Delivery Announcement: INGRID is here

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by Abenteuerfahrer, Mar 4, 2009.

  1. mikepa

    mikepa SideCzarist

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2001
    Oddometer:
    306
    Location:
    Seattle, WA in the Great Pacific NorthWET (USA)
    The twin-shock set-up is all new, a request made while I was on tour down in South America on u'Hack 2.0 and the "catastrophic" shock failure I experenced. Jay was in the middle of building the chassis and rigging for U'Hack 3.0, set what they had done aside, and built a new sub-chassis and trailing arm for the tub with dual Progressive shocks mounted in tandem (one fore, one aft). My thinking is, each shock should only have to "work" half as hard, and, should one fail, there is still one out there working, double-redundancy (though, in this case, only half the spring rate).

    Even with this set-up, I'll still always carry one spare shock with a heavy spring installed, so worst case, should both the twin shocks fail, I can install the single spare with a heavier spring rate and carry on.

    I may seem to be goving overboard with this whole shock thing, but I have had a Progressive shock failure on every long-haul tour I've taken so far.

    Can you reply with the exact order/model number of the HyperPro's that you've ordered for the bike? I might be willing to given them a try. I've seen too many failures with the Ohlins, WP and Fox Shocks. So far, the OEM shocks that BMW installs on the line have been the most reliable, but the spring rate is really too soft.

    Thanks!
    #61
  2. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

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    Oddometer:
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    One thing that will kill a shock pretty easily on a sidecar is if it can 'top out' in it's travel regularly. There should be some type of limiting device to prevent this from happening.
    #62
  3. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Hola Mike.....

    It's a HyperPro 3D shock for the front and rear.

    I don't see a model number on my brochure but I'll give you the particulars.

    For the R1200 GS... (article number: BM12-0AAEPM0899

    FRONT: Length 337.5 mm
    Springcup H=0 NO H=
    Spring 1217 (NA 372)
    Preload 22 mm
    SAG 45 +-5mm

    Damping Street (riding purpose)
    Length Adjust No
    Spring Type Pro Purple (color of spring desired(black/purple)
    HPA No (manual preloader)
    Riderweight 105 kg
    Luggage 55kg
    Riding height 0 mm (need not to be accounted)


    Rear: Length 400.5 mm
    Springcup H=O NO H= -10
    spring 1236 (PA 1593)
    preload 26 mm
    SAG 20 +- 5mm

    Damping street
    Length adj No
    Spring type Pro Purple
    HPA YES
    Rider weight 105 kg
    Luggage 80 kg
    Riding height 0 mm

    That's all I got from Klaus...You basically give him your weight; stuff you carry; weight of sidecar+passenger; approx luggage...then he calculates the appropriate shock for you. He doesn't make them. They are custom made for you in Holland to suit your needs. The shaft of the Hyperpro shock is much beefier(16 mm) 2mm larger than the rest.

    Here's his side: http://www.wilbersusa.com/hyperpro-motorcycle-shocks.htm

    He no longer serves or is involved with the Wilbers of Deutschland. They had a missverstaendniss:deal
    #63
  4. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

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    Claude.....you're right about a sidecar shock "limiter". Now get to the drawing board and think of it. You're good at it.

    This shock explosion apparently happened to MikePA on his gorgeous adventure trip to Tierra del Fuego. Mike does and goes pretty extreme riding and is a wealth of information when it comes to roads less traveled and does actual bike/sidecar field testings. Then he passes it on to this site. Although I don't ride as extreme but want a more forgiving shock for the roads to Inuvik(Dempster) and Deadhorse(Haul Road)....:wink:
    #64
  5. mikepa

    mikepa SideCzarist

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2001
    Oddometer:
    306
    Location:
    Seattle, WA in the Great Pacific NorthWET (USA)
    Hey 'Farher -

    Given the build quality going in to your rig, here's some "protective" advice for you, both to protect the finish on the rigging, and also maybe save your right leg from bruises (as me how I know :cry).

    Make some rough measurements of your rigging, to include any wiring you may have cable-tied to it. Head down to your local big-box Home Depot or Lowe's or whatever home builder's supply store is in your area. In the plumbing section, you'll find pipe insulation. It normally comes in 6ft lengths, made of foam, slit down the length so you can slip it over piping. The best stuff is urethane foam (black), not the polyethylene stuff (usually blue or pink). Some stores carry it with adhesive along both sides of the spilt/seam. Buy several lengths in whatever ID you need.

    Slip the appropriate size over the various rigging struts and but to length. When you satisfied with the "fit", pull off the adhesive backing strips and press the seam together. Then, run some cable ties along each length and snug to a loose fit. Voila! You have not only protected your struts from paint/powder coat rock chips, etc., but also provide some padding to protect your shins.

    It'll get torn and banged up in the course of your ride, but is cheap and simple to replace, much easier than spot painting the rock chips later on.

    Also, your local auto parts store should carry an extruded "U"-shaped door edging. Usually, it has a bead of adhesive run along the inside. It's normally applied to the edge of car and truck doors to protect them from chips if you bang into another vehicle (of course, we don't ever have that happen, do we?). This stuff makes a nice edging for the tub's shield, and perhaps that on your bike as well. May also be good to run some around the edge of the trunk lid to keep it from damaging the paint on the tub.

    Finally, go over to the area where they sell various types of foam and edging for door and window sealing. You'll probably find something that is the right cross section, density and shape, with adhesive backing, to run around the inside of the trunk lid, such that it is compressed against the lip on the tub, thus providing a bit of a rain and dust seal. Nice to keep the trunk clean, there's lots of dust and calcium carbonate (which I think is the chemical used for dust control) on the Haul Road.

    Sometimes, it's OK to be anal!

    Best,

    MikeP
    #65
  6. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
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    Thanks Mike for your suggestions.

    Now, many of you who drive Hacks of whatever make might already have solved this. It's in regard to the windshield and it's Bonnet. The Bonnet is the only item holding the windshield in place while you blast down the by-ways at 70 mph. At any speed from 40 to 70+ the Bonnet stretches and on a hot day it stretches even more never going back to its original cut. It's also hard on the common-sense-fasteners. In due time all will break and might fly into your spouses beautiful face. It's not possible to tighten the nuts on the windshields bracket any further without breaking. So, here's a solution..while not too aesthetic but functional! It's been proven to stay in place without stretching at 70 mph, ..eh....:eek1


    This is what you need...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    Now you see it..
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Now you don't...

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    Undo these....[​IMG]

    Fold back....

    [​IMG]

    Go solo riding....

    [​IMG]

    Or fold forward for your Princess to step into the cockpit...

    [​IMG]

    Happy Hacking at 70 mph.....cheers....:clap
    #66
  7. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    4,161
    Location:
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    Pretty crafty on the windshield deal Elmer :clap
    #67
  8. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

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    Thanks Claude....

    Now I am trying to be craftier in developing some isolation mounts for the Tug as the new M72D sits "hard" on the chasis unlike the Ural, Hannigan or even yours? At the same time I don't want to raise the Tug too high..., eh.
    #68
  9. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

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    Mar 17, 2002
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    We have mounted ours in various ways. Make sure the fiberglass is thick enough to carry any point loads the mounts may allow. Best maybe to put a piece of aluminum flat bar or something across the body to distribute the loads.
    #69
  10. RedMenace

    RedMenace Adventure Sidecar

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,294
    Location:
    GoodLiver,Oregon,USA
    check salvage yards for rubber motor mounts or shipping yards for pallet mounts used to ship big electrical equipment. You are looking for rubber blocks with studs coming out of opposite sides. If you can find something that will fit, it will be solid enuf for the rigors of sidecar use and damp some of the vibes, preventing glas fatigue. It won't do much to soften the ride, tho'

    If that is what you are looking for, you need to rig a spring and pivot or some other suspension for the tub
    #70
  11. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Elmer,
    If you use these types of vibration isolators, rubber blocks with studs coming out of opposite sides, (may be able to find them at McMasterCar.com) it is not a bad idea too include a safety strap of some type to secure the body in case an isolator does fail. Maybe something similar to the cable deal like you did on the windscreen.
    The front of the sidecar can be mounted on a set of heim ends so it will pivot up and down.
    I actually like the Chaing Jang system of leaf springs in the rear.
    Two shocks , one on each side of the body, has also been done and worked good.
    #71
  12. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
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    Thanks Claude and Red Menace...for your input and suggestion.

    :wink: I've come up with a poor Man's version, while not perfect as the bolts are not encased separately in the rubber but am sure it will at least vibrate 30% less. Less complaints from the passenger. I did raise it about 1", plan to compress it about 1/4" after getting Claudes idea of adding a bar across the insides of the Tub. Currently I have large spacers but Claudes idea is better, more mass hold down!

    So here is what I did...

    Cut in half these round sanding disc drums for hand drills. Bought three of these. They are 2" in diameter and 2" long. Made of semi-hard rubber.

    [​IMG]

    Cut in half...appropriate hole size drilled..add large spacer....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The rear has 3, while the front has 2...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Rear Dampers underneath Tub...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    2 in the front...


    [​IMG]

    Street tests are on the way as soon as I get the Tubs brake systems...

    Cheers...:clap :D :norton
    #72
  13. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,161
    Location:
    Middleburg, Pa. (Snyder County)
    :thumbup :thumbup :thumbup :thumbup
    #73
  14. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

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    2,310
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    Literite....Absolutely excellent...thanks for the source of these rubbers. I might....hmmnn??....you make me worry..eh,...these AV rubbers are more proper..yep..might order them. In the mean time I am fabricating these bars(also suggested by Claude) across the floor...or you can even f'glass a few more layers inside then no bar would be needed underneath as I raised the Tub 1" already! Cheers, Amigo:clap
    #74
  15. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
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    Location:
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  16. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
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    For those who are about to Hack their 2005 1200 GS. Here are some pictures of how the brake linkage is set up on your bike to a Dauntless sidecar.

    Look for the rear brake master cylinder...and remove the protective cover

    [​IMG]

    Replace the BMW screws that held the cyclinder and protective cover with these long bolts. The round black spacer is to separate the two cylinders.

    ****On left is the plunger rod that pushes the piston in the cyclinder. Make sure that you align the rod as not to interfere with the acutal BMW rear brake stop travel.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

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    Remove the BMW pin...

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    Fasten and align the trigger bolts...
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    Temp routed cable to suit....

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    Waiting for missing Banjo bolt...:huh

    [​IMG]

    This large appendage is the brake line quick disconnect in the event that you want to go solo.

    [​IMG]

    Disconnect.....4 bolts; 3 bundled together electrical cables; 1 brake cable and you're solo....:clap
    #76
  17. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,310
    Location:
    Prescott, Arizona, USA
    Painted the Ruskie 10 L(2,5 gal) Jerry can. It came in military green. 1 coat of white epoxy primer; 2 coats of polyurethane Monza red; three clear coats. Lookin' for "JaegerMeister" logo for the can..:evil

    [​IMG]

    Ruskie Ural steel bracket...

    [​IMG]

    Also painted the Micatech sidecases lemon yellow on the sides and backsides..

    [​IMG]

    Reinforced the right inside trunk wall with 24 oz. roving mat and topped with another layer of chopped strand mat. This should strengthen the wall for the Ruskie's bracket and hanging full gas can.

    [​IMG]

    Rear cross aluminum bar and reinforced fiberglassed floor..

    [​IMG]

    Front reinforced aluminum bar with fiberglassed floor(again 24 oz. roving mat and chopped strand mat for both)...

    [​IMG]

    Cheers.....:freaky
    #77
  18. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
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    Got the Banjo bolt and washers from Jay, so it was bleeding time.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Used DOT3+4> synthec....

    [​IMG]


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    Mighty Mite for bleeding....

    [​IMG]

    Sidecar brake

    [​IMG]

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    Bled about 20 mls before no more air came thru....

    [​IMG]

    Did the normal brake bleeding and all seemed to be well. Closed the bleed valves and tested the sidecar brake by jacking-up the sidecar wheel. Spun the wheel by hand and stomped on the bikes rear brake....:eek1 ...sidecar wheel spun happily along:cry ...no action whatsoever with fluid filled bike side master cylinder to stop Tubs wheel...

    Toyed with the right(linked to sidecar) master cylinder where one can adjust the pushrod. Loosened lock-nut and turned the rod up. Pushed on brake and I felt the brake pedal hit something solid. This also prevented the BMW rear brake from stopping the bike completely. Turned the sidecar mastercyclinder rod further down...BMW rear brake goes back to normal and stops bikes rear wheel but does nothing to the sidecars wheel...So, where did I err...?

    [​IMG]

    Won't touch BMW rear brake plunger adjustment..but what should I do with the sidecar plunger adjustment..I am all :ear with your expertise..suggestion. Have no idea of the internal works of the master cyclinder that's pushed by the plunger rod. What's above the plunger rod; piston...valve..? Notice the plunger rod thread on the right (sidecar) is turned down which makes the BMW rear brake stop fully. Screwing it up prevents stopping the bikes rear....

    [​IMG]

    Ach, du lieber...I need help:wink:
    #78
  19. mikepa

    mikepa SideCzarist

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2001
    Oddometer:
    306
    Location:
    Seattle, WA in the Great Pacific NorthWET (USA)
    Hi 'Farher -

    The master cylinder pushrod normally has a rounded/ball end that pushes directly against the piston. At the risk of stating the obvious, is it possible that the adjustment (that is, the adjusted length of the tub's master cylinder actuation rod) is just really touchy? As it is now, the tug's brake works, but the tub's doesn't. When you adjusted the tug's master cylinder push rod until it was long enough to actuate the tug's brake, the bike's wouldn't work. Is it possible you just sort of need to cheat up on it little by little, making small incremental adjustments to increase the length of the tug's pushrod until you acheive that happy balance? Brakes sytem is pretty simple, and sounds like you bled it correctly.

    Best,
    #79
  20. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
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    Hi Mikepa,

    Did everything you mentioned; no dice! I suspect: wrong part; it's probably for the 1150's or even the 1100's...Why doesn't the left plunger rod and it's locknut look the same as on the right. The one on the left has a locknut and permanent nut on the rod for adjusting, while the right one only has a locknut on the rod. In order to adjust the right nut one must use nose plyers to screw up or down. Oh, sure the right one will work for the Tub's brake if not linked together with the left one but apparently cannot work in tandem.

    Another e-mail to the Northwet.....:huh
    #80