Dead battery in the middle of nowhere

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by b3nji, Nov 14, 2012.

  1. b3nji

    b3nji n00b

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    So I got all geared up for a ride this morning and my bike wouldn't start. Luckily enough, I was was able to bump start it going downhill on my street. My question is this: What if you're camping in the middle of nowhere (miles to nearest paved road) and can't bump start your motorcycle? Are there portable jump starters out there that are decently sized (small) that can be carried on a road trip?

    Thanks!
    #1
  2. Offcamber

    Offcamber Long timer

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    What about a small solar panel to charge the dead battery?? Won't do any good if the battery won't take a charge but an added benefit is it could be used to charge small electronics like phone while your camping.

    Something like this... Solar Charger
    #2
  3. Nytelyte

    Nytelyte Somewhere about

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    I've not had a bike that I wasn't able to bump start on a flat road. Lots of running, lubricate the starter with lots of swearing, and it'll go. Sometimes takes more than one try.
    But I'm a reasonably fit younger dude, & the biggest bike I've dealt with in this manner is a I4 600cc. Not sure if its harder with some of the high comp. singles, or if you have something that is very cold blooded to start with. I'll have to ponder this.
    #3
  4. JohnBoy777

    JohnBoy777 Pseudo-Adventurist

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    Those are really maintainers, more than chargers - you'd need a panel 3' X 4' to charge it. i imagine they'll charge it if you have a full day or two in the sun.
    #4
  5. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Easy...kick start it!

    :hide


    Yeah, I've done my share of push starting. On gravel with knobbies, I'll shift straight to 2nd gear, to give the wheel a bit more leverage on the motor, then drop all my weight on the rear tire as I let out the clutch.

    It can be pretty tough on a 400-600 lb bike with dual sport tires. I haven't had to do it on the 410 lb Dorsoduro yet (the Aprilias are known to have occasional starter relay trouble), but my plan would be to use the same technique but shift straight to 3rd gear. The bike also has drive-by-wire throttle, fuel injection, and electric fuel pump. I'm not sure how it will work in the event of a dead battery. I have the feeling I would be screwed...

    That's why I think all bikes should have back-up kick starters, but nobody listens to me...
    #5
  6. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    If you have two bikes, tire to tire on the center stands...
    #6
  7. yatman

    yatman Been here awhile

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    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=832207

    Great question having no juice to start your bike out in the "bush" and no big hill (that you're on the top of) to jump start
    and gravel is hard enough to bump a loaded bike. I came close to that situation once and it really rattled my confidence.
    I included a dual battery thread link....this is something that should be considered I feel....each of us has his own fears or demons though....being where I am it's pretty easy to get out of cell and/or radio range and a small "power pack" or a kick start option would be nice to have.
    Great question
    Be Safe and happy riding

    yatman
    #7
  8. ABHooligan

    ABHooligan The Flying Mythos

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    I've had to push a couple of bikes a little ways to roll them off down a hill. I can push my KLR or Tiger up a small hill to get this done. I'd hate to do it with a GS though. When I've had a low battery I unplugged the headlight to give it a bit of extra juice to the starter. I wouldn't rank this as one of my bigger worries.
    #8
  9. hhkiwi

    hhkiwi Been here awhile

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    What's the deal with push starting a fuel injected bike? I heard that when the battery is completely drained, you could be out of luck.
    #9
  10. Renegade_Azzy

    Renegade_Azzy Kamen Rider

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    Just takes a hair longer. Ive bumped the vstrom plenty of times, because I tend to forget the key when going into work. :D

    It takes a few more revs, some to get juice going to the fuel pumo, and then enough for spark. Would thate to do it on the flat... not enough room for me to run and jump on the thing with the bags and all (but they could come off).
    #10
  11. Wargasm

    Wargasm Been here awhile

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    I once had to push my GS1100 up hill to get a good run to bump start it. I think I could scare the CRF250L into starting if I farted. EFI or carbed they can all be bumped, EFI just needs more of a run/roll.
    #11
  12. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    I think proper preventive maintenance is in order here, don't go out into the middle of nowhere if your stuff isn't up to snuff. sure, sometimes a battery will just give up the ghost, but for the most part, they are pretty reliable, when in doubt, put a new one in.
    #12
  13. mrpete64

    mrpete64 Been here awhile

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    Most batterys are shot after three years. I put a date on mine so that I can remember when I purchased the battery. Better buy a new battery once-in-a-while than be stuck in the middle of nowhere.
    #13
  14. mark1150

    mark1150 Been here awhile

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    Good advise,however I still tend to be reliant on my optimate doing it's thing.
    It's supposed to flash different sequences if there is something wrong, and I hope that I pick up on the problem if there is one.
    One thing if you really are stuck in booniesville and have to push it out to a road or civilization,it's a lot easier to push if you drop the chain off of the rear sprocket, zip ty the chain to the swing arm and you have total free wheel.
    A few minuets job to save a bit of grief.
    #14
  15. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    Never heard of this one. I like this kind of party.
    #15
  16. worwig

    worwig Long timer

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    Solar would be a cruel joke in this situation. You would need about a 2 foot by 2 foot panel, or more, and a couple of hours of perfect sunlight. Something along the lines of 50 watts.

    I put one of those 1 watt units like you show on a shed in the back yard to keep a lawn tractor battery maintained. It would maintain it over the winter, but wouldn't charge it if the battery was dead because I hadn't plugged it in for a while.
    #16
  17. worwig

    worwig Long timer

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    One bike I ride daily to work. 2004. Original battery.
    Another bike in the garage has a battery from 2000 in it.
    I don't plan to replace them until they show signs of problems.

    I have had almost new batteries fail suddenly on bikes. I don't plan on risking having my old bikes being stranded by a new crappy battery.

    BTW, I occasionally plug them into a cheap desulfater charger from Northern Tools, if that matters.
    #17
  18. hhkiwi

    hhkiwi Been here awhile

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    +1 on that one. I purchased a brand new Harley battery at my local dealer back in May and within less than six months one or more of the cells died.

    The good news is that I got it replaced free of charge so it was worth spending a few extra $$ in my case.

    On another note, do any of you have experience with one of the new light weight lithium batteries? I wonder how they stack up/last and if they're worth the extra $$.
    #18
  19. PFFOG

    PFFOG Richard Alps-aholic

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    SPOT!!!!

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    #19
  20. Snarky

    Snarky Vodka Infused.

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    I just bought one of those, despite the bad reviews of their customer service. I figure at the very least it's another tool in the chest to try to avoid what happened in my face plant thread. Hopefully it'll work when I need it. If you go this route, make sure you bring extra batteries.

    [​IMG]

    Also, you might consider carrying an extra battery with you. I have a Lithium Iron battery in my bike, it wouldn't take up a lot of weight or size to carry a second, and they are quick connect/disconnect. Mine has me slightly paranoid, it's a bit hard starting in the cold, but I heard once it warms up from a heavy draw it's fine.

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    #20