Death. And why you're more likely to be dead on a scoot.

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by the gimp, Oct 2, 2005.

  1. the gimp

    the gimp n00b Extrordinaire

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    My first post here was one of concern, and concern has continued to be my stance.

    My question? Are you more likely to die on a scooter because of a)your squidlyness, and b)underpoweredness... or are the statistics buggered because of the tourists renting scoots without any training?
    #1
  2. the gimp

    the gimp n00b Extrordinaire

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    So you do, or do not think they are more dangerous than the average cycle?
    #2
  3. Bayou Boy

    Bayou Boy Long timer

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    Okay :huh

    We now return to our regularly scheduled ADVrider BS.
    #3
  4. Rider

    Rider In Your Heart, You Know I'm Right

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    I dunno.
    But I have a feeling some people much more knowledgable than I are gonna wade in here. :brow
    #4
  5. Photog

    Photog Charismatic Megafauna Administrator

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    No.

    It's going to be the rider that determines the safety of the bike. Their skills and judgement.

    As far as the safety of the ride, that's also determined by the other drivers sharing that road..

    In any MSF BRC course, the skills emphasis is on turning and braking. Not putting the spurs to it. The classroom portion emphasizes strategies for staying safe (SEE and Rider Radar).

    In motorcycling, you're most apt to be killed by a driver turning left, and overshooting a curve. (The proper cornering technique is hammered hard in MSF for that reason).

    Neither one of those situations is mitigated by having more horsepower.

    I have owned a chinese scooter, which most people pick on incessantly. Not bottom of the barrel cheap, but not Kymco or Peugeot quality, either. At NO point did I feel unsafe by virtue of it's design, build, braking, or engine output. I was able to stop on the proverbial dime. I was able to corner hard enough on its cheap Cheng Shin tires to get a knee down.

    It's not the machine.

    Proper training and utilizing that training is important.

    The bike displacement or frame design on a DOT spec bike has nothing to do with it.
    #5
  6. the gimp

    the gimp n00b Extrordinaire

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    I agree with you on your first point and that is my greatest concern with the <50cc class. The rider requires nothing. In some places they don;t even need a drivers licence!

    The previously mentioned inexperienced rider on a machine that can barely do 30mph flat out is a danger. DOT rating may or may not have anything to do with it, but horsepower does!

    In my MSF class (years ago) the instructors pointed out the horsepower advantage of a cycle. In the case of the class the biikes were 500cc cruisers. Those cruisers could throttle their way out of a situation where an unsuspecting scooter rider would be crushed. Having been riding for years I can count on one hand the times where I truly have needed more than 500cc, but the first time could have been my demise if i were on a 50cc.
    #6
  7. Marc

    Marc Just sayin...

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    So Gimp, I'm thinking about getting a 50cc scooter for my daily freeway commute into Seattle across the 520 floating bridge. There's a lot of traffic running > 60 MPH, high cross winds and no turn outs or emergency lane - only a metal rail. My Chinaco scooter salesman tells me "no problem."

    Any thoughts? Any statistics? :ear
    #7
  8. MotoMind

    MotoMind Long timer

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    Statistic for you: When a salesman says something, 99% of the time, they're either lying, or they're just not telling you the truth.
    #8
  9. VespaFitz

    VespaFitz No-good-son-of-a-bitch

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    Did the same guy hand the keys to a Hyabusa to a newly minted motorcycle endorsement holder?

    Same difference.
    #9
  10. VespaFitz

    VespaFitz No-good-son-of-a-bitch

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    Having been riding for a decade or so, including a year when I rode in and out of Boston every single day, I can't recall an instance where I've "throttled out of a situation."

    I've braked out of a situation plenty of times. I've swerved out of a situation as well. But throttled? Nope. Can't recall doing that.

    Anybody ever "throttled out of a situation" on a bicycle? :ear
    #10
  11. MMcnamara

    MMcnamara Where does that go?

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    I have both:

    You'll be fine. It's not too far to the water.

    9 out of 10 customers have done no research prior to purchase.

    "Is them tars good?"
    "90,000 mile warranty"
    "Yep, mount 'em up"
    #11
  12. EatAtJoes

    EatAtJoes Ed Venture Heir

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    Concern for my personal safety is the same whether I'm on my KZ1300 or my Ruckus.

    The only bike that I never really felt safe on was my old Penton Mint 400, and that's because it had too much motor.
    #12
  13. S Won

    S Won Been here awhile

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    Every now and then, I commute 25 miles one way to work on my 2003 Yamaha Zuma scooter. I have never had a problem in traffic. I have one stretch of dangerous highway that is posted 55mph. It's about a 4 miles long. All I do is keep to the right side of my lane. If a car comes up behind me, I lightly tap on the front brake lever to flash my taillight. The cars, trucks or rigs pull right in behind me and are very considerate of me and my little slow scooter. I wave them around when there's enough room and give them a little wave. They usually give me a little beep, beep! I love riding the scooter. Great fun! When I get into town and the speedlimits go down, I can throttle around with wreckless abandon and split lanes. It's much faster and easier to get through town on the scooter, than it is on my 950 Adventure!

    When I stop at the gas station to fuel it up, it's usually for free. I stick the nozzle in the fuel tank and tip the hose up and get the gas left in the hose from the last customer. It only holds 1.5 gallons so it not hard to fill it up. I ride to work for free and my buddies at work are paying big bucks to fill the tanks of the new pickups they bought with Employee pricing discounts.

    Sometimes they hate me! :D

    S Won
    #13
  14. gas_pig70

    gas_pig70 Mmm... mud!

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    Tuck across the mid-span, wear a life jacket, and don't forget to let go of the bars before the splashdown. :evil
    #14
  15. donsolo

    donsolo MasterOfLosingMaps

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    87% of all statistics are made up!

    33% of all men wear women's underwear...incorrectly.
    #15
  16. bdemedio

    bdemedio Gas saver Crazy Man

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    I started riding again in the fall after a 25 year hiatus. Its 12 miles to my office thru suburbs and west Philly, and with the price of gas I figured, wtf, buy a scooter kit and ride 2 weeks to work on a gallon. I got run over by a truck in November-I looked right in his mirror at his eyes as he made his right turn and clipped my handlebar. He Knocked the bike out of the way but I stayed put and fell under the truck. I was lucky: I'm ok.
    Now, here's what I have to say about riding in an area with one of the highest murder rates in the world:
    1. Give everyone the right of way unless you are 100% sure they see you and are letting you go. I mean 100%.
    2. Steer clear of trucks, buses and taxicabs. I mean especially taxicabs.
    3. Assume nothing. Always have an alternate escape route.
    4.Always carry a defensive weapon preferably chemical spray.
    5.Never use the designated mc lane except as an emergency escape route.It is too small and people cut in or open their doors in front of you.
    6.Be wary of bicyclists. Most are nuts. They will run a light and cut in front of you. Then you have to honk to get them out of the way.
    7.Have insurance-if people hit you they get the hell out of there.If you hit them they will sue.
    8. Mount a wing camera for your front and rear and wide angle. This way if you are hit you have a photograph. Digital cameras are cheap as heck,durable, and can run off your battery and record the most recent activity when your wheels stop within 5 minutes either way. At least you'll have a pic.
    9.Look around like you have 4 eyes- anticipate with your peripheral vision.
    10. Maintain your bike and have fun riding it!
    #16
  17. BucketHead

    BucketHead Would-Be Camel Man

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    I think a big factor in scooter stats is rider demographic and psychology:

    "Motorcycles are dangerous, Scooters a cute, fun, and safe.

    I'm not going to crash (and if I do it'll be slow) so I don't need any rider education.

    Flip flops and shorts are fine (just like the girl on the beach in the commercial), and a full face helmet is just going to mess up my hair."

    Ride it like you are a motorcyclist and it's a bigger bike, and you'll be fine.

    Cheers,
    Matthew
    #17
  18. p_s

    p_s Nerdly Adventurer

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    True, some dealers even play that up. And riding >50 cc or unrestricted 49cc scooters without getting a motorcycle license. And not having to spend money on gear or even a HELMET. After all it's *just* a scooter. :huh

    Then there's the whole "saving money on gas" thing but that's another thread.
    #18
  19. janner

    janner Been here awhile

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    yes.
    #19
  20. crooked roads

    crooked roads I'm back

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    glad youre haven't fun i'm zuma owner too . Free drips from gas station :huh Ya that will get one oz free wow!
    #20