Dealing with dealers.....

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by outdoornate65, Nov 19, 2012.

  1. wb57

    wb57 Long timer

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    Based on what I've read here, I would as well.
  2. wb57

    wb57 Long timer

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    I did. I was in there at least weekly for years. Communicated face-to-face, email, phone, FB PMs, etc. Not going to whine about it here (any more than I may have already) and I realize that the whole situation isn't likely to translate well to pixels.
  3. wb57

    wb57 Long timer

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    End of model year 2011 Kawasaki Versys. Bought it for $6350 OTD. Original dealer wouldn't take less than $7350 OTD. Both dealers within 40-50 miles of me.

    And I've picked up bikes from other dealers for this dealer that he didn't have in stock and know that they don't make much on a bike sale when carrying the paperwork back to him. If I had done nothing but screw around shopping bikes over the years, this would have made more sense. Most of the money I spent in there was parts, gear, tires, etc. Typically higher markup stuff. He made plenty of money on me over the years - and he should have. That's how business works. I don't begrudge him that one iota.
  4. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    So very true. It is hard to clearly convey the whole picture in short posts. That is likely why you misinterpreted what I was trying to say. It's all good.

    I am glad you found a bike at a price you were willing to pay. May it bring you MANY MANY miles of smiles. :beer
  5. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    AGREE! The store and or its employees should be there after the sale to serve their customers.

    I have had stores stay open late for me so I could pick up a part. Or volunteer to come and pick up my bike when it wouldn't start.
    Even toss me the keys to another bike and say "see you in a couple days"
    when I dropped a bike off for tires. (I had arranged for a ride)

    It is things like that that make a loyal customer and it is what I try to emulate. You are there for the customers. The customers are there for you... Be there for THEM. It should be like an infinity circle.

    :ricky

    Edit: There are times when people (for any number of reasons) get "Burn Out" ... They lose the passion that they once had. The dealership becomes a "JOB" and it is no longer the happy place it once was. It is sad to watch happen. It goes from "I GET TO" to "I have to". Not saying this is what happened to the old store for you wb57 but it sounds like it might be the case.
  6. LowInSlo

    LowInSlo Been here awhile

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    :clap

    Exactly. We run a small retail store, and we stress this all the time. Do the right thing, engage. We love the terminology of Disney, they're Guests, not customers. Good philosophy Dakez.
  7. LowInSlo

    LowInSlo Been here awhile

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    :clap

    Exactly. We run a small retail store, and we stress this all the time. Do the right thing, engage. We love the terminology of Disney, they're Guests, not customers. Good philosophy Dakez. You and the boss get an "Atta Boy"
  8. Josephvman

    Josephvman I'm the Decider

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    Sorry for the novel. I forgot that something like that would take at least a couple of hours for the average guy around here to get through!



  9. Barry

    Barry Just Beastly

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    That is a good point and one that I did not make when sharing my personal anecdotes... I probably have very good, and very short, negotiations because I do not waste a salesperson's time. If I am ready to buy, I let them know if we reach a price agreeable to both of us, the deal is done, no fuss, no muss.

    I know for a fact that people like to "kill time" in dealerships. For some folks that means chitty chat as if you were a customer with sales folks, which makes the sales folks NO money.

    Another thing that I will NOT do is try on gear or take the time of parts guys or other sales staff to have them educate me on an item, knowing I will then buy it online. I feel that is a terribly selfish practice. If I know my purchase will be online, I simply do not go to the dealer.

    Barry
  10. xKLR_John

    xKLR_John Been here awhile

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    It's a give and take situation. There's a dealership in my area (likely the one wb is talking about) run by a couple of brothers. They're friendly. I've been in multiple times over the years to kick tires and buy gear. Never quite saw a bike there I wanted to buy until the 20xx Vstrom 650 was coming out in orange. I really liked the color and was set on buying the new bike from them. When it came time to discuss price it was MSRP+setup+taxes. That was their final offer. No t-shirt, no discount on gear purchased at the same time, nada. Not a penny off of MSRP. I didn't buy.

    It ticked me off at the time but I still liked the folks. I ended up buying a new DR650 from them a couple years later when they were doing $1000 off on remaining 2009's so all's well that ends well, I guess. A "take it or leave it" price policy doesn't seem friendly but it's their business to run.


  11. wb57

    wb57 Long timer

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    PM sent. Not naming names publicly.
  12. cliffy109

    cliffy109 Long timer

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    I'm not a big fan of "set-up" fees either, but it sounds like you were not the only guy in the market for an orange Vstrom. When they have a product that many people are willing to pay for, it doesn't make financial sense to discount it. It isn't really a "take it or leave it" in a negative way. It just means that the next guy that came in was able to get his dream bike which would not have been there if they had sold it to you for a lower price. Simple market forces at work here. The attitude is what makes the difference.
  13. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Set-up fees are nothing new. Triumph had a suggested set-up fee of $17.50 way back before I was born. :lol3

    [​IMG]
  14. xKLR_John

    xKLR_John Been here awhile

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    I get it. I was describing how I felt. Feelings aren't rational or necessarily justified. :D

    It's a bit like buying something from friends. Some folks will hook you up and give you a deal. Others will act identically but try and charge you more than they would a stranger.

    I completely get the business side of the equation, they're in business to make money.

  15. 250senuf

    250senuf Long timer

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    Just for perspective on those prices, what was a good wage back then, $1/hr ?
  16. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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  17. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    Same here, except I prefer to try on clothing before I buy. So, most of my gear comes from a local dealer. I get about 50/50 of my other stuff locally and online. Sometimes it's more convenience than price.
    There's a shop a couple blocks from my house, owned and run by a great guy. I pay a little more than I could elsewhere to keep him in business.


    1911fan
  18. ChadHahn

    ChadHahn Been here awhile

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    The cheapest Chevy Bel Air in 1956 cost $2,025. So for half the price of a car you could get a motorcycle.

    Chad
  19. 1greenmachine

    1greenmachine Been here awhile

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    I bought my bike, jacket and all maintence items from them since i've owned it. I tried to get my first helmet there but it was back ordered so went online and get the next model up for 50 buck less they they wanted for the other. I buy my gear online, i dont walk into a dealer to test fit and buy online, because dont feel thats right.

    That all said i got my rear tire done there, i took just the wheel in and for the road pilot 2 dismount/mount and balance it was 240 which doing some research it seems high. My front tire is now getting wore out so not sure if i'll take it there are buy online and find someone.
  20. Pantah

    Pantah PJ Fan from Boston

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    I buy my dual sport tires online and spoon them on myself. I buy my race tires trackside and the vendor mounts them on the spot. I've never found a shop that I feel comfortable buying online and having them mount and balance for a fee. The shops I deal with are smaller specialty shops for the most part, so If I need their mounting services, I am compelled to pay up for their tires too.