dealing with emergencies.

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by JohnTM, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. Sundance

    Sundance Adventurer

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    I've always meant to do something like this, I like the SD card idea. Thanks for the kick in the arse to get something done. As a medic, I can say most of us will find your dog tags, or bracelet; the tatoo idea won't work unless there's a really interesting tatoo with it.
    #41
  2. Tail Gunner

    Tail Gunner Life is Good !!!

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    In Case of Emergency, or ICE, is a program that enables first responders, such as paramedics, firefighters, and police officers, to identify victims and contact their next of kin to obtain important medical information. The program was conceived in the mid-2000s and promoted by British paramedic Bob Brotchie in May 2005.<sup id="_ref-0" class="reference">[1]</sup> It encourages people to enter emergency contacts in their cell phone address book under the name "ICE". Alternately, a person can list multiple emergency contacts as "ICE1", "ICE2", etc. The popularity of the program has spread across Europe, and has started to grow into North America.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_case_of_emergency

    Andrew


    <sup class="noprint Template-Fact"></sup>
    #42
  3. Lightemup

    Lightemup Adventurer

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    With regards to the SDcard, think about carrying a USB memory key instead.

    I think more computers in the world today have USB ports, than SD card slots.

    I travel with all my personal info, scans etc on a USB key around my neck, and have a backup of all the files on my Laptop and on a seperate USB key in my document folder where my passport, licenses, credit cards etc are.
    I have a MS notepad document on it as the first file besides a folder in the root dir.
    Its named "My Last Will" (Selfexplanatory)
    In the Dir named "Personal Files" I have all the scans of all my personal documents and contact information on my NOK.
    I will now make another one that lies more accessible, thanks for the pointers.
    #43
  4. Big Single

    Big Single Tejas

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    The following is just my humble opinion:

    In most third world places, any sort of electronic storage device will most likely be worthless. A metal dog tag with a telephone number or two is the only way to fly. The telephone numbers should obviously contain your country code.

    In the first world, many EMS and police agencies are going to keyed electronic storage devices. (I believe that's the right term.) In other words, you can't just plug any storage device into their computers. They're protecting their systems from those who would hack or attempt to spread viruses.

    Now, dog tags and some sort of electronic storage device wouldn't be such a bad idea.
    #44
  5. ithiltaen

    ithiltaen Chapter Master

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    German SS troops had their blood type tattooed on their left arm, as they thought it was quite useful (and it was, at least until the Russians found out and started killing everybody with such a tattoo) I have some friends on the military and a couple of them have this tattoo as well: it is a very simple tattoo, just saying "0-" or whatever, but it's visible enough to be seen if you are on the surgery table.

    I've got a question myself: what do you do if you have a mechanical problem you don't know how to fix (or just can't), and there's nobody to help you? As you can guess, I'm not exactly a master engineer...

    And yeah, I mean an answer beyond "you walk" :D
    #45
  6. Maddaddy

    Maddaddy Greg

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    As a Soldier, todays moder medicine Blood type isn't a factor in the ER. Even on the battle field. Sometimes you see Soldiers wearing their blood type on their uniform, but any medic or doctor will tell there's no point in when dealing with trauma.
    #46
  7. Lightemup

    Lightemup Adventurer

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    Its all about the CDI factor man..

    (Chicks Dig It) ;)
    #47
  8. zane121

    zane121 Been here awhile

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    Wow all great ideas. I'm not too worried about being caught out alone somewhere but I do worry about lying unconscious in a hospital. I still carry my dog tags in my vest, a contact card in my helmet, ICE on my cell. I'm comfortable in that. Now for training on what to do if you're in a isolated area and your bike stops running or you get hurt a good emergency kit will help a great deal. you can buy them premade or on line. Of course for training call me for your adv rider discount:p
    #48
  9. klrbaer

    klrbaer Tim

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    As a Fireman and EMT the best option would be to have the dogtags or the info around the neck, or the tattoo on the upper chest. Quiet honestly, at the accident scene alot of things get moved and removed from the pt and quite often the medical tags or the medical bracelett come in very handy. I had a pt last summer that was on his new to him R6 and he took out a 4x4 mail box post with his leg. He was concsous but just kept screeming about his leg and we got our info from the medical braclett he was wearing.
    #49
  10. MegMeg

    MegMeg Adventurer

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    I saw this mentioned in a old thread from 2006 and I think it's worth mentioning again. It's a brilliant idea and I plan to order one. I believe the inventor of this is a member here.

    ResQTag

    It has all the information first responders need and is easy to see and locate (red tag on your jacket zipper), which is perhaps the most important part. I can tell you from experience that the laminated "in case of emergency" card that you might have in your jacket pocket, pants pocket, wallet, or tank bag is absolutely useless in an accident. Fortunately I was conscious to tell the paramedics what they needed to know.
    #50
  11. spqr

    spqr Been here awhile

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    I have combined both my own morbid sense of humor, and the concern of family members. On the back and side of my helmet is written: "If found w/o rider please call [My cell phone] If found on rider please call [A Different number]." THis has served two purposes, my ICE is on the one item I am not seperated, and when a girl askes who the the other number is I can tell her it is my mom. It works wonders.

    Dog tags are a problem outside the US as I do not want to be ID'd as a US Storm Trooper. Depending on my travels I may leave them at home.

    The problem is that the information has to be Durable and Available (Thus the phone numbers are on two places on my helmet).

    I will probaly record critical medical information in the same format found on Shot Records and Passports, on a metal tag that is stored on or in my boot.
    #51
  12. VelvtRide

    VelvtRide i can haz a motrsykle?

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    Nice first post. :thumb


    What do you use to write on your helmet with that doesn't fade or wash off in bad weather?
    #52
  13. donny662

    donny662 Been here awhile

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    This is a lot of great information regarding things I haven't really considered before. Now, I will be better prepared when going on a trip.

    Although, I am a little concerned about keeping personal information such as passport, DL, and credit card copies in an easily readable electronic format. If someone gets a hold of it, they could do a lot of damage before you realize and can take measures to stop it.

    Any information that isn't needed by a first responder or hospital staff should be encrypted/password protected. Leaving sensitive information unencrypted is the same as tatooing it on yourself. Anyway, if you need that sensitive information, you will most likely be conscious and able to enter/give the password. You can leave the password with your ICE contact in the unlikely event that your sensitive information is needed and you are unable to give the password yourself.

    The easiest and most universal way to encryt your data is to put it in a password protected .zip file. Use a program such as WinZip, WinRAR, or 7-zip to create the password protected zip file. Windows XP can even create a password protected file.

    Instructions for Windows XP:
    Step 1:

    Gather all of the electronic copies of documents that you want to take with you but don't want to be accessible without your permission into the same folder.
    [​IMG]

    Step 2:

    Highlight the files that you want to be password protected/encrypted. Right click on the selected files, goto "Send To", and click "Compressed (zipped) folder".
    [​IMG]

    Step 3:

    A file with the extension .zip will be created. If you cannot see file extensions, you will notice an additional file in the list with the same name as another file but it will have a different icon: a folder with a zipper on it (you may not have the same icon if you have a program such as WinZip, WinRAR, etc. installed). You can change the name of your newly created .zip file to whatever you want.
    [​IMG]

    Step 4:

    Double-click on your new .zip file to open it (if a program such as WinZip opens instead of what is shown in the screenshot, right click on the .zip file, go to "Open With", and click on "Compressed (zipped) folders".) You should see in the address bar the icon zipped folder icon and "[Path to your zip file]\[name of your zip file].zip" (circled in red on screenshot).
    [​IMG]

    Step 5:

    With the .zip file opened properly, click on "File" and then "Add a Password...".
    [​IMG]

    Step 6:

    A window should pop-up asking you to add a password to your zip file. The pop-up may be buried under a few windows (it was for me); just move windows out of the way until you find it. Remember to choose a good password that is not easily guessable, is a combination of letters and numbers, and is one that you can remember (or give it to your SO or someone else you can contact if you forget). Do not write the password down and keep it on yourself or your belongings.
    [​IMG]

    Step 7:

    Copy your new .zip file to your SD card, USB drive, Floppy disk, etc. and you're done! It's not that hard to keep your data safe while on the road. Now, when you go to access a document in your .zip file, it should prompt you for a password no matter what program or computer you use to access it.
    [​IMG]

    <hr>
    Not much can make for a sour homecoming to a good trip like a burned down house or a stolen identity.
    #53
  14. crackhead

    crackhead Long timer

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    Not all computers have SW that can unzip .zip files correct??
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  15. VelvtRide

    VelvtRide i can haz a motrsykle?

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    Windows Vista Home Premium doesn't give you an option to password protect the .zip file.
    #55
  16. elgreen

    elgreen Crotchety Contrarian

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    Use WinZip to create the zip file, it has the option to password protect the zip file. You should include the pkzip program itself on the flash, maybe multiple versions of it for multiple versions of Windows and MacOS, in case the computer you plug it into is too old to read new-fangled zips, or too crippled (in the case if Vista Home). Stuffit Expander is probably the easiest one here, since it's free (unlike WinZip) and has both Mac and Windows versions. Use Teh Google to find out where to download these.
    #56
  17. donny662

    donny662 Been here awhile

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    Anything running Windows XP will be able to unzip, but it is possible that you'll find a computer that isn't equipped to unzip. I think anywhere but the most remote of locations in US/Canada/Western Europe (I guess I'm not entirely sure that .zip files are as popular in Europe as they are in the States) will have computers that have a program installed for opening a .zip. You will more likely run into trouble in the less developed countries, and then, those computers might not be able to view the .jpg/.pdf/etc. files that your documents are stored as, anyway.

    7-zip and Zip Genius are a couple more free Win-Zip like alternatives for creating and opening password protected .zip files. I use 7-zip on my own computers; you just have to make sure you are creating a .zip file as the program defaults to its own .7z format.
    #57
  18. BMW Kurt

    BMW Kurt Bannned

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    CycleGadgets.com will give you a small waterproof envelope that attaches to your helmet when you purchase something from their site. My brother-in-law is an EMT and he tells me that they are trained to look for these and medic alert braclets and necklaces.
    #58
  19. quadjohn

    quadjohn Mud is the way

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    i think you all save lifes with your posts.
    Gongratulations!!!!!!!!!!:clap :clap :clap :clap :clap
    #59
  20. pookiebear

    pookiebear Long timer

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    On the ZIP files so you know, it costs about $20 to buy software that will pop that password. IF you are a scrounger/techie you can get the software for free. Password=no good (not encrypted enough). Encrypt those docs!
    #60