DIY, No Garage, no money, 4 Months of time but a plan! (and introduction)

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by Bavarian Honda, Oct 27, 2012.

  1. Bavarian Honda

    Bavarian Honda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    11
    Location:
    Munich, Bavaria
    Hey!
    I have been the following the forum for quite a while, especially some extensive bold threads of 950/990 KTMs.

    Now I'd like to intruduce myself and my project:

    (@ admins: Not sure if this project belongs in the Old School, or Some Assembly Required forum. Feel free to move it If you feel, that I picked the wrong one.)


    My name is Jost, I'm 26 and just finished my degree as an Industrial Designer in Munich.
    Last summer, a friend and I cycled (yes bicycle) from Munich, Germany to Lisbon, Portugal, which was quite a trip… -> http://bridgesnotyetcrossed.tumblr.com/

    Why am I telling you that? Because that bicycle trip was the reason, why I bought my motorcycle…

    While we fought our way up the Mount Ventoux in the South of France ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mont_Ventoux ) it was just one motorcycle, too much, that passed me with ease, while I was pedaling like a madman, knowing that we still had about 2000km to go and very little time in order to catch our flight in Lisbon. That moment, I decided, that I was going to buy myself some internal combustion two-wheeler, when home.
    Still on the road, I used every WiFi-spot I could find to do research on what I wanted.
    When I was 16 I had a 125cc Suzuki chopper, which was hate and love relationship, because on the one side it was my two wheeled freedom, living in the swabian countryside, on the other hand… well it was a 125cc Suzuki chopper… It was slow, had terrible suspension, was way to small for a 6'3" teen and, yes it was a chopper…

    After fancying, buying an old GSX-R 750 or a Supermoto, I quickly deciding for a Honda CB750 DOHC.
    I cannot stress this enough, but German laws are über strict, when it comes to modifications on road vehicles. So the bike had to be at least from the mid 80ies or earlier, because softer laws apply for these (mirrors, mufflers, emissions, noise, indicators, blabla…)
    It had to be air-cooled, (kinda) fast, reliable, and of course cheap. All that reduced options. So no Italians (neither cheap or reliable). I fancied an old BMW, but they are all a bit more expensive, even here, in their hometown.

    So I went up to my attic, grabbed all the bicycle stuff I didn't need anymore, sold it on ebay and made about 900€.

    I found a nice '83 CB750 KZ, not very far away from me which was technically good, visually not so much. And that was good. I wanted I bike, that I would not feel bad chopping up.
    I got it for 800€ with fresh safety inspection (TÜV) good for two years, K&N filter (not single pods, but inside the air box), braided brake lines , Koni Shocks and a terrible paint job and 60.000 km on the odometer.
    The (private) seller was a really nice bloke and offered to take it back, if I didn't like it.


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]



    The plus of the CB 750 DOHC is, that lots of parts are cheap, widely available and interchangeable with the 900cc and 1100 versions. Engine-swap in 2014?!? ;)

    The first thing I did, was to paint the tank, fairing and tail flat black.


    Being an industrial design student, I did some photoshopping, to figure out what I was going to do with it.

    Before:
    [​IMG]


    After:
    [​IMG]
    Oh, there is a supertrapp muffler, that I forgot to include in the photoshopping, that I got cheap.


    Objective:
    -less weight
    -ridable (no firestones, low suspension, etc…)
    -doable, because I would like to do 99% of the work myself (no custom frame, etc…)
    -(looking) legal --> not drawing too much attention of the police, laws are strict, here
    -cheap

    I wanted to keep the style of tank, because I think it is quite iconic. I found a cool 750/900F Tank on ebay. paint job is custom, I would guess in Honda racing colors and quite well made. It still has a swiss road tax sticker from 1988. I polished it up and like it with all it's dents.

    Since I had to focus on my degree, I had the tank hanging on my wall and rode the bike for a year in all its (now ratty) 80ies glory.

    It has a season registration, that ends with October.
    I do not have a garage nor a spot to work on my bike. So this is the plan: I will drive the bike 140kms to my mothers house where i will take it apart.
    Some parts like engine, exaust, old tank, seat, handlebar I will leave there and take the frame, wheels and some stuff back to Munich were I can work on it in the University's metal workshop (TIG welder, etc).
    We are not really supposed to do stuff like that but, I'm sure it will be ok. My dean, by the way is quite a cool guy and designed a couple of motorcycles, like the new Horex VR6 http://www.horex.com/en/vr6-roadster.html

    I have 4 months now, till the end of March, when my registration starts again, very little funds, little time and no real workshop…

    I will try to document the process as good as possible, but cannot promise daily updates.

    Looking forward to your comments and suggestions (please no word about pipe wrap - I like it, and don't want any discussions about it.)


    Jost
    #1
  2. England-Kev

    England-Kev Long timer

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    Location:
    England. Somewhere on the Canal.
    Welcome to the madhouse, looking forward to your progress....:lurk
    #2
  3. rotax793

    rotax793 gravel hunter

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    Sweden
    go on... :-)
    #3
  4. ADK

    ADK ____

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    fix your photos please. :norton :freaky
    #4
  5. Bavarian Honda

    Bavarian Honda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
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    Munich, Bavaria

    Thanks. Me, too. looking forward, to tearing it apart next week.

    Done.
    #5
  6. jitterymonkey

    jitterymonkey Been here awhile

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    406
    Location:
    Canton Ohio
    #6
  7. Bavarian Honda

    Bavarian Honda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    11
    Location:
    Munich, Bavaria
    Well, for the battery I have two options, kinda 3:

    1. There's a german company selling very small (54x68x110mm)batteries (not cheap, though, at 155€). I'm pretty sure I can find a little spot below the tank, above the carburetors or somewhere else.
    You might want to youse google translate for their site:http://shop.motofreakz.de/Ersatztei....html?XTCsid=705d12a998dde927fbaa4e8a7030c001

    In this video they try to drain the battery with a 1100cc. After strating the bike after the winter, they unplug the ignition and let the starter run and run... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CD7wohIadXw&feature=player_embedded
    ...And my bike is only 750cc.

    I haven't done any research on that specific battery yet, though.

    2. If funds don't allow solution #1, I will build a box like here:
    [​IMG]

    3. or like CRD, where they hid the battery below the swingarm, but I don't want to have battery in such an exposed spot and laying on its side. http://www.bikeexif.com/honda-cb750-5

    Btw, this is what the bike looks like, right now:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #7
  8. Bavarian Honda

    Bavarian Honda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    11
    Location:
    Munich, Bavaria
    So I did some more research...
    Again: Getting the planed changes (Pod, filters, supertrapp, rear loop on frame) approved is really difficult here in Germany, especially in Bavaria if the Inspector is not your brother-in-law...
    The problem is: If you have a crash and unapproved modifications on your bike (even something minor like different tyres, than the ones in the bikes papers, handlebars...) you loose your insurance coverage and can prepare for a bit of legal trouble.

    Via telephone, I spoke to a guy who is specialised in modifications of the CB 750/900/1100 DOHC models and he told me he could get me virtually anything approved.:D (K&N, Supertrapp, frame-mods, 900/1100cc engines, custom cnc rearsets, etc...)
    Only problems: Inspection fees are expensive and his garage is on the opposite side of the country.

    He asked me if I wanted to do anything about the suspension and suggested the following:

    Rear: Swingarm from Yamaha FZR 1000 (with attachment points for the stereo shocks welded on), wheels, brakes also from the same bike. Only minimal changes needed.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]




    Front: Complete front end swap with Yamaha FZR 1000 (43mm forks) or Yamaha Thunderace (48mm forks, adjustable rebound and compression), the brakes are the same as of the R1. Probably better than affordable USD forks, and keeping the oldschool look.
    The secret: I could keep the upper and lower triple trees, stem, brakes, etc. Only changes needed: different bearings.
    Well, that was new to me. There are so many advantages of this. No need/cost for custom cnc'd tripple trees (which i would never get approved). Upper triple trees for normal handlebars are available on ebay.
    The front fender is but ugly, though. But I have ideas for that.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Still this all depends on what my budget looks like in one or two months. He told me I could not imagine how big a difference this would make... :evil


    Now back to the real world again: I packed all my tools, lots of small and big plastic zip-bags, labels, boxes, brake cleaner, silicone remover, WD40, a role of scotch-brite sanding sponge, etc. Will drive the bike out of Munich to my mothers place next mondaywith the Viano. There I will make an oil change and then tear it apart. I won't touch the insides of the engine, though. Too much work and complicated for me at the moment, I'm sure.


    I will:
    -soak all the screws day before taking the bike apart.
    -put something underneath the bike, to prevent leaks and stains.
    -take lots and lots of pictures of details like cable routing, assembly, adjustments, bla...
    -sort the screws meticulusly in the plastic bags with labels and then put the matching part bags in boxes. (For example: brake disc-screws in one little, labeled bag, then attach little bag to brake disc...)
    -mark all the bags with srews that i will need again and then replace them with stainless screws.
    -bring a good lamp, a thermos flask of tea, a beer and some music, blabla...
    -put cloth in the intake and exaust ports of the enginge, to prevent dirt from getting in.
    -clean all the parts that i take of.


    I have a Swingarm lift and a front lift, that goes in the steering stem/headtube.

    Do you guys have any tips for pulling the bike apart?:ear
    I've never done this before... Have a repair manual, though.
    #8
  9. Airhead Wrangler

    Airhead Wrangler Adios Mexico

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6,648
    Location:
    Back in Seattle, FINALLY
    [​IMG]

    Raise that headlight up about 3cm and it'll be juuuuuuust right. :clap
    #9
  10. Harry Backer

    Harry Backer Ran when parked!

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    373
    Location:
    Danville, Il

    Don't forget pics of everything. My memory isnt that great so the digi camera is my freind.
    #10
  11. Bavarian Honda

    Bavarian Honda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    11
    Location:
    Munich, Bavaria
    Mmm, naaah. I played around a lot and want the headlight low and towards the fork.
    I know, how essential the position of the headlight is and can never understand when people use long headlamp-brackets and then mount them so high. Will do the finetuning on th ebike.



    Will do that.
    #11
  12. Beater

    Beater The Bavarian Butcher

    Joined:
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    Atlanta, GA, USA
    +1,000,000. Sometimes a picture can save your ass. Really take pics of everything. Lots of them. especially of places that have a lot of parts ... Heads, Electricals, Exhaust. Also get familiar with a parts fishe.
    #12
  13. Bavarian Honda

    Bavarian Honda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    11
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    Munich, Bavaria
    Oh electricals... :puke1
    That, I am afraid of. I will try not to mess with the electric system, if possible.
    What did you mean with that?
    #13
  14. Airhead Wrangler

    Airhead Wrangler Adios Mexico

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    Back in Seattle, FINALLY
    I agree, Long headlight ears look weird to me. Keep it in tight to the steering head. I just think you need to slide it up the fork legs a little. That's just me though. I really like the direction you're headed.
    #14
  15. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    :lurk
    #15
  16. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

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    Central CT
    Hi Jost (and Welcome),
    I also really like your project. It looks neat and practical. There are lots of these DOHC Hondas around going to waste, it's good to see one being thoughtfully modified. Good idea blacking out those ComStar wheels. Trust us Old Farts though, the only thing that looks less than good is the low headlight. Keep it tucked in close to the forks, but raise it up a bit. Would we lie to you?
    Also, snow? Already? That's miserable.
    #16
  17. Bavarian Honda

    Bavarian Honda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    11
    Location:
    Munich, Bavaria
    Made some Progress, I guess.
    worked on the bike for 12 hours and this is the result:
    [​IMG]

    Would have helped, if had somebody to help me get that 88kg engine out or to have some sort of bike lift.

    What came as a surprise to me: not a single screw or bolt gave some actual resistance and I got them all out.:freaky

    Not bad for a 30 year old bike that stood in the rain for the last eight months.

    I will write a more detailed report with pictures and answer your replies when I get back to Munich tomorrow.

    :clapJost.
    #17
  18. spdjnky

    spdjnky Been here awhile

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    Love the direction of the project.

    Just my humble opinion... after you take all the pictures of the bike during tear down transfer them to a flash drive. I have heard too many peoples computers crashing and they are out of luck.
    I used electricians number cards to label every plug and circuit on my CB750 when I disassembled it. I wont remember everything otherwise. :D
    #18
  19. bmwloco

    bmwloco Long timer

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    :freaky
    #19
  20. Euromad

    Euromad Been here awhile

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    Very impressed BavNoo! Your photoshop design is awesome.
    My suggestion is to do modifications in stages.
    This allows you to do a certain amount of work and then ride it until you're ready for the next step.
    Doesn't exhaust your money as quickly and you can spend more time getting the right piece for each detail.
    Good luck!
    #20