Damaged Sheetrock painting question

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by henrymartin, Jun 26, 2012.

  1. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

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    Boys and girls who like to play with paint and sheetrock, please help...

    The Mrs hinted (about 30 times) her desire to redo our bathroom. Being a good listener (yeah right) I jumped right on it, ripped the ceramic tile floor, and yadi, yadi, yada...

    Anyway, there were some things attached to the walls with a combo of fasteners and adhesive. Said adhesive did such a good job at sticking, that it ripped some of the sheetrock paper off :eek1

    Not completely to the gypsum board, but the brown paper is exposed. I went around with a razor blade, cut little shapes out around the damaged areas, removed all loose, peeling stuff. Stuck with the brown paper for now. Okay, two local hardware stores told me to mud the brown paper with a skim coat, sand, skim again, sand, and prime. I was going to prime, then skimcoat, then prime again but for some reason I listened to those guys. So, with a thin, thin coat of joint compound, there are places where the brown paper likes to suck in the moisture and bubble up. Hooray! No, not really.

    So, how do I deal with this situation, where there are a few small spots, and a couple of big spots (like 2x2ft) of brown paper? cutting and replacing the sheetrock is not an option at this point. Thanks
    #1
  2. D.T.

    D.T. Difficult but useful

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    BTDT.

    I'd keep cutting back the paper until the B.S. stops. Keep on keepin' on with the joint compound. Thicker and thicker if needed.
    #2
  3. anonny

    anonny What could go wrong?

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    When sanding between the coats.... just knock the lumps off... make sure you dont sand into the paper or just find a good drywaller.
    #3
  4. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    Cut back the bubbles, seal with an oil based primer, coat with hot mud, then all purpose or topping compound.
    #4
  5. roger123

    roger123 Long timer

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    Sorry to hear about the bubbles, I had the exact same problem and the only thing I could do to get the bubbling to stop was rip out and install new drywall, good luck!
    #5
  6. mcma111

    mcma111 Long timer

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    I always use oil based primer on new or repaired sheet rock. Need texture? Paint effected area with a thick coat and then stab the brush around and you have texture.
    #6
  7. squiffynimrod

    squiffynimrod maximum shrinkage

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    The brown paper is a form of kraft paper, it's normally laminated to the face paper which is a much higher quality paper. The quality of the kraft paper has been decreasing as the amount of recycled paper vs. virgin paper has increased.

    The kraft paper is highly absorptive compared to the face paper. Drywall mud can contain lots of water depending on which brand/ product. High moisture content + absorptive paper = bubbles. Better off to cut right through to the gypsum core. The fact that you were given wrong information doesn't surprise me.

    Normally, unpainted drywall is not sealed with oil based products. The extended dry time will cause the "hair" in the face paper to raise up causing a rough surface. It's usually water based sealers for a really fast dry time.

    Your case is different. You could oil prime the kraft paper to seal it off, because you're going to bury it in mud. This will work, but you've got a longer dry time to deal with. A good alternative would be a pigmented shellac (Zinnser BIN or similar).
    Alcohol based, dries quick. May take a couple of coats as the paper's going to be sucking it in.
    #7
  8. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

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    Funny you should mention that. I hit the trouble spots with the BIN just before I read this. Now it's time for more mud :deal
    #8
  9. ericrat

    ericrat Long timer

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    I have switched to the dry powdered mix type of compound for around the house repairs. It is SO MUCH BETTER. I suspect this is what the poster above was refering to as "hot mud". For a problem area like that, you can reduce the amount of water in the mix (the chart in on the bag) and use warm water. Mixed like that it will set up in minutes with very little water available to soak up into the substrate.

    Eric
    #9
  10. LexLeroy

    LexLeroy Chief Mansplainer

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    +1 on the setting vs. the drying type of joint compound. The drying types have always shrunk and bubbled for me - then I discovered Durabond 90. Low shrink rate, stickier than a booger on your finger - just be sure to get it where you want it and then clean your tools off quickly. After it sets it's an absolute bitch to sand or scrape down. Once it's set apply your topping compound, prime w/ Kilz and you should be golden.
    #10
  11. Wired

    Wired Been here awhile

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    Personally, if this was a bedroom you would probably be fine. With it being a bathroom I would cut the area between the studs, replace with the proper green board, tape, mud, primer, and paint. Do it right the first time and be done. You've already messed with this for a bit. Even if it does work for now, it's probably not as good as starting over and doing it right. In 2, 4, or 6 years down the road you might have to mess with this again to save time now. How long are you planning on staying in this house? If it's awhile, do it right.
    #11
  12. ragtoplvr

    ragtoplvr Long timer

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    +1 for the green board, you can be finished in less time than messing with salvaging the white board, and have real actual water resistance.

    Rod
    #12
  13. gplane

    gplane Putty Conjugator

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    Pigmented shellac on exposed paper-hot mud-topping-sand-prime-paint.
    #13
  14. frogy

    frogy Been here awhile

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    +1 here.I do maint. at Assisted Living facility (read lots of wall damage with walkers),the fast setting powder is a dream if you work fast,if you dont,yell you gots a lotta chippin ta do.
    #14
  15. squiffynimrod

    squiffynimrod maximum shrinkage

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    Ding! Ding! Ding!
    #15
  16. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

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    It's almost done, just two coats of mud and some BIN in places where things went wrong. After the first sanding I primed the trouble spots, then mudded again spreading it out to feather it later. I was going to sand tonight but it is not fully dry yet in spots.

    No greenboard at this time. Actually none of the damaged places have any possibility of water contact short of a wild teenage party, and my kids are too small for that:deal

    Thanks for all the replies. I guess I won't know how things turned out until I prime the whole wall.
    #16