DIY Motorcycle Lift

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Ricardo Kuhn, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    Sailah:
    Nice:clap
    How far off the floor is the table when it's lowered?
    You might want to consider the HF chock, rather than build something.
    I use them for trailering and on my lift:D
    Ken
    #41
  2. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    Ken,

    It's 6.75" according to the manufacturer.

    I have bought enough things with moving parts from HF to know that I'm better at welding and machining than Wang. I'm already almost done other than the waterjetting out of the plates and some welding

    Took apart the spare hydraulic unit, really well made wow. for $49. I rewired the motor for 230v. Got the wiring schematic so I need to get some help from a buddy to get everything working

    [​IMG]
    #42
  3. I GS 1

    I GS 1 I 90S I

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    Great site. Thanks. My next project but one
    #43
  4. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    Probably ranks as one of the best deals I have ever scored. table is mint underneath due to the dust skirt. The motor looks new I removed it so I can rewire at home for 230V. The underneath is so clean I'm just going to leave it. Top I'm going to paint, no way I'm dragging that into powder booth. Couple weld boogers on the top that need grinding. I'm thrilled with this bad boy, I've built and worked on too many bikes on the ground.

    I guess I didn't need the extra hydraulic unit. Found an Allen-Bradley raise lower switch on ebay for $20, I also need some hookup cord maybe $20 worth.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #44
  5. Luke

    Luke GPoET&P

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    That looks awesome. I'd keep the dust skirt, I hate reaching into those sorts of places to get dropped bolts and sockets.
    #45
  6. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Sweet! That would be ideal for an in-ground application, for bikes and cars!

    [​IMG]

    This guy has a killer garage! http://12-gaugegarage.com/index.html

    Jim :brow
    #46
    crikey1 likes this.
  7. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    Yeah I saw his build he had that looks killer. At the moment the table is just going to be drive on. At some point I might drop in the ground.
    #47
  8. arcanum

    arcanum Been here awhile

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    This one looks interesting. I happen to have the Harbor Freight high lift motorcycle jack and like it a lot for working on the size bikes I ride. Add the extension like this one to a 30'' lift and it could get interesting for those times that you want a platform under the tires. Harbor Freight item # 99887 if you want to see the jack
    #48
  9. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    I think this is one of the best ideas for those of us that already have a motorcycle jack. Of all I've seen, I think I will steal this idea over the winter.
    #49
  10. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    i'm curious why folks are lifting bikes with articulations that require the wheels to be on the bike. both times i lifted the bike off the ground it was to do suspension work, and the wheels, fork tubes, swingarm were all removed, so a floor lift wasn't really a good choice.

    tossing a couple of ratchet straps over the rafters worked great. the bike was stable, and barely off the floor (of course it could have gone higher if i wanted) so re-inserting suspension pieces was easy to align and do.


    why are people lifting bikes with the encumbrance of the wheels being -required- to do so ?
    #50
  11. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    OK, there seems to be a lot of interest in this lift so heres a link to more Pics/details about it.
    LOOK HERE https://www.klr650.net/forums/showthread.php?t=100128

    Here's another made of wood, actuated with a floor jack
    [​IMG]

    MORE PICS http://www.triumphtalk.com/gallery/workshop-tools/p1278-home-made-bike-lift.html
    :wink:
    #51
  12. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Depends on the bike and what you are doing to it. Also, I do not have open rafters, and am not crazy about the bike hanging.

    You can work on the suspension on a table lift same as you can on the ground.

    [​IMG]
    Hard to do this hanging from the ceiling.

    I can easily get my bike off the wheels and do suspension work on a table lift. But I can't get my bike on a bull lift. The bike would not like being supported on the exhaust.

    In some cases it is different tools for different jobs, but a table lift is the most versatile of all the lifts.

    Jim :brow
    #52
  13. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    +1 and you back the bike onto the lift, chocking the rear wheel, to work on the front suspension:huh
    Ken
    #53
  14. Hybridchemistry

    Hybridchemistry ...

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    That scissor jack is slick! Might be high time I started to improve my welding skills :D:thumbup:
    #54
  15. MadM

    MadM Dreamer

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    #55
  16. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Nice!:clap

    Do you have a better shot of where that jack connects to the arm, and what size jack it is? Is there some kind of safety to keep it from collapsing?

    Jim :brow
    #56
  17. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    #57
  18. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    #58
  19. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    Go to the link for more pics:lol3
    #59
  20. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    The last photo doesn't show the pipes as capped. I can only assume that it was done since they are threaded, for safety reasons. Those threads are sharp, plus it would keep the pipes in place.

    Jim :brow
    #60