DIY Quick Release Mounting for Trunk Case?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Casper137, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. Casper137

    Casper137 When in doubt Mumble

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    102
    Location:
    Cottage Country, Lake Simcoe, Ontario
    So I purchased a 09' DL650A recently and wanted to put a tail case on it.

    Although I have massive TraX side cases I didn't really want a large rear case so I purchased one of the Duratool D00468 cases.

    [​IMG]

    (^^ not my bike)

    Now I'm staring at it wondering how to go about installing it.

    I'm sure I could just screw some holes in the bottom of it and put a bolt facing upwards from the OEM rack up into the case and bolt it on and be done with it.

    Little dab of silicone on the holes and I'd be good to go.

    BUT I kinda want it to be easily removable.

    SO now I'm thinking maybe use a wingnut on the inside of the case to tighten it down to a bolt that comes up through the OEM rack with rubber washers to cut down on vibration maybe ...but I'd be worried about it backing out.

    Or use one of these ...

    [​IMG]

    and tighten a wingnut on and then use the cotter pin as a failsafe?



    Looking for ideas from people who have mounted these with or without DIY quick release setups.
    #1
  2. bryantjt

    bryantjt Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,387
    Location:
    Far Upstate NY
    #2
  3. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    13,125
    Location:
    Canada's ocean playground
    I would do similar except use plastic knobs that are threaded for the interior.

    There was a slick setup here a while back where the guy used router table channel to fit the case on.
    #3
  4. Casper137

    Casper137 When in doubt Mumble

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    102
    Location:
    Cottage Country, Lake Simcoe, Ontario

    The first link has some great products.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?hl=en-GB&gl=GB&v=x6vt5XhBgFw

    That's basically what I want to do except it would be hard to line up the holes (the one for the bracket and the one on the bottom of the case that would have to be drilled to feed the top screw down into.)

    Which is why I'm more thinking to mount a not too long, semi permanent bolt pointing upwards form the OEM rack and then I would set the case down onto it and twist threaded knobs down onto it.

    Then maybe drill a tiny hole in the end of the bolts to put a cotter pin through.


    The second link although ingenious I found to be way to involved and messy for the bike (with the wedling and what not).



    Great great idea to use threaded knobs instead of wingnuts.

    Cleaner (although I'd be the only one seeing the inside and underside) but also less likely to damage any contents in the case.


    The router table channel is a good idea as well as you could basically just use any sort of channel and et a setup somewhat like this.

    [​IMG]

    attach the round bar to the bottom of case and attach the rails to the OEM rack and slide off/on as needed.






    I was also thinking about another option.


    A monitor mount or tv wall mount.

    They make these in quick release styles and they seem to be weighted for 30 to 40 lbs.

    [​IMG]

    Again, attach the top piece that usually connects to the monitor to the bottom of case and the bottom piece directly to the OEM rack.

    Quick connect on/off.
    #4
  5. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,641
    Do a pic of your existing rack and I'll feed ya a quick release idea. if you have what I'm thinking, it's simple, clean inside and out, easy to fab, rock solid.
    #5
  6. GillT

    GillT Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Oddometer:
    141
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Interested In knowing what your idea is...I have a setup it appears similar to the OP.
    #6
  7. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,641
    Rotation lock.
    #7
  8. Casper137

    Casper137 When in doubt Mumble

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    102
    Location:
    Cottage Country, Lake Simcoe, Ontario

    With the rubber padding still on.


    [​IMG]

    With the rubber padding removed. (which I haven't done yet but have read it comes off relatively easy with some dishsoap on the nipples).



    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #8
  9. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,641

    Interesting. What you need is some room under it ans it looks like you have some at the outside of the big cutouts.

    A rotation lock (flat pivoting motion) works by having a plate go through a hole and then rotate so it doesn't come out.

    You fasten the plate to the bottom of the box. Button head capscrews and fender washers on the inside so it's smooth. You then place the box on the rack at an angle so the plates go through the holes in the rack and rotate it so it's strait and the plates have pivoted under the edges of the holes in the rack to retain it.

    That rack is all styled up to look kewl. Not intended for serious carrying-stuff duty. makes it more difficult. Two J-plates facing the outside should work. You want them as big as possible and still release.

    You might consider a flat sliding motion rather than a flat pivoting one to engage the lock plate.

    That rack looks curved (I would really consider loosing the thing!) so you might put a plate on the rack and bolting it down to get a flat surface, then have the lock plate in the box engage that. So you would put large round holes in your rack plate and thin hocky pucks on standoffs on the box. These go through the holes in the rack plate and slide forward or backwards to lock. Square holes and hocky pucks work too.

    Two pieces of angle, on on the box and the other on the rack retain it from moving. Small padlock or carabiner through holes in the angles. you can also just do a hole in the rack for a padlock and carabiner. The hole is revealed when the box slides or pivots into the locked position and you stuff something in it.
    #9
  10. Hucker

    Hucker Lost

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Oddometer:
    695
    Location:
    Southern AZ
    I think you just called me slick...LOL

    Here's how I did mine:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Tighten the knobs on the inside and you're done. Cut a diamond plate and set on top of the knobs if you need a flat bottom...here's the finished product.

    [​IMG]
    #10
  11. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,641
    That's very nice!

    Channel from woodworkers supply (avoid incra or other "name" channel).

    You can get rid of the knobs on the inside by putting them in the channel from below. The box gets bolts (square head is ideal) and nuts with the nuts on the inside. Use domed head finishing nuts. The channel is drilled, gets a nut on the inside and a knob with threaded post on the outside. Can make up from a threaded knob by add a bolt and some loctite. Tightening the knobs pushes the channel down and away from the rack and clamps the box. Do some cutaways in the channel lip with a dremel so the bolt heads from the box drop in, then only a small slide rather than having to move them the length of the channel. Some hot glue under the dome nuts on the inside keeps the bolts oriented to go in the channel.

    I'd add a small Hitch clip or circlip (either can be done with a drill press and dremel) to the knob bolt shaft between the channel and box so it cannot be lost.

    The two-wing plastic knobs are compact and just using regular wing nuts (stainless please :1drink) is both compact, cheap and easily available.

    You can do the thing with bolts coming down from the inside of the box through holes in the rack and wingnuts and hitch clips underneath.

    Where the bolts come through the box ad a jamb nut (they're thin) outside the box to retain them. Then you can put the box on without unloading it to get to the bolt heads inside. Works with the various knob/channel setups too. A jamb nut can also be used on the inside in place of the dome nut. Use locktite.

    The most flush thing you can put in the box is a T-nut. Essentially this makes a threaded insert through the box with a big flat flange on top. You drill for the body, then install it hot while threaded on a bolt so you have something to grab. The tangs will melt into the plastic so it sits almost flush. Will take being pulled on--any amount of force. Push on it from below and serious force will pop it out.


    The soft puffy grid type kitchen/toolbox shelf liner makes nice box liner. non slip. Cheap to replace.
    #11
  12. Casper137

    Casper137 When in doubt Mumble

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    102
    Location:
    Cottage Country, Lake Simcoe, Ontario
    Thank you Hucker.

    This is basically exactly what I was looking to do and the pictures explain it so simply.

    I actually have a couple pieces of aluminum channel laying around so this will be a pretty simple setup.

    Now I just have to figure out where the hell to get those threaded knobs.
    #12
  13. SantaFeTrailer

    SantaFeTrailer Stromtrooper

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2011
    Oddometer:
    383
    Location:
    End of the Trail
    Here's what I came up with on my DL1K.

    I used [​IMG] so there is nothing sticking up when the case is off.
    #13
  14. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    72,007
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    Hucker,

    What box is that? I like it a lot!

    Jim :brow
    #14
  15. p0diabl0

    p0diabl0 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2011
    Oddometer:
    597
    Location:
    San Diego
    Seahorse SE-540
    #15
  16. drm

    drm Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    763
    Location:
    gallatin, tn
    where'd you get that aluminum channel?

    #16
  17. rick3foxes

    rick3foxes Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2011
    Oddometer:
    106
    Location:
    NC, USA
  18. Casper137

    Casper137 When in doubt Mumble

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    102
    Location:
    Cottage Country, Lake Simcoe, Ontario
    I wish I could tell ya but I 'borrowed' them from my buddies welding and metal fabrication shop.
    #18
  19. drm

    drm Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    763
    Location:
    gallatin, tn
    #19
  20. drm

    drm Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    763
    Location:
    gallatin, tn
    Ha! :rofl
    #20