator William C. Dawson, who had died the previous year.
    County Seat: The act creating Dawson County empowered the judges of the inferior court to select a site for location of the county seat. They selected a site and named it Dawsonville in honor of William C. Dawson.


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  6. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    Lumpkin County courthouse in Dahlonega
    Historic courthouse
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    Location: Dahlonega
    Date Built: 1836
    Architectural Style: Modern
    Designer:
    Other Information: Lumpkin County's first courthouse was a log cabin at the gold rush town of Auraria. In 1836, the county built a two-story brick courthouse (see photos and story), which served until a new courthouse was built in 1965. Since that time, the former courthouse has served as the Dahlonega Gold Museum.
    <center>[​IMG] </center> County History: Lumpkin County was created from Cherokee County on Dec. 3, 1832 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1832, p. 56). [Click here for complete text of legislation.] According to the 1832 act :
    . . . so much of the said county of Cherokee as lies within the fourth, fifth, twelfth, thirteenth, fifteenth, and such parts of the sixth and eleventh districts of said first section, as lies south of the mountains, to be more particularly designated by a line hereafter to be run including such parts of the counties of Hall and Habersham herein-before added to said county of Cherokee, shall form and become one county, to be called Lumpkin.
    In way of background, by 1830, the Cherokee Nation consisted of most of northwest Georgia (see map), plus adjoining areas in Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Even while Cherokee Indians remained on their homeland in Georgia, the General Assembly on Dec. 21, 1830 enacted legislation claiming "all the Territory within the limits of Georgia, and now in the occupancy of the Cherokee tribe of Indians; and all other unlocated lands within the limits of this State, claimed as Creek land" (Ga. Laws 1830, p. 127). The act also provided for surveying the Cherokee lands in Georgia; dividing them into sections, districts, and land lots; and authorizing a lottery to distribute the land. On Dec. 26, 1831, the legislature designated all land in Georgia that lay west of the Chattahoochee River and north of Carroll county as "Cherokee County" (see map) and provided for its organization (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 74). However, the new county was not able to function as a county because of its size and the fact that Cherokee Indians still occupied portions of the land. On Dec. 3, 1832, the legislature added areas of Habersham and Hall counties to Cherokee County, and then divided the entire area into nine new counties -- Cass (later renamed Bartow), Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union -- plus a reconstituted and much smaller Cherokee County.
    Georgia's 82nd county was named for Georgia governor Wilson Lumpkin, who held office at the time of the county's creation. Formerly U.S. representative, and later elected U.S. senator, Lumpkin was active in all three roles in seeking removal of Georgia's Cherokee Indians.
    In 1857, part of Lumpkin County was used to help form Dawson County.
    County Seat: Dahlonega [name derived from Cherokee phrase for "golden color"; incorporated as Talonega and designated county seat on Dec. 21, 1833; redesignated Dahlonega in 1835]
    Previous county seat: Auraria [formerly named Nuckollsville and designated provisional county seat when Lumpkin County was created 1832].


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  7. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    White County courthouse in Cleveland
    Historic courthouse

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    The original White County courthouse was built in Cleveland in 1859. When the current courthouse was occupied in 1964, the old building was converted into a museum. <center>[​IMG] </center> County History: White County was created from Habersham County on Dec. 22, 1857, by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1857, p. 44). Georgia's 125th county was named for Newton County state representative David T. White, who helped get legislation creating the county passed.
    County Seat: Cleveland [named in honor of Maj. Benjamin Cleveland, a hero of the American Revolution's Battle of Kings Mountain who was an early settler of Habersham County]. Settled in 1857 and incorporated by the General Assembly on Aug. 18, 1870


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  8. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    Union County historic courthouse in Blairsville

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    [SIZE=+1]L[/SIZE]ocation: Blairsville
    Date Built: 1899
    Architectural Style: Romanesque Revival
    Designer: Golucke & Stewart
    Other Information: After the previous courthouse was destroyed by fire, the above two-story courthouse with clock tower was built in 1899 in the town square using hand-fired bricks made locally (see early photo). Apparently, the brick were not fired for an adequete length of time and began to disintegrate gradually. Also, the courthouse was plagued continuously by a leaking roof, falling plaster, and decaying woodwork. By 1956, the courthouse clock tower was leaning noticeably (see photo), so in 1959 it was removed and the clock placed in storage. In 1971, the courthouse was condemned as unsafe -- but residents were successful in convincing the county's sole commissioner not to tear the historic building down. Thereafter, county court sessions were held in the local civic center, while other county officials continued in the old courthouse or moved to rented office space in several downtown buildings. Subsequently, a site two blocks away was purchased for construction of a new Union County Office Building. Rehabilitation of the old courthouse began in 1976, with the facility becoming headquarters of the Union County Historical Society. In 1985, rededication ceremonies for the old courthouse were held. Later, the courtroom on the second floor of the old courthouse was restored and occasionally is used today for court sessions. Fund raising began in the late 1990s for installation of a new clock tower with electronic clock and sound system for the old courthouse.Construction of the new clock tower was completed in November 2000.
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  9. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    Fannin County courthouse in Blue Ridge

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    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="2" height="211" width="408"><tbody><tr><td width="70%">Location: Blue Ridge
    Date Built: 2001-2004
    Architectural Style:
    Designer:

    </td> <td width="30%">[​IMG] </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Other Information: The act creating Fannin County authorized the justices of the county's inferior court to select a county seat and provide for construction of a courthouse and other public buildings. Until such action was taken, the act directed that county business and elections take place at Joab Addington's Store. Fannin County's first courthouse, a small wooden structure, was built in Morgantown. Little is known about when, except that it reportedly burned down. In 1895, the county seat was moved to the town of Blue Ridge, where a two-story brick courthouse was built in 1895-96 (see photo 1 and photo 2). The courthouse burned in 1936, and a new courthouse was completed the following year funded by the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works (see photo).
    In 2000, Fannin County voters approved a special-purpose local option sales tax to finance construction of a new courthouse and jail complex next door to the 1937 courthouse. An architect was selected in November 2000, with construction beginning the following year. Construction of the new courthouse was completed and the new building occupired in the spring of 2004. In July 2004, theBlue Ridge Mountain Arts Association began leasing the old courthouse, which was renamed The Georgia Mountain Center for the Arts.
    County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
    County History: Fannin County was created from Gilmer and Union counties on Jan. 21, 1854 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1853-54, p. 298). That legislation specified Fannin County's boundaries as:
    Beginning at the North-west corner of Lot No. 163, 27th District, 2d Section, thence South to the South-west corner of Lot No. 180, 27th District, 2d Section, thence East to Lot No. 9 in the 7th District and 2d Section, thence on a straight line to the South-east corner of the 7th District and 2d Section, thence South with the district line to Lot No. 9 in the 6th District and 1st Section, thence North-east with the Blue Ridge to Lot No. 228, thence in a straight line to William Cavender's in the county of Union, thence due North to the top of the Ridge dividing the waters of Tacoah and Notley rivers, thence along the top of the said dividing Ridge North west to the head of Dooly Creek, thence in a North direction along the top of the main ridge to the North Carolina line at or near Jesse Raper's, thence along the North Carolina line to the line dividing Tennessee and Georgia, thence along said line to the starting point. [Note: Instead of lot 228, as noted above, the 1854 act specified lot "162 on the district line between 5th and 6th of the 1st Section at the Lumpkin line." However, in 1891, the legislature replaced this quoted language with "228" stating that reference to lot 162 in the 1854 act had been a "clerical error" (Ga. Laws 1890-91, p. 240).]
    Georgia's 107th county was named for Col. James Fannin (1804-1836), a Georgian who fought in the War for Texas Independence and was killed at Goliad.
    County Seat: The legislation creating Fannin County directed the justices of the county's inferior court to select the location of the county seat, with the only stipulation that the site be as near the center of the county as practicable. Until a county seat was designated and a courthouse built, the act directed that county business and elections take place at Joab Addington's Store. Subsequently, the inferior court designated Morganton as county seat. Reportedly, James Morris, an early settler, named Morganton after his previous hometown of Morganton, North Carolina. On March 5, 1856, the General Assembly incorporated Morganton (Ga. Laws 1855-56, p. 353). In June 1895, two-fifths of the voters of Fannin County signed a petition to change the county seat to the town of Blue Ridge. On Aug. 13, 1895, a referendum was held in which over two-thirds of the voters approved removal of the county seat. Based on that election, the General Assembly enacted legislation on Dec. 13, 1895, changing the county seat from Morganton to Blue Ridge (Ga. Laws 1895, p. 420). Blue Ridge, named for the Blue Ridge Mountains, had been incorporated by the legislature by an act of Oct. 24, 1887 (Ga. Laws 1887, p. 647).

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  10. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    Gilmer County courthouse in Ellijay

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    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="2" height="211" width="408"><tbody><tr><td width="70%">Location: Ellijay
    Date Built: 2007-08
    Architectural Style:
    Designer:

    </td> <td width="30%"> <center>[​IMG] </center> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Other Information: The Dec. 1832 act creating Gilmer County provided that "the place where Ned Tucker recently lived" would serve as the county's initial courthouse and place for holding elections. The law also authorized an election of county officials in March 1833 and provided that the first justices of inferior court select the county seat of Gilmer County and provide for erection of a courthouse and other county buildings. That year, the inferior court chose Ellijay as county seat and had a wooden courthouse built here. In 1854, a new courthouse was built, which would serve the county for the next 80 years.
    In 1898, the Hyatt Hotel was constructed facing the downtown square in Ellijay. The two-story brick building was converted for use as the Gilmer County courthouse in 1934 (see photo). Later, a private brick home across the street from the courthouse was purchased and converted into a courthouse annex and home for the Gilmer County Commission (see photo).
    In March 2003, the county fire marshall condemned the Gilmer County courthouse because of extensive code violatiions. The building was closed on March 27, forcing the county to find alternative facilities for courts and county officials who had been housed in the courthouse.
    County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
    County History: Gilmer County was created from Cherokee County on Dec. 3, 1832 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1832, p. 56). [Click here for complete text of legislation.] According to that act:
    . . . the fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, twelfth and such parts of the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth districts as lie east of a line commencing at the centre of the south line of the twenty-fourth, and running due north to the north line of the twenty-fifth, and so much of the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh districts of said second section, as lies east of a range of mountains running north and south through said district, shall form and become one county, to be called Gilmer.
    In way of background, by 1830, the Cherokee Nation consisted of most of northwest Georgia (see map), plus adjoining areas in Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Even while Cherokee Indians remained on their homeland in Georgia, the General Assembly on Dec. 21, 1830 enacted legislation claiming "all the Territory within the limits of Georgia, and now in the occupancy of the Cherokee tribe of Indians; and all other unlocated lands within the limits of this State, claimed as Creek land" (Ga. Laws 1830, p. 127). The act also provided for surveying the Cherokee lands in Georgia; dividing them into sections, districts, and land lots; and authorizing a lottery to distribute the land. On Dec. 26, 1831, the legislature designated all land in Georgia that lay west of the Chattahoochee River and north of Carroll county as "Cherokee County" (see map) and provided for its organization (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 74). However, the new county was not able to function as a county because of its size and the fact that Cherokee Indians still occupied portions of the land. On Dec. 3, 1832, the legislature added areas of Habersham and Hall counties to Cherokee County, and then divided the entire area into nine new counties -- Cass (later renamed Bartow), Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union -- plus a reconstituted and much smaller Cherokee County. Cherokee lands were distributed to whites in a land lottery, but the legislature temporarily prohibited whites from taking possession of lots on which Cherokees still lived. By 1833, however, whites began occupying areas of Gilmer County.
    Georgia's 85th county was named for George R. Gilmer, who served two terms as Georgia governor (1829-1831, 1837-1839), as state legislator, and as U.S. congressman. Gilmer -- a strong proponent of state sovereignty over Cherokee lands in Georgia -- was governor at the time of the Cherokee's forced removal to the west.
    As originally constituted, Gilmer County extended to the Tennessee border (see map). Later created in part or whole from its original boundaries were Pickens, Fannin, and Dawson counties.
    County Seat: The Dec. 1832 act creating Gilmer County authorized election of county officials in March 1833 and provided that the first justices of inferior court select a location to serve as county seat. Subsequently, the inferior court chose Ellijay as county seat. On Dec. 20, 1834, the state legislature designated Ellijay as permanent county seat of Gilmer County. That legislation also named town commissioners for Ellijay and gave them the "power and authority to make all such by-laws for the government and good order of the said town of Ellijay as may be necessary . . . ." In effect, the Dec. 20, 1834 act incorporated Ellijay as an official town, although not using the terms "incorporate" or "incorporation." On Dec. 19, 1840, the legislature passed new legislation for Ellijay, this time specifically incorporating the town.
    Ellijay originally was a Cherokee town named Ellija, a name believed to have been a Cherokee reference to a green place -- perhaps because the town was settled on a river. The town was located on the Ellijay Road, which branched off the Cherokee Federal Road just west of Talking Rock and traveled northeastward into North Carolina. By 1833, whites had settled the site of Ellija, calling it Ellijay.
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  11. HPTuner

    HPTuner Been here awhile

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    Just tell us the ones you ain't got! LOL! :lol3
    #31
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  12. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    I could have had almost all of them if I had only taken the time to get them during my rides to all of the Grand Tour of Georgia stops.

    At any rate,... I am trying to make a small contribution to Jub's site while I still can.:freaky
    #32
  13. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    and you're doing a good job. Save me some gas and tire wear. :lol3
    #33
  14. Mr&MrsErnbo

    Mr&MrsErnbo ...

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    Montgomery Courthouse in Mount Vernon

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    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="2" height="211" width="408"><tbody><tr><td width="70%">Location: Mount Vernon
    Date Built: 1907
    Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival
    Designer: Alexander Blair

    </td> <td width="30%"> <center>[​IMG] </center> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Other Information: The 1793 act creating Montgomery County provided the court sessions be held at the residence of William Neal until a courthouse and jail could be erected. A 1797 act provided that the courthouse, jail, and other county business be held at the plantation of Arthur Lott. How long Lott's plantation home served as courthouse is not known. In 1813, the legislature designated Mt. Vernon as county seat, and at some point a courthouse was built. Likely, it was a small frame building, for in 1836 the legislature authorized the clerks of superior and inferior court to keep their offices at any place within one mile of the courthouse. In 1838, the legislature authorized the inferior court to levy a special tax to build a jail and repair the courthouse. Presumably, several courthouses were constructed during the 19th century. Montgomery County's current courthouse was completed in 1907 (see photo) and substantially rehabilitated in 1991-92.
    County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
    County History: Montgomery County was created from Washington County by an act of the General Assembly approved Dec. 19, 1793 (Ga. Laws 1793, p. 10). Georgia's 20th county was named for Continental Army general Richard Montgomery (1736-1775), who was mortally wounded on Dec. 31, 1775 at the Battle of Quebec during the early stages of the American Revolution.
    Portions of Montgomery County were used to create the following counties: Tattnall (1801), Emanuel (1812), Dodge (1870), Toombs (1905), Wheeler (1912), and Treutlen (1918).
    County Seat: The 1793 act creating Montgomery County did not designate a county seat but provided that court sessions be held at the residence of William Neal until a courthouse and jail could be erected. An act of Feb. 8, 1797 provided that the courthouse, jail, and other county business be held at the plantation of Arthur Lott, which was designated the county seat of Montgomery County (Ga. Laws 1797, p. 33).
    In 1813, the General Assembly designated the settlement of Mount Vernon as county seat (Ga. Laws 1813, p. 44). Later, a number of Montgomery County residents sought to have the location of the county seat changed. In response, the 1857 legislature passed an act directing:
    "That the Justices of the Inferior Court of Montgomery county, or a majority of them, are hereby required, by giving due notice at least twenty days before said election, to have opened at the Court House and several precincts in said county, a poll or election, to ascertain whether a majority of said voters desire the removal of the county site from Mount Vernon, the voters endorsing on their tickets removal, or no removal.
    "That should a majority of said voters vote removal, then the Justices of the Inferior Court, or a majority of them, shall procure some suitable place as near the centre of said county as practicable, where at least ten acres of land can be obtained on the best terms, for the location of the county site, and shall cause the same to be laid off in town lots, and sold at public outcry, on the ground, to the highest bidders, after having first given at least sixty days notice of said sale in two or more of the public gazettes of this State, retaining at least two acres for public use, and after the sale of said lots the Justices of the Inferior Court shall provide for the erection of public buildings in such manner as they, or a majority of them, shall think proper" (Ga. Laws 1857, p. 259).
    Whether a referendum to move the county seat actually was held is not known, but if it was, voters turned it down. Mount Vernon is presumed to have been named for the Virginia plantation home of George Washington. The date of its initial settlement is not known, but Mount Vernon was incorporated by the legislature on Aug. 26, 1872

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  15. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    I'll chip in - first post. Vic took my home county courthouse (Macon), so i have traveled further afield for these....

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    Location: Butler

    Date Built: 1935

    Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival with Colonial Revival clock tower

    Designer: F. Roy Duncan

    The act creating Taylor County provided that until a courthouse could be built, the Fifty Mile Station on the Muscogee Railroad would serve as temporary courthouse. Sometime thereafter, a new courthouse was built in Butler. This building was torn down in 1935 and replaced by the current courthouse

    Left the house this morning at 0830 hrs, back home at 1345 hrs -- 8 courthouses in the bag.

    travis
    #35
  16. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    Macon County GA
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    Location: Ellaville

    Date Built: 1899

    Architectural Style: Romanesque Revival

    Designer: Golucke & Stewart




    travis
    #36
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  17. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    Macon County GA
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    County History: Sumter County was created from Lee County on Dec. 26, 1831, by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 76). In 1857, portions of Sumter County were used to create Schley County (Ga. Laws 1857, p. 42).

    Georgia's 80th county was named Gen. Thomas Sumter (1734-1832), who at the time of the county's creation was 97 years of age and the last surviving general officer of the American Revolution.

    travis
    #37
    jub jub likes this.
  18. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2013
    Oddometer:
    943
    Location:
    Macon County GA
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    And they have a time capsule!

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    Location: Leesburg

    GPS Coordinates: 31.3264, 84.17130

    Date Built: 1917-18

    Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

    Designer: J.J. Baldwin


    Other Information: The Dec. 14, 1826 act naming and organizing Lee County providing that on the first Monday in May 1827, voters of Lee County would assemble at "Pond Town, or Williams' Store" and elect county officials (Ga. Laws 1826, p. 57). The act also authorized the justices of the inferior court to select a county seat and build a courthouse and jail. An act of Dec. 22, 1828 that organized the county provided that initial county elections would be held in the home of Benjamin Matthews (Ga. Laws 1828, p. 63). That same act authorized the first justices of the county's inferior court to contract for erection of a courthouse and other county buildings. What served as courthouse for the next nine years is not known, but reportedly a courthouse was built in Starkville in 1837. In 1854, the General Assembly repealed Starkville's status as county seat and directed that a commission select a new county seat by Oct. 15, 1854. That commission selected a new site, which the county seat was moved to Webster, where a new courthouse was built.

    What happened next is not exactly clear. Lee County's courthouse is known to have burned -- though sources differ as to 1856 or 1858. In Feb.1856, the legislature designated Starkville again as county seat (Ga. Laws 1855-56, p. 117). The old 1837 courthouses was used until it was destroyed by fire in 1856 or 1858 (sources vary). On March 1, 1856, the legislature authorized Lee County to levy a special tax for construction of a new courthouse and jail (Ga. Laws 1855-56, p. 546). Construction of the new courthouse was completed in Feb. 1861.

    On Aug. 20, 1872, the General Assembly moved Lee's county seat from Starkville to Wooten Station (see map) on the Southwestern Railroad (Ga. Laws 1872, p. 264). That act named commissioners with responsibility for erecting a courthouse and jail at the new county seat. A building in Wooten used as a temporary courthouse burned in 1872. In 1873, the legislature authorized Lee County to borrow up to $10,000 to build a new courthouse and jail (Ga. Laws 1873, p. 229). Construction began on a courthouse but was halted in Nov. 1874 after a grand jury recommended that the unfinished building and all materials be sold. Subsequently, various buildings were rented until a new courthouse was completed in Dec. 1880. This courthouse served until the present courthouse was completed in 1918. A rear addition was built in 1975.

    travis
    #38
    jub jub likes this.
  19. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2013
    Oddometer:
    943
    Location:
    Macon County GA
    The least attractive courthouse seen this day.....

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    at least there is a concrete turtle to look at.

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    Location: 225 Pine Ave., Albany

    GPS Coordinates: 31.57861, 84.15246

    Date Built: 1968

    Architectural Style: Modern

    Designer: Unknown

    County History: Dougherty County was created Dec. 15, 1853 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1853-54, p. 296). Dougherty County was formed entirely from Baker County.
    Additionally, portions of Worth County were transferred to Dougherty County in 1854 and 1856. Georgia's 103rd county was named for Athens judge Charles Dougherty, a strong advocate of states' rights in the 1850s.

    County Seat: The act creating Dougherty County designated Albany as county seat. Believed to have been named for Albany, N.Y., Albany was settled in 1837 in what was then Baker County. The General Assembly incorporated Albany as a town on Dec. 27, 1838 (Ga. Laws 1838, p. 128).

    travis
    #39
    jub jub likes this.
  20. HPTuner

    HPTuner Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2011
    Oddometer:
    347
    Location:
    Southeast Ga.
    Neat grabs, Travis! :thumb Looks like you're a fellow feejer!
    #40