dealing with emergencies.

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by JohnTM, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. dsantilli

    dsantilli Not a total n00b!

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    Wow! I am just looking at taking my first long ride(week) in a while and I never thought about doing this but I am now. Thanks for all the great information guys and gals! :1drink
    #81
  2. jkabouwchilexplorer

    jkabouwchilexplorer www.chilexplorer.com

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    SHIT HAPPENS! :evil
    Just do it!! :clap
    The world is round sometime your on top and some live down under :norton
    Who is in control of who ?? :rofl
    #82
  3. jkabouwchilexplorer

    jkabouwchilexplorer www.chilexplorer.com

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    A great gift and an important Emergency kit, it even contains paper.

    [​IMG]

    AN other place of puschase

    http://www.sostalisman.co.uk/

    Do not forget to write down your peronal website were more info is about the trouble one.
    #83
  4. DarrenM1

    DarrenM1 Adventurer

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    Great forum, I bought one of the road id bracelets. It has my DL # along with my wife's contact number. I've attached a link to the site if your interested. I really like my... and I hope its the best 18 bucks I've ever wasted!

    http://www.roadid.com/Common/default.aspx
    #84
  5. fmjnathan

    fmjnathan Adventurer

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    Please carry a photo copy of your name, allergies, medications you take, and medical history. A living will or DNR order is in order. Multiple people to contact at home is useful. I am a medic and have picked up more than one patient during The Rally who is unconsicous and we have no info on them. I carry this info on my person as the luggage may not be broght to the hospital.
    #85
  6. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

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    #86
  7. squirley

    squirley punk in drublic

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    All these ideas are good. As a fireman and paramedic I have responded on many motorcycle crashes and every other kind of unconcious tramatic injury you can think of but take this info with a grain of salt. Police and firemen always look for an ID because it goes in the report. Fold up your emergency info and put it with your ID and write " IN CASE OF EMERGENCY" on it. It will get found if it's on you. In your phones directory an "AA Emergency" so it comes up the first number in your phone book is a good idea. Depending on age of my patients I look for mom, wife, or last number called to inform friends or family of a serious accident. Food for thought.
    #87
  8. Sasquatch2112

    Sasquatch2112 scatology expert

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    That is something that I always carry in any of my vehicles. A wreck that causes a "bleeder" Rip open and pour in. Medics coming back from Iraq swear by the stuff. They say that it will stop the femural (sp?) artery. Now apparently if you have to use the stuff, you will hear cussing from the ER doctor. It is suppposed to be a bitch to get out. I would rather be alive in the ER with the doc mad at me.
    #88
  9. RMZMZM

    RMZMZM Not adventurous

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    Covered in other threads - this is one:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=535678

    For yourself it is always prudent to keep a medical summary card on your person. Include:

    Your Name
    Emergency Contact Numbers and Names
    Any known medical conditions
    Any known allergies
    Current medications

    If traveling with a group make multiples and trade with others so the info can be made readily available to emergency personnel. It is a good idea to adjust your kits based on what you will be doing and if possible coordinate some items with others in your group. I do sport-tour rides (nothing off-road yet) and have to fit everything into my tank bag and suit pockets (no saddle bags).

    It doesn't matter what supplies you pack for emergencies if you don't know how (when) to use them. After I took the ASM course, I put together the following emergency kit for my bike (with the full knowlege that if I am doing anything that requires touching another person - beyond hand holding - that person is already sooo beyond screwed :eek1 )

    6 individually wrapped sanitary napkins - ultra thin, no wings, no deoderant
    6 individually wrapped tampons - no applicators, no deoderant
    1 roll of gauze
    1 mylar emergency "blanket"
    1 pair of shears
    2 pair of medical gloves
    1 disposable cpr mouth sheild
    1 4 oz bottle of saline
    tiny notebook
    mini-golf pencil

    Cell Phone - serves multiple purposes!!

    That covers the medical portion of my kit. I have feminine supplies instead of gauze/cotton pads because the are very absorbant and take up very little space. Also (for some of us) there is more than one kind of "emergency" :evil .

    I keep the gloves, mouth sheild, notebook, pencil and cell phone in my jacket pockets and pack the rest into the tank bag as tightly as possible. I hope like hell I never need to use any of it. This reminds me, time to take a refresher so if I do need it, I can be as prepared as possible for a non-medically trained bystander.
    #89
  10. MudGuard

    MudGuard n00b

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    +1:thumb
    #90
  11. Zerk

    Zerk DILLIGAF

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    I would add to the memory stick, phone #s to call to cancel credit cards,if lost or stolen.
    #91
  12. MitchNJ

    MitchNJ Lets Ride!

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    #92
  13. dacrazyrn

    dacrazyrn ED RN Adventurer

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    bought my son and I the RoadId "dogtags." I think they are good idea anyway, especially with my 7 yr old. Has phone numbers and info on him at all times then.
    I have a $1 off "coupon" to pass on to whomever wants. First 20 to use it in the next 30 days on the site. ThanksTracy617284
    #93
  14. LeftCoastMan

    LeftCoastMan Been here awhile

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    I'm a big fan of the Road ID. I keep contact numbers of 3 key people in my life, plus a brief medical history (2 lines). Those two lines are sufficient for an EMT to make the right choices if I'm suffering a trauma. You have about 1 hour (often called the golden hour) between suffering a trauma and death. The Road ID may give save a healthcare provider precious minutes.

    I'm sure other systems work as well, but the laser etched metal is just about as permanent as I can imagine.
    #94
  15. LeftCoastMan

    LeftCoastMan Been here awhile

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    I'm a big supporter of this ID device. The metal plate is just impervious to destruction, and the only way it's going to be ripped off is if you lose your arm. I have two lines of critical medical information about me, which if needed can reduce time wasted by healthcare workers.
    #95
  16. airborne

    airborne Eighty Deuce

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    Owasso, Oklahoma
    Sorry I didn't find this thread sooner... SPOT is offering a $49.99 rebate on the SPOT Tracker until March 31, 2010 (today). I bought mine for $99.99, so I got it for $50... not bad. The service is $99 a year for the basic subscription up to $160 for the full blown tracker package with GOES membership and rescue insurance. The Tracker feature can be had for free (normally $49.99/yr) by using the promo code "Tracker23" when activating your device.

    All the information in this thread is great, but if you ride outside of cell service, or worse yet, are incapable of making a call, it would be nice for rescue workers to find you quickly. As a pilot, I chose SPOT over a traditional ELT... if I go down, there is no question where I am. When riding, the the same device is tied to my Camelbak.

    The new version (SPOT-2) had some issues when it was first released, but they have them fixed up now. The difference between the two is primarily in size (SPOT-2 is about 60% the size of the Tracker), and SPOT-2 has a couple of additional messaging features and a slightly improved GPS chip. As far as satellite tracking is concerned, both are capable units... Tracker sells for $99 ($50 today) and SPOT-2 is going for $169. Well worth the $$$... check em out.

    SPOT Tracker
    [​IMG]

    SPOT-2
    [​IMG]
    #96
  17. dacrazyrn

    dacrazyrn ED RN Adventurer

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  18. dacrazyrn

    dacrazyrn ED RN Adventurer

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    Greeley, CO
    building on the immediate "dogtag" ID idea. There are lots of USB and interactive types. Not good for EMS/roadside, but very helpful IN the Emergency Dept.
    Best one I have come across is The Medical Passport.
    It has a program built INTO the drive, that records info and assists you. Also goes over Living Will type things with pictures, etc. It does not have HIPPA problems because it is self contained on the drive and not on a server or computer, it is on YOU. Password protected medical info can be loaded on it (including photos and scans-EKG for instance) for more in depth for the provider. Emergency info you specify is available for all to see.
    #98
  19. Sink

    Sink Stay Off The Slab

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    + 1 on the SPOT :thumb

    Have at least one person that you check in with at least once a day.

    Use only one credit card for all your purchases. If you don't check in then they can trace your trail by the credit card. Not perfect but it gives them a pace to start.
    #99
  20. Chuck289

    Chuck289 Air cooled

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    I was wondering how quickly can they determine your blood type. You know, if your knocked out and you don't have it written on a dog tag or something. I want to get a RoadID braclet or somethign similar and want know if blood type is someting worth putting on there.