Dalton and Dempster in 2012

Discussion in 'Alaska' started by Bearloe, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2011
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    Hanover, Germany
    Dear ADVriders,

    my cousin and I are newbies to Alaska, but determined to explore the Dalton and Dempster Hwy in summer 2012.

    I have already been lurking for a while and digesting the valuable information offered so freely in this forum. So I'm no longer as ignorant as at the beginning of our planning.

    We have nearly three weeks to take our rental bikes (F 800 GS and F 650 GS single) from Anchorage up to Prudhoe Bay, then back to Fairbanks and on into Canada to ride the Dempster Hwy to Inuvik - and back from there.
    Since we're not on the run, we tend to think that it can be done in about 18 days. Do you agree?

    We think Motoquest (Anchorage) is a good place to rent the two bikes from. Or do you have any other suggestions?

    We are not new to gravel, but we appreciate any hints or recommendations that can help to make our ride a smooth one.

    Also, we are aware of some particulars to bear in mind: i.e. fuel, gear, speed and distances. We carry a tent, and we will have "Milepost" (the 2012 edition) in the tank bag.

    What I'd like your opinions on is bears, mosquitoes and road conditions when wet. The surface tends to become rather slippery, some riders report.

    Furthermore, what about credit cards? Is VISA accepted in Alaska / Canada?
    I suspect that there are no ATMs north of Fairbanks, are there?

    Accomodation is an issue, too. Since we'd like to be flexible, we'd rather not make any reservations in advance. Will that pose a major problem, if we spontaneously long for a room with a shower? BTW, cabins would be nice, too.

    Lots of questions - appreciating your advice

    Bearloe
    #1
  2. Solarmoose

    Solarmoose electric

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    1. Can your trip be done in 18 days? Haven't done the Dalton or the Dempster, others need to comment. I would guess you can.

    2. Is Motoquest a good place to rent? Haven't heard any negatives, others need to comment.

    3. Riding gravel. Over-driving the conditions and/or skill level is the most common mistake. Keep the speed down. Drive your sight distance. The usual stuff.

    4. Opinions on is bears, mosquitoes and wet road conditions.
    You won't see bears very often. They don't want to be seen. Take the usual precautions of keeping your food away from sleeping areas.

    Mosquitoes are a fact of life. Some summers they are terrible, some not. Carry and use bug repellent. I like to camp in a breezy area to keep the bugs away.
    I once rode into a cloud of skeets so thick; how thick was it? Well they was going the same direction I was and so I matched my speed to the mosquito cloud and greatly increased my gas mileage! All true. :rofl

    Just take it easy on wet slick surfaces. Not all roads are slick when wet. Some say we already have too many paved roads.

    5. Visa or most any plastic works anywhere in AK and Canada. ATMs are everywhere too. I always carry a bit of cash in case the machines aren't working.

    6. Reservations needed? Some places yes. Others need to comment here.

    Have a good trip.
    #2
  3. HayDuchessLives

    HayDuchessLives Loquita

    Joined:
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    Welcome to Alaska! Hopefully you will thoroughly enjoy your rides up the Dalton and Dempster Highways. I sure did! Riding through stunning, remote wilderness is an incredible experience. Eighteen days allows plenty of time to get up to both Prudhoe Bay and Inuvik and back to Anchorage and should also provide time to visit other places, like McCarthy and Manley Hot Springs and/or riding across the Denali Highway. Two summers ago I rode up both of these highways and we made it to both Deadhorse and Inuvik in three days from Anchorage (one way, not RT). <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    If you end up in a time crunch, you can ride between Deadhorse and Fairbanks in one day, but it’s nice to take a little extra time to camp and do some hiking and take photos. Or spend an extra day riding on the Elliot Highway, a FUN dirt road, over to Manley Hot Springs, where you can soak and relax. There are campgrounds located on the Dalton Hwy and lots of riders stay at the University of Alaska Fairbanks dorm rooms. (Fairbanks is about 350 miles from Anchorage.) The university’s rate is a lot cheaper than the hotels and even come with a towel and soap! Last year I was told there is a special parking place reserved for DRs, but disappointingly that turned out to be right by the dumpster. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    There are also campgrounds and some overnight accommodations on the Dempster and the wonderful Canadian government provides campfire wood in their campgrounds! (I wish Alaska would do that.) On our way back down the Dempster Highway I left my friends and stayed at the Tombstone Mountain Campground for a few extra days to do some hiking. The beautiful Tombstone Mountains are nicknamed the “Patagonias of North America!” Again, if you’re in a time crunch, you can ride from Dawson to Anchorage in one day (approximately 500 miles), and the Dempster Highway is about 25 miles from Dawson. Keep in mind the border crossing isn’t open 24 hours. If you have time on your way back to Anchorage, you should ride out to the historic town of McCarthy. The dirt highway you ride on to get there is south of Glennallen (home of the infamous Gregarious Glennallen Geezer who loves fudge). <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Overall I’ve heard good things about MotoQuest. VISA is accepted in Alaska/Canada but I’m not sure about ATMs north of Fairbanks; there probably aren’t any. You’ll need good raingear!!! Mosquito headwear is highly recommended as those pesky little buggers develop huge swarms in the summer and are very annoying and determined to make your life as miserable as possible when you stop. If you take proper precautions, bears generally aren’t a problem, unless you visit Kodiak Island. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    You’ll probably have to carry extra fuel on both highways. The longest distance between gas stations on the Dalton is about 240 miles (between Coldfoot and Deadhorse) and the longest distance between gas stations on the Dempster is approximately 220 to 240 miles. It’s a good idea to carry extra fuel in case you run into problems, like deep mud, that might cause you to turn around. I think most of the overnight accommodations on both highways are pretty busy in the summer, so reservations are recommended. Inuvik is a bustling metropolis compared to Deadhorse, so finding a room there or in Dawson probably wouldn’t be a hassle. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    As for road conditions on these highways, it appears that these highways are maintained a little differently (calcium chloride on the Dalton and lots of deep gravel on the Dempster), but both can become treacherous, slippery and super-duper scary (to me) when they’re wet and covered with deep mud and/or gravel or slick-as-snot calcium chloride. Just slow down and ride within your comfort zone and focus focus focus. And after you safely get through the slippery scary stuff – let out a loud yell of relief like I do! <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    When Super Crumpet and I (along with ADV-RX?) rode up the Dumpster, our firm goal was to ride all the way to Inuvik and back, safely, while HAVING FUN. Before we even left Anchorage we discussed the horror stories we had heard about the Dumpster and both agreed that if the muddy road conditions became deep and scary (i.e. not fun), we would stop, pitch our tents, and wait a day or two until conditions improved. We allowed a couple extra days for bad weather and luckily had a good weather window MOST of the trip. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Have fun planning and executing your awesome Alaskan ADVenture! :clap<o:p></o:p>
    #3
  4. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Hi Solarmoose,
    Good advice. We are on vacation, there's no need to rush, and we DO want to enjoy the ride - and nature.

    Hanging up our food into the trees does not always seem the best idea. Can't grizzlies climb trees? Well, we know that the panniers are not the right place to leave food in, either.

    Good advice, we'll try to do so.

    We'll mind this piece of advice, Solarmoose.

    Yes, a sound balance of plastic and cash seems to be a good idea.

    We don't mind sleeping in our tent, but I don't think there is a campground in Prudhoe Bay, so we better call them and make reservations in advance.

    Thnaks for you valuable advice, Solarmoose.

    Take care

    Bearloe
    #4
  5. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Hi HayDuchessLives,

    now I can rest assured that 18 days will give us plenty of time to explore the Dalton / Dempster Hwys and maybe see some more beautiful spots of Alaska. Thanks for the valuabel suggestions. As a matter of fact, we do want to visit McKinley NP, and we may ride the Denali Hwy up to Fairbanks then. It's always good to know your options.

    Actually, I'd rather take my time and enjoy the ride and the beautiful Alaskan lanscape.

    That's a good idea, and I think we may seriously consider doing that.

    Thanks for mentioning the Fairbanks University dorms, we have heard about them before, and since we pass through Fairbanks, we better book a room there.
    A special ADVriders parking zone sounds like a great idea :clap.

    We would like to spend a day or two in the McKinley NP, but we may squeeze the Tombstone Mountains in anyway.

    Good advice, we should find out before we leave. I'm sure Motoquest, the company we may rent our bikes from, know such travel details.

    OK, here you've got me. I have to do some research on this (in)famous Glennallen Geezer to find out how to appease him - maybe fudge can help?
    <o:p></o:p>
    From what I've heard so far MotoQuest is a good choice. And we plan to rely on plastic and cash to be on the safe side.

    We will take good raingear!!! And I have made a mental note to drop into Alaska Leather and buy a hat with a mosquito net - plus Deet (or something similar) to avoid being eaten up by these nasty little bloodsuckers.

    <o:p></o:p>
    No, Kodiak is not on our agenda :D.

    We will pick up jerry cans on the way out to carry extra fuel on both highways.

    Thanks for your advice about calcium-chloride or deep gravel - we will adjust our speed accordingly. There is no sense in taking unnecessary risks.
    <o:p></o:p>
    Promised !
    <o:p></o:p>


    Again, this is a very good piece of advice.

    One final question, please. Do campgrounds have some kinds of "restaurants" or something like that where we can get a meal?

    Thanks for your helpful suggestions, HayDuchessLives

    Bearloe

    PS: I'll read your Denali ride report tonight.
    #5
  6. HayDuchessLives

    HayDuchessLives Loquita

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    Hi Bearloe,
    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    I'm sharing links to three ride reports you might enjoy reading. Two RRs are on the Dalton Highway and one RR is a trip to McCarthy. AlcanRider, AKA the infamous Gregarious Glennallen Geezer, writes excellent reports and includes gorgeous photos. He's a veritable font of information as he's been riding up here since, well, I think he's been up here since before Alaska was even a state. He's probably lived here even before the mastodons became extinct. <?xml:namespace prefix = v ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" /><v:shapetype id=_x0000_t75 stroked="f" filled="f" path="m@4@5l@4@11@9@11@9@5xe" o:preferrelative="t" o:spt="75" coordsize="21600,21600"><v:stroke joinstyle="miter"></v:stroke><v:formulas><v:f eqn="if lineDrawn pixelLineWidth 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 1 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum 0 0 @1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @2 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 0 1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @6 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @8 21600 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @10 21600 0"></v:f></v:formulas><v:path o:connecttype="rect" gradientshapeok="t" o:extrusionok="f"></v:path><o:lock aspectratio="t" v:ext="edit"></o:lock></v:shapetype><v:shape style="WIDTH: 12.75pt; HEIGHT: 13.5pt; VISIBILITY: visible; mso-wrap-style: square" id=Picture_x0020_2 alt="Description: 0" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1026"><v:imagedata o:title="0" src="file:///C:\Users\Amy\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image001.gif"></v:imagedata></v:shape>:lol3
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=694867<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585362<o:p></o:p>
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    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=709934<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Campgrounds usually don't have cafes, but there are cafes/restaurants in towns along your route(s). Of course things are very remote and sparse the last 150 or so miles of the Dumpster and 240 miles of the Dalton Hwy, so bring snacks and water.
    <o:p></o:p>
    The special parking for DRs (right by the dumpster) at the university in Fairbanks is a joke, and only pertains to MY bike as a couple of the Geezers have called my lovely DR a Dumpster Reject.
    <o:p></o:p>
    Enjoy the ride reports! <v:shape style="WIDTH: 11.25pt; HEIGHT: 11.25pt; VISIBILITY: visible; mso-wrap-style: square" id=Picture_x0020_1 alt="Description: 0" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1025"><v:imagedata o:title="0" src="file:///C:\Users\Amy\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image002.gif"></v:imagedata></v:shape>:D<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    #6
  7. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

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    Hi HayDuchessLives,
    thanks for these links, great reading and very nice pics - highly informative and enjoyable!
    Yeah, we better store some sandwiches and water then :D.
    :rofl Great, I love it.

    Bearloe
    #7
  8. paddlinfool

    paddlinfool 3rd midlife crisis

    Joined:
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    Sidney BC
    Hey Bearloe
    Lots of great tips from folks... Here's a couple more. Stay in Fairbanks if you can and catch a 3 day weather window. I legged it out of there into rain and fog all the way to Deadhorse, missed all the beautiful scenery... I only made it one way... :muutt I'm goin back!!! The Arctic Caribou inn has some great folks working there, in fact, all the denizens of Deadhorse are awesome people. Be sure and bring cash though, its the easiest. ATMS are scarce. Make sure and book ahead with the folks at the AC Inn if you intend to go to the ocean. You'll need to provide good ID bcos you'll be going thru checkpoints in Prudhoe Bay and the oilfields to get to the ocean. You can only get there by shuttle bus.($45) As I said, book ahead, as the buses fill up pretty quick, especially if theres a Greyhound or two there. If you can find a dry spell, so much the better, the road is not what i'd call difficult, just a bitch if it's raining. (the potholes all look the same) Above all else? WATCH OUT FOR THE DAMN ROAD GRADERS! They aren't very helpful... check out the link here http://www.spotadventures.com/trip/view?trip_id=273406 Seriously, go slow and enjoy!
    Paddlinfool
    #8
  9. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Hi paddlinfool,

    This sounds like a very good advice, and we'll take it for sure. No use riding up to Prudhoe Bay in the fog/rain and not see anything of Alaska's beautiful nature except gravel.

    I'm sorry to hear that, but I hope the rider was OK.

    Thanks for the recommendation, it's the Arctic Caribou Inn then, and we'll make sure to book in advance. The same goes for the ride to the ocean, which we definitely want to be on. IDs should not be the problem, since we Europeans need a valid passport to enter Alaska in the first place :D.
    Yeah, and we will carry cash! I checked the ATM page recently and found out that there don't seem to be any north of Fairbanks.

    Paddlinfool, I get your point, and the photos of this accident (plus the injuries) should make every rider respect the Dalton, I guess.

    BTW, no rental company seems to allow riding the Dempster Hwy anymore. Apparently, too many accidents happen, but we can at least ride to Dawson City and then down to Skagway. So one part of the Yukon is still open to us :D.

    Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you and all ADVriders

    Mike
    #9
  10. HayDuchessLives

    HayDuchessLives Loquita

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    We have been remiss and haven't give you the best advice yet, which is to NOT ride the Dalton Highway in the winter. (I know - DUH....:D) Some folks have done it, and one geezerly rider I know is seriously planning it someday, but most riders wait until at least the end of May so (most of) the snow melts on the highway.

    I missed the annual April Fool's Day ride to the Arctic Circle, but in mid April some friends and I backcountry skied into the Tolovana Hot Springs outside of Fairbanks, located off of the Elliot Highway, which is accessed at a junction with the Dalton Highway. Since AlcanRider and I were planning another Memorial Day weekend ride up the Dalton, I offered to scout out road conditions while I was in the area. When I stepped off of the snow berm I immediately sunk into the snow up past my crotch :eek1 and my friends laughed at me and weren't about to come over and help me extricate myself from the heavy snow.


    [​IMG]

    I don't think I would have gotten very far on my skis, breaking trail through that deep snow. Happy trip planning!
    #10
  11. AK Bob

    AK Bob AKAM

    Joined:
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    Fairbanks, AK
    Nein, no Nuts!

    Griz don't climb trees, worry more about Black Bears. The Last tree is South of Attigun Pass, North of there your "Above Tree Line". The Hawk (AK Weather - YT Too) don't take any pitty on thoes that don't RESPECT the country, and it dosn't feel your pain.

    The thing to keep in mind you are going to be a LONG way from help, even if you can call for help, and they can drop everything else they are doing and come to Your Aid.. They also don't have to come.

    The closest MAST helicopter to the dalton is in Fairbanks, 2 hrs + (Flying Time One Way) depending on where you are. It is real easy to bleed out in that amount of time. The closest OR is also in Fairbanks.

    Can your preposed trip be done in that Time? Yes IF.. The weather, road, or Valkurie don't want to get you.

    If you stay within your abilities and the weather cooperates you will have a trip that you will love and remember the rest of your lives. The Dalton is that nice or, I should say can be.

    When are you planing to come? The Airheads would like to be of assistance.

    Dust to Dawson (D2D) June 21-24.
    #11
  12. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

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    Hi HayDuchessLives,

    Don't you worry - we'll come over in late July. And should Alaska be covered in snow then, as seen on your impressive picture, we'd exchange the motorcycles for snowmobiles :D.

    Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

    Bearloe
    #12
  13. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

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    Hi AK Bob,

    well, I think it's wise to take precautions, but I postpone panicking until a bear attempts to hug me.

    I believe that's a good piece of advice. I don't have to prove anything to anybody, I'm out there to enjoy Alaska and the ride, so I don't wish to take unnecessary risks. As you said, "stay within your abilities".

    Yeah, it might be good idea to be prepared for a situation like that (that may mean being a bit generous on my water and food supply).

    I'm delighted to hear that, Bob.
    We fly into Anchorage on July 22, and then we have about 3 weeks. Since the rental companies no longer allow riding the Dempster Hwy, we should have time enough to enjoy our trip.

    Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

    Bearloe
    #13
  14. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

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    Hey paddlinfool,

    This question may be silly, but ...
    Are credit cards accepted north of Fairbanks?

    Happy New Year :clap.

    Bearloe
    #14
  15. david white

    david white Wanderer

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    To answer a couple of your questions. Weather is going to determine what you can and can't do mileage wise on these two roads. I rode the Dempster and Dalton last year in early July. I had what i would consider perfect weather minus some bouts of rain around eagle plains on the dempster and on my return from prudhoe bay, i had some drizzle towards the end of the dalton around the hot spot cafe. What i found is...if the road is redish brown or light brown/clayish in color, it is extremely slippery on two wheels, and you will go down if it catches you off guard or by surprise. If the dirt is greyish/black in color it is nowhere near as slippery as the aforementioned and you can make decent time on it if that is important. Also when the road crews are working the road(wetting and rolling in calcium chloride) it is extremely slippery regardless of color.
    I used a visa/cc most of the time but made sure i had cash on hand for the odd situation. They will take a cc at the yukon river crossing and of course in prudhoe bay, inuvik and eagle plains. I'm guess there are ATMS up there, but your credit card will take you almost anywhere up in those parts. Make sure you have canadian cash or use your credit card, some places(gasstations/convenience store) type places will beat you up on the exchange rate.
    I made reservations in prudhoe bay, and inuvik. If i were 2 daying it to inuvik and prudhoe i would reserve something in wiseman/coldfoot and at eagle plains on the dempster unless of course your camping. I found a lot of Mom and Pop type places to stay for $50 to $60 a night with no advanced reservations. I thought they were a great deal after 12 hr days in the saddle.
    The only grizzly/brown bear i saw was on my return trip in yellowstone in mt, but did see many a black bear on the cassiar hwy in british columbia and a few in the hyder alaska area. The milepost helps to a certain extent but the road conditions change by the hour and what is in the milepost is good for simple generalizations. I cut out pages of maps of the roads i'd be riding in the milepost and brought them with me. They packed small and were a good reference source.
    I might have missed some of your questions, anything else you can pm me.
    #15
  16. HayDuchessLives

    HayDuchessLives Loquita

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    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>
    Here’s a serious response to your possibly silly question. Of course credit cards are accepted in most establishments north of Fairbanks, but only if you pass stringent, pre-trip test-qualifications and earn the endorsement of various infamous Alaskan inmates, including the Gregarious Glennallen Geezer (AlcanRider), Solarmoose of Fairbanks, Maggie, and the defective (former Alaskan) AKBeemer. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    You should first test the acceptability of your credit card in Anchorage, by meeting some of the local inmates and purchasing lots of dinners and libations and expensive farkles. Supporting the local economy does wonders to establish good rapport and test how well the credit card works in an urban Alaskan location. If it doesn’t work in Anchorage, it won’t work in rural areas like Coldfoot! <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    The next best way to establish your Alaskan credentials is to meet our Magnificent Maggie and show her to a good time. :wink: If you treat her well and give her a ride she’ll never forget, you’ll earn her undying support and if your credit card isn’t accepted somewhere, well… she’ll amply take care of things for you. She splits her time between her beaus in Montana and Glennallen, so while it’s very easy to spot her mind-boggling, unforgettable figure from a distance, finding her location might be difficult. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Before you start your ride up the Dalton Highway, it’s probably a good idea to test the acceptability of your credit card up in Fairbanks, so, shucky darn, you should meet with some local inmates up there and purchase more libations. That’s where Solarmoose can be helpful. :deal He knows inmates up there who might possibly want to volunteer some time to help a cheechako sample good ales and put his credit card to the grueling but important qualifying test of “will it be accepted north of Anchorage??” After earning their hopefully generous endorsements, you should have few credit card concerns while you head off into the remote wilderness of the Dalton Highway. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    I think you’ll discover that Alaskans are very hospitable and helpful to visiting riders, going out of their way to offer advice, encouragement, and (only for certain outstanding visitors) assistance in testing other rider’s credit card purchasing abilities. :D<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    I haven’t thought of an appropriate way for you to gain the endorsement of AlcanRider or AKBeemer yet, so I think I’ll have a cup of tea to stimulate my creativity.

    :rofl

    Happy New Year to you too! For those of us with no studs :cry , it's only (hopefully) four months until riding season!!!

    <o:p></o:p>
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    #16
  17. Too Tall

    Too Tall Been here awhile

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    Just a quick heads-up on our experience using credit cards on our trip north to Alaska in 2010.

    Many gas station's card readers are nonfunctional and correctly require holding a credit card or cash to make sure you are not a drive off after fueling. We were using our CC for gas purchases but received a call from Mastercard questioning several of our recent "over-seas" (Great Britain) purchases. We had let them know earlier we would be traveling thru Canada and Alaska from the midwest for a month.

    At the CC company's suggestion, we stopped using a CC to hold for gas purchases. We used cash and then switched to CC when paying inside. At one transation, an attendant wanted to run our card thru an imprinter but we quickly switched over to a cash purchase. No more problems after that.

    Really did enjoy everyone we met on our trip north but be careful during money transactions.
    #17
  18. HayDuchessLives

    HayDuchessLives Loquita

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    For some reason AlcanRider asked me if I was feeling "ornery" when I posted the response to Bearloe about using his credit card. I told him he must be confused as I wasn't being ornery. I was just trying to be helpful. :nod

    If I was being ornery, I would have posted something silly like this:

    [​IMG]

    I found out where the two Handsome, Intelligent, Charming, Debonair, Modest and Humble Geezers go when they're on vacation. Unlike up here, they obviously get treated with respect in Geezerville as they have specially-marked street crossing areas.

    So - I wasn't being ornery earlier - I was just joshing with the Cheechako; something I enjoy doing. :D

    (P.S. I stole the original graphic from the Rocky Mountain Forum, under Demotivational Posters. I wanted to give some credit where it's due.)
    #18
  19. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2011
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Hanover, Germany
    Hello HayDuchessLives,

    plus HayDutchesLives, of course :D.

    <o:p>I do like your humorous way of replying to my somewhat silly question.
    But if I followed your excellent advice, I would have to party my way up to Fairbanks getting to know probably all ADVRiders north of Wyoming - I and would never reach Prudhoe Bay, I'm afraid :rofl.

    Don't get me wrong - I do like to meet nice and helpful people like you and many others to personally thank you for all the great advice given me.

    Happy New Year
    </o:p>
    #19
  20. Bearloe

    Bearloe Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2011
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Hanover, Germany
    Hi Too Tall,

    thanks for your helpful CC advice.
    We sometimes have this card reader problem in Europe, too, but rarely. However, it's probably best to make sure that I'll have enough cash on me to pay for gas, at least.

    Thanks again and Happy New Year

    Bearloe
    #20