County Courthouses of Georgia Thread!

Discussion in 'Southeast, The Lair of the Dragon - The Blue Ridge' started by jub jub, Sep 9, 2013.

  1. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Nice haul today Travis. You don't mess around! Do appreciate the effort. I'll have a couple to add tomorrow when I get home.
    #81
    Ernbo6 likes this.
  2. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Profile
    Incorporated Date: December 10, 1807
    Population: 27,542
    Total Area: 393.8 sq mi

    Jones County, carved from Baldwin County in 1807, recognizes James Jones, a Savannah attorney. At 23, Jones began his service in the state legislature and later attended the state constitutional convention of 1798. Gray, the county seat, is named for a family promi*nent among the region's early settlers.

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    #82
  3. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Morgan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 17,868.The county seat is Madison, Georgia.

    History

    While many believe that Sherman spared the town because it was too beautiful to burn during his March to The Sea, the truth is that Madison was home to pro-Union Senator Joshua Hill. Hill had ties with General Sherman's brother at West Point, so his sparing the town was more political than appreciation of its beauty. Currently, Madison has one of the largest historic districts in the state of Georgia, and tourists from all over the world come to marvel at the antebellum architecture of the homes. Madison is the home of Southern Cross Guest Ranch, the only dude ranch in Georgia.

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    #83
  4. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Hall County is a county located in the US state of Georgia. As of the 2000 census, the population was 139,277. It is included in the Gainesville, Georgia, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also part of the greater Atlanta–Sandy Springs–Gainesville, Georgia-Alabama Combined Statistical Area. Explosive growth is evident, with the census for 2010 census showing a population of 179,684. Gainesville is the county seat and most populous city.

    History

    Hall County was created on December 15, 1818, from Cherokee lands ceded by the Treaty of Cherokee Agency (1817) and Treaty of Washington (1819).
    The county is named for Dr. Lyman Hall, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and governor of Georgia as both colony and state.
    Geography[edit source]

    According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 429.19 square miles (1,111.6 km2), of which 393.66 square miles (1,019.6 km2) (or 91.72%) is land and 35.53 square miles (92.0 km2) (or 8.28%) is covered by water.
    The Chattahoochee River gathers strength in Hall County, as immortalized in Sidney Lanier's poem, "Song of the Chattahoochee":

    OUT of the hills of Habersham,
    Down the valleys of Hall,
    I hurry amain to reach the plain,
    Run the rapid and leap the fall,
    Split at the rock and together again,

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    #84
  5. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Old courthouse.

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    Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 60,485.[1] The county seat is Jefferson.

    History[edit source]

    On February 11, 1796, Jackson County was split off from part of Franklin County, Georgia. The new county was named in honor of Revolutionary War Lieutenant Colonel, Congressman, Senator and Governor James Jackson. The county originally covered an area of approximately 1,800 square miles (4,662.0 km2), with Clarkesboro as its first county seat.
    In 1801, the Georgia General Assembly granted 40,000 acres (160 km2) of land in Jackson County for a state college. Franklin College (now University of Georgia) began classes the same year, and the city of Athens was developed around the school. Also the same year, a new county was developed around the new college town, and Jackson lost territory to the new Clarke. The county seat was moved to an old Indian village called Thomocoggan, a location with ample water supply from Curry Creek and four large springs. In 1804, the city was renamed Jefferson, after Thomas Jefferson.
    Jackson lost more territory in 1811 in the creation of Madison County, in 1818 in the creation of Walton, Gwinnett, and Hall counties, in 1858 in the creation of Banks County, and in 1914 in the creation of Barrow County.
    The first county courthouse, a log and wooden frame building with an attached jail, was built on south side of the public square; a second, larger, two-story brick courthouse with a separate jailhouse was built in 1817. In 1880, a third was built on a hill north of the square. This courthouse was the oldest continuously operating courthouse in the United States until 2004, when the current courthouse was constructed north of Jefferson.

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    New courthouse.
    #85
  6. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Clarke County is a county in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 116,714. Its county seat is Athens, with which it is a consolidated city-county.
    The Athens-Clarke County (balance) is the principal city of and is included in the Athens-Clarke County, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area.
    History[edit source]

    Clarke County was created in 1801 by an act of the Georgia General Assembly on December 5. It was named for Revolutionary War hero Elijah Clarke and included 250 square miles (647.5 km2) that was formerly part of Jackson County. Colonel Clarke played a leading role the 1779 victory at the Battle of Kettle Creek in Wilkes County. The Elijah Clarke Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution erected a monument to him in Broad Street in Athens.
    As the population of the county grew in the early 19th century, its agricultural and cotton industries prospered. The adjacent plantation harvests flowed through city mills. Manufacturing and textile production operations were the major industries in Clarke County, especially after the railroad reached Athens in 1841. Athens and Clarke County were second only to Savannah and Chatham County in the amount of capital invested in manufacturing in the 1840s.
    Two skirmishes were fought in Clarke County in 1864, during the American Civil War, one near Barber's Creek and the other near Mitchell's Road. Athens was occupied by the Union Army on May 29 and a provost-marshal took charge. Formal military occupation of the ended by December 1864, though Union troops remained in the county until early 1866.
    In 1801 the Clarke County Commission had selected Watkinsville (now in Oconee County) as the county seat. All county offices, including the courts and jail, moved to Athens when the seat was moved on November 24, 1871. County meetings took place in the old Athens town hall, until a new courthouse was constructed in 1876. The present courthouse was built in 1914.
    On February 12, 1875, in response to complaints over the relocation of the county seat to Athens, the state legislature created Oconee County from the southwest portion of Clarke County, making Watkinsville its seat. Clarke County thus lost one-third of its population and three-fifths of its land area.
    The position of "commissioner of roads and revenue" was created by the legislature for what are today known as county commissioners. As an extension of the state, the county would conduct welfare and health programs, build and maintain roads, and hold courts of law.
    On March 29, 1973, the Georgia legislature increased the number of county commissioners from 3 to 5, also adding a county administrator.
    In 1990, the residents voted to unify the city and county governments creating Athens-Clarke County, the second (after Columbus-Muscogee County) unified city-county government in the state of Georgia.

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    #86
  7. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    looks like you got a few yourself......

    I enjoyed getting above the fall line. The elevation lines start getting a little closer together up that way! I haven't decided if I'll be north or south of the 33rd parallel this weekend. I think there is a threat of rain starting saturday. Last week's ride included over an hour in heavy rain as I returned to the house after getting the courthouses. I try to keep that sort of thing to a minimum (especially when I can't be bothered to stop and put on the rain gear).

    I've learned more Georgia history in the last few weeks than ever before.
    #87
  8. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    It's a good learning experience, that's for sure.

    It's strange to think it took me all these years to want to learn something about Georgia's history. I use to drive through these towns years ago sitting in my car and I could have cared less about what went on years ago. Somehow, being on the bike has brought about a new appreciation for things other than my immediate surroundings. I can't really explain it, but I like it!

    Travis, let's get together sometime.

    61 down, only 98 left to go! :lol3

    EDIT: Had to add some file photos on a couple. For some reason I was thinking Federal Buildings were the same as county. Duhh. Being on the bike for hours must have dulled the senses. I'll have to make the trip back to Athens and Gainesville so I can capture the real deal, not a mistake I'll make twice.
    #88
  9. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    Let's do that.
    I almost fell into the federal courthouse trap twice myself!

    Crap! I only have 60 marked off on my list....... 30 for me & 30 for the others in the group.

    sent from my droid maxx with tapatalk...
    Travis
    #89
  10. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Georgia County Seats

    Did I dup a county?
    #90
  11. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    I missed marking Gilmer on my list....i am using a hi tech paper map with a highlighter..... i'm sure there is a better way!

    I better get on the move.... the group is one up on me.
    #91
  12. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    I''m going to print out a map and do the same. It's getting to big to go by memory now. Do you think you can grab the other 98 by Saturday? ::lol3
    #92
  13. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    I'll be trying for a few more. Not sure of my route yet.
    #93
  14. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Just so we don't duplicate our efforts, I'm planning on grabbing Bleckly, Laurens, Dodge, Wheeler and Telfair this weekend. :ricky
    #94
  15. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    That's the direction I was planning on heading. I can go farther south. Maybe worth, colquitt, cook, tift, Irwin and ben hill. might add a couple of others!

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    Yellow by me...blue by others.
    #95
  16. jub jub

    jub jub frumiousbandersnatch

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    Travis, you might be able to grab the ones I was going to do. It seems the wife wants to go to the gun range Saturday and shoot off a few rounds. She mentioned something about buying me a hand gun of my choice if I go with her.:D We'll see. I'll give you a definitive answer by Friday. If you get the ones I wanted to get, then I'll probably head down towards Waycross on Sunday (weather permitting) and try to fill in the southeast somewhat.
    #96
  17. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    I've got a 387 mile route planned to the south. Hmmmm a new gun or a ride.... Decisions, decisions.......
    #97
  18. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    Came out to 425 miles miles today. Started off with very heavy ground fog and smelling of recently dug peanuts.


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    Location: Sylvester

    GPS Coordinates: 31.52794, 83.83590

    Date Built: 1905 (substantially rebuilt after 1982 fire)

    Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

    Designer: J.W. Golucke


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    There have been four courthouses since Worth County was created in 1853. The first courthouse was a two-story frame structure on the public square in Isabella, which was then Worth's county seat. This building burned down in 1879, and a schoolhouse was used as a temporary courthouse until a new courthouse could be built in 1893 -- but that structure soon burned also. A new courthouse was constructed the following year, but in 1904 the legislature changed the county seat from Isabella to Sylvester. The next year, a new courthouse was built on Sylvester's public square. In January 1982, the Worth County courthouse suffered major fire damage, requiring substantial rebuilding.

    he legislation creating Worth County named the small settlement of San Bernard [named for Saint Bernard of Clairvaux] as temporary seat of government. The act empowered the justices of the new county's inferior court to pick any site they saw proper for a permanent county seat, and in 1854, tthey chose a site a mile to the east of San Bernard. The new settlement was amed Isabella [named for the wife. of Gen. Worth]. In 1872, a railroad built to connect Albany with Brunswick, missed Isabella by three miles to the south. Though a rail stop known as Isabella Station was built on the railroad, the county seat suffered by not being directly served by the railroad. Soon, other communities sprang up along the railroad in Worth County. By 1893, the small community of Isabella Station was known as Sylvester [the origin of the name refers to forests, though why it was chosen is unknown (though it may have been associated with one of the first settlers of the community)]. On Dec. 21, 1898, Sylvester was incorporated. By the early 1900s, Sylvester residents had launched a move to have their city designated as Worth's county seat. In 1904, a county-wide election was held and the vote favored the move. On July 1, 1904, the General Assembly formally designated Sylvester as the new seat of government for Worth County.
    #98
  19. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    Location: Moultrie

    GPS Coordinates of Courthouse Main Entrance: 31.17940, 83.78851

    Date Built: 1902

    Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

    Designer: Andrew J. Bryan & Co.

    At the time of Colquitt County's creation on February 25, 1856, there were no incorporated towns in the new county. Initially, superior court sessions were held in a large one-story wooden house built by George Tucker on Land Lot 196 in the Eighth Land District (see photo). Known as "Mim's House," the temporary courthouse was located four miles northwest of the small settlement of Ochlockoney. Shortly afterwards, the justices of the new inferior court desginated Ochlockoney as county seat. At some point between 1856 and 1859, the court authorized construction of a "sizeable log building" to serve as Colquitt County's first real courthouse. In 1859, the General Assembly incorporated the settlement at Ochlockoney and named it Moultrie. The legislation designated that the new city consist of the fifty acres surrounding the courthouse. Unfortunately, the log courthouse burned in the spring of 1881, with all land deeds and other county records destroyed. Thereafter, litigation continued for years over land ownership and boundaries in Colquitt County.

    According to a local newspaper account, "Shortly after the fire a one-story, box-like building was erected of unfinished timbers, with the boards running up and down-and covered with strips of lumber to keep out the cold and wind." After a few years, the building was sold to local Methodists for use as a church. The building was removed and in its place a new two-story wooden courthouse constructed. Rectangular in shape, a wing was later added, creating an "L" shaped structure.

    During the 1890s, Colquitt County's population almost tripled due to the rapid growth of timber and naval stores industries. By 1898, county officials were calling for a larger courthouse. They were also fearful of another courthouse fire. So, in 1901, officials decided to build a larger and safer structure. The courthouse was dismantled and sold to a local resident.

    Bids for construction of new two-story brick courthous were opened on April 6, 1901, and the project was awarded to J.H. Harris for his bid of $19,250. Construction of the new courthouse was completed in August 1902, with county officials moving in on September 1.

    In 1938, the federal Work Project Administration proposed modernizing the 1902 courthouse, including adding four more stories (with the top floor to serve as the jail). The WPA would pay 45 percent of the cost, with Colquitt County responsible for the remainder. County commissioners were tempted to accept the offer, but in the end declined because the county was alredy in debt because of the Depression. As a result, the Work Project Administration undertook a less ambitious courthouse restoration in 1940.

    In 1952, county officials had the courthouse's tan brick exterior painted white. Four years later, in conjunction with Colquitt County's centennial, county commissioners authorized a complete remodeling and modernization of the courthouse in 1956-57 at a cost of $285,000. Using convict labor, the interior of the building was stripped to the first floor, and a new second and third floor created--with 12-foot ceilings instead of the former height of 20 feet. The original windows were bricked up, and new smaller windows installed for each floor. Also, some of the distinctive architectural features of the 1902 building were removed.

    In 1994, residents of Colquitt County approved a one cent local option sales tax to renovate the courthouse. In 1998, a major rehabilitation of the courthouse was begun. Completed in March 2001, the $1,889,000 project replaced many of the features of the 1902 courthouse removed in the 1950s – though not restoring the interior to two main floors. Unfortunately, some of the wood used in the 1998-2001 rehabilitation soon began to rot, requiring further rehabilitation in 2005.

    And a very nice eternal flame memorial to the fallen....

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    #99
  20. tsimmons

    tsimmons Been here awhile

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    Location: Thomasville

    GPS Coordinates: 30.83881, 83.98177

    Date Built: 1858, remodeled 1888

    Architectural Style: Greek Revival (1858), Classical/Victorian elements added 1888

    Designer: John Wind (1858), unknown (1888 remodeling)

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    The legislation creating Thomas County provided that superior and inferior courts initially would be held in the house of Charles Kingsley. Reportedly, a log cabin was subsequently built in Thomasville to serve as the county's first courthouse. This simple structure was followed by a larger courthouse, presumably built of wood. The present courthouse -- a three-story brick building -- was originally constructed in 1858. It underwent a major remodeling in 1888, with subsequent renovations in 1909, 1918, 1922, and 1937.