Does ATGATT have a downside?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by moron, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. moron

    moron alright guy see the Todd Snider song Thank you.

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    No, I'm not recommending riding without adequate safety gear: thanks for asking. :D

    But I keep reading Face plant reports where the rider has apparently (I recognize the difficulty of communicating in this medium) made a significant error and been involved in what was very likely an avoidable accident. Often those folks are very proud of the fact they were ATGATT but gloss over their responsibility in the wreck which IMO is much more important.

    Is it possible we're worried too much about dressing properly and not enough on riding properly? Can ATGATT give us a false sense of security?

    (And BTW: damned if I know. I just hoped it would make for interesting discussion.)
    #1
  2. fullmonte

    fullmonte Reformed Kneedragger

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    I've crashed on the street and the track and I'll be the first to admit it was my fault. The leathers saved my skin both times so I'm a firm believer in ATGATT. I won't say it gives me a false sense of security but riding in anything less makes me feel extremely vulnerable. Frankly, the nightly 20+ mile bicycle ride is much more dangerous. Worst wreck I've had was during a bicycle race. Road rash hurts. So does having a Shimano 105 cassette grind your right ankle into hamburger meat.
    #2
  3. Random

    Random Quiet Adventurer

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    Just like people that have four wheel drive cars and trucks can become over confident in their vehicle's ability to go anywhere, riders that wear ATGATT can begin to feel invulnerable. We're dressed up like football players, what can hurt us? So yes, it's possible.

    I don't think I push the envelope so, no not me.

    The downside issues I see are, heat, dehydration, ridicule. My Darien is hot in Ohio's August heat and humidity. On longer trips I drink water by the gallon to stay hydrated. When I ride with a group, rarely, I'm almost always the only one ATGATT. They make fun of me :cry . I'm almost always the last one ready to go after rest/fuel breaks.

    Then again :D I don't get wet when it rains. I don't get hit in the eye by June Bugs. I only had a little bitty bruise when I had my only get off :knockwood.

    .02
    #3
  4. motogon

    motogon Like wind

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    In my opinion many suit (including Roadcrafter) way too bulky for normal riding. They actually limit your ability to move and properly react on road hazards. By definition riding motorcycle about (especially off-road): motorcycle constantly loosing balance and rider constantly make correction by steering and balancing with body movement. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    ThatÂ’s why after I tried couple suits I stopped one that provides just enough protection and less limiting. Same with boots, gloves and helmet.
    #4
  5. MoMan

    MoMan PigPen

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    Crashing is inevitable, skill has nothing to do with it. Everyone will crash, it's just a matter of when, how bad and how often. A motorcyclist could only crash once in their lifetime while others (who shall remain nameless) seem to have a problem with gravity pulling them down.

    A lot of riders don't practice ATGATT (though not of this forum) and they are silent in their embarrassment and/or pain.

    The only downside to ATGATT...it takes longer to get ready for a ride.


    #5
  6. Ceej

    Ceej Been here awhile

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    Theres plenty of downsides to wearing gear, but none of them are at all related to your riding skill. Skill is skill, gear isn't going to change that. Gear will, however, be a pain in the ass to put on/take off, smell bad, get dirty, cost a lot, be hot and not look cool. I'm still going to wear it.
    #6
  7. Berserker 1

    Berserker 1 Getting lost since 1972!

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    anyone comment "Dang I wish I hadn't had all that gear on when I wrecked!" or "That minute 30 it took to get my gear on was a total waste of time!" But I have seen a few riders with their back, arms, shoulders, knee's looking like hamburger, with grit ground into the skin and bone, plenty of which was left on the asphalt. Then spending a couple of months getting over their wreck.

    In my wreck last June, if I hadn't hit the guard rail breaking my arm, I would have gotten up and walked away from a 55 mph get off. I still got up and walked away.

    It's a choice, kind of like skydiving with or without a parachute.

    For me...ATGATT always!
    #7
  8. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

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    I have people at work ask me "Isn't it a pain to put on all that gear every time you ride?" To which I reply "less painful than healing!" ;-) To me it's just part of the ride so no big deal. And yes I have crashed, and yes it was totally my fault, but what difference does it make, the gear protected my body so I simply got up and walked away. the only mark I have from that crash is a small burn on my ankle where my boot buckle got so hot dragging along the ground trapped under the bike it burned my ankle through the thick engineer boot leather. I just cringe seeing anyone riding in shoes / sneakers.

    I will concede that at times wearing my full face helmet and all my gear, that I feel a little invincible. Nothing like when riding my dirt bike with helmet, boots, gloves, jersey, chest protector and pants where I feel vulnerable ALL the time and just know it's gonna hurt when I crash. :deal

    Kinda on this same subject, why do dirt riders wear so little gear? Our son just crashed doing about 50mph down a gravel road and scraped up his arms pretty good. he just had on a t-shirt cause his riding jersey was dirty, but the jersey wouldn't have helped him here either. He always wears his helmet, mx boots, gloves and riding pants.

    Jodie and I just bought the DRs and are starting to do some dual sport rides and she was looking for some gear, specifically pants and a jacket and was kinda surprised when she started looking at pants. Most of them don't even have any protection on the hips and jerseys's are a joke. I wear a chest protector, cause I banged my ribs on one of my falls a few years ago.
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  9. SR1

    SR1 Back in S. Korea

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    I admit it...I ride far more "aggressively" in my leathers than in cordura gear. I think that's what you're getting at.
    #9
  10. ctfz1

    ctfz1 Long timer

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    Choices.
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  11. motogon

    motogon Like wind

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    Because on dirt bike you have to move to balance a lot, if you don't have enough flexibility or you have restrictive gear you will fall A LOT!
    That's why dirt bikes have tiny narrow seats - it's not for seating. :lol3
    #11
  12. Dirtgeek

    Dirtgeek Guest

    when i feel some complacency creeping in (like yesterday) its time stay vigilant about the riding gear. i feel i have a responsibility to my family to wear the gear so if i do go down then i'll have done what i can to minimize the injuries. i also think its important to practice basic riding skills...think emergency stops at the local comm. college parking lot.

    as far as worrying too much about it i think its more important to not get complacent. it also helps to have gear that you don't mind putting on. if you don't like the gear you have you may be more apt to not wear it. if you get stuff that looks good, is well made, and climate specific i feel you will won't mind putting it on. sorry i rambled on.

    as far as the original question: i like to think that the ones that are atgatt prolly are more apt to stay up on their riding skills as well.

    al:1drink
    #12
  13. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

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    LOL, very true. :freaky
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  14. MayQueen

    MayQueen Reality is unrealistic.

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    Pretty new here and just got my endorsement, so my opinion may not carry much weight, but I have to say that as I have been observing riders out on the streets, I am finding that the ones in full gear look the coolest by far.
    #14
  15. Dirtgeek

    Dirtgeek Guest

    mayqueen do you have a moto yet? reason i'm asking is cause my wife is going to take the brc next month and at some point will want her own moto. whats important to you as far as type of bike, height, style...that sort of stuff.

    thanks

    al:1drink
    #15
  16. nick_t

    nick_t Adventurer

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    man, that sums it up for me.

    it may take a few more minutes to put on my gear, but if it saves my skin (literally), it's totally worth it.

    i also get made fun of for putting on lots of gear, but it doesn't bother me. i actually feel a little compassion for the people making fun of me -- they won't be laughing when they have ground chuck for elbows.

    on that note, i went and saw Dave Ramsey the other day. he brought up the situation when people ridicule you for driving a beat-up car or not eating out all the time -- i.e. spending money you don't have. he pointed out that he would rather be weird and debt-free than like all his friends -- broke and normal.

    i would rather be weird and have skin, than be "cool" and flesh-less.

    nick
    #16
  17. street rider

    street rider Grow old not up

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    A.T.G.A.T.T. is just as important as skills. However we do have choices. I could get in trouble as an MSF rider caoch but in Florida when its hot I don't always have a jacket on however I do on the range. On my touring bike I somtimes use a half shell helmet, DOT police type. In reference to my skills I ride over 25,000 miles a year, practice 2 hours a week with the Daytona Harley Drilll Team and teach 2 or 3 times a month.
    Whats more important, skills or gear, its up to you.
    #17
  18. MayQueen

    MayQueen Reality is unrealistic.

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    I don't have a bike yet. This is a touchy subject at home right now. My husband and I took the MSF class together. I passed, he didn't.

    For me, the most important part of finding a bike will probably be height and fit as far as where my hands are and reach of controls. I'm just 5', so I will need to find something that I will be able to flat foot on. I rode a Rebel in class and that fit me pretty well. I will be looking at the Shadow as soon as I can get over to the dealer. Another bike that has been recommended to me because of my height is the Buell Blast.

    Gear will be another fun thing, ha. I'm short and fluffy. I'm sure things will have to be shortened when I do find them. Nothing I haven't dealt with in my life before though. :D

    Good luck to Mrs Dirtgeek!!!!
    #18
  19. Dirtgeek

    Dirtgeek Guest

    thanks for a newbie lady's pov...not meant to be demeaning in any way.

    as far as your husband not passing and you did! congrats!

    bwaha ha ha ha ha ha ha! on him.

    thanks and good luck.

    al:1drink
    #19
  20. PacWestGS

    PacWestGS Life Is The Adventure!

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    You are confusing flexibility and perceived protection with top tier motocrossers of old, who feel invincible. Many (nowdays) wear very expensive Titanium braces and CE approved pressure suits under their pants and jerseys.

    The old plastic chest protector was more for "Roost" protection, it provides very little in terms of hitting the ground.

    I wear more protective (and restrictive) gear off-road than I do on-road and I wear a "Stich" (1pc Roadcrafter) with back-protection inserted in it. I don't put allot of faith in some of the foam pads clothiers put in their garments. I wear them for abraision resistance.

    I wear good gloves, MC boots and the best helmets I can afford.

    I tried all the other methods in crash testing - Blue jeans, t-shirts, short-sleeve shirts and all sorts of MX gear. :lol3

    Not crashing will protect you the most! :deal
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